avatar Fedex Corporation Transportation, Communications, Electric, Gas, And Sanitary Services

Pages

  • Page 1

    MESSAGE FROM THE CFO TO OUR SHAREOWNERS: Several years ago, we committed to managing FedEx In response to the growing demand for our services, we’ve Corporation for improving financial performance — setting taken a very disciplined approach to investing in the business very specific long-term goals around improved margins, earn- to increase capacity for future growth. We’ve been able to ings growth, better cash flow and higher return on capital. hold our capital expenditures to within 5 to 8 percent of revenue Since then, we’ve consistently delivered against those goals. in recent years, and the $2.5 billion in capital spending fore- And in FY05, we recorded our best performance yet. casted for FY06 remains within that range. Additionally, solid improvement in operating cash flow allowed us to repay nearly As our independent operating companies and unique global $800 million in debt in FY05, and for the second straight year networks continue to find new and better ways to compete we have more than $1 billion in cash on the balance sheet. collectively, demand for the entire portfolio of FedEx services has steadily grown. Over the past five years, FedEx This consistent performance and ongoing focus on our finan- Corporation revenue has increased to $29.4 billion in FY05 cial goals have also paid off for our shareowners. For the third from $18.3 billion in FY00, thanks to solid volume growth, straight year we increased our dividend payment, boosting strategic acquisitions, new services and steady pricing disci- our quarterly dividend by 14 percent to 8 cents per share on pline. Our continued focus on productivity across the corpora- May 27, 2005. Even more significantly, for the five-year period tion has helped us also drive sustainable improvement in ending May 31, 2005, our total cumulative return to shareowners operating margin in recent years, growing to 8.4 percent in is up more than 150 percent — outpacing the S&P 500 and the FY05 from 6.7 percent in FY00. And during that same time period Dow Jones Transportation Index. net income has more than doubled — increasing to $1.4 billion in FY05 from $688 million in FY00. We view this as a very But not all of our financial goals deal with dollars. Another strong indication that our operating strategy is working. critical focus for FedEx is our long-standing commitment to integrity, transparency and excellent internal controls. In Comparison of Five-Year Cumulative Total Return * * FY05, that commitment was demonstrated by more than 1,200 FedEx employees who spent nearly 100,000 hours ensuring we $ 300 fully comply with the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Thanks to their hard work, internal controls $ 250 were strengthened with the documentation of approximately 225 key financial processes, which are supported by more than 200 financial IT systems. Our intention was not only to $ 200 comply with the law but also to build upon a process that will further enhance a strong controls mindset across all of FedEx $ 150 — today and into the future. Our outstanding results in FY05 followed several years of con- $ 100 sistently strong performance. Now, thanks to carefully planned expansion we are financially well positioned to take $ 50 advantage of the host of future growth opportunities in the global marketplace. 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 FedEx Corporation Common Stock S&P 500 Dow Jones Transportation Average *Shows the value, at the end of each of the last five fiscal years, of $100 Alan B. Graf, Jr. invested in FedEx stock or the relevant index on May 31, 2000, and assumes reinvestment of dividends. Fiscal year ended May 31. Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer 36


  • Page 2

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF OPERATIONS AND FINANCIAL CONDITION OVERVIEW OF FINANCIAL SECTION DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS The financial section of the FedEx Corporation (also referred to FedEx provides a broad portfolio of transportation, e-commerce as “FedEx”) Annual Report, consists of this Management’s and business services through operating companies that Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations and Financial compete collectively and are managed collaboratively under Condition (“MD&A”), the Consolidated Financial Statements and the respected FedEx brands. These operating companies are the notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, and Other primarily represented by FedEx Express, the world’s largest Financial Information, which include information about our sig- express transportation company; FedEx Ground, a leading nificant accounting policies, practices and the transactions that provider of small-package ground delivery services; FedEx underlie our financial results. The following MD&A describes the Freight, a leading U.S. provider of regional LTL freight services; principal factors affecting the results of operations, liquidity, cap- and FedEx Kinko’s, a leading provider of document solutions ital resources, contractual cash obligations and the critical and business services, which was formed following the acqui- accounting policies and estimates of FedEx. The discussion in the sition of Kinko’s, Inc. on February 12, 2004. These companies financial section should be read in conjunction with the other form the core of our reportable segments. See “Reportable sections of this Annual Report. Segments” for further discussion. The key indicators necessary to understand our operating results ORGANIZATION OF INFORMATION include: Our MD&A is comprised of three major sections: Results of • the overall customer demand for our various services; Operations, Financial Condition and Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates. These sections include the following information: • the volumes of transportation and business services provided through our networks, primarily measured by our average daily • Results of Operations includes an overview of consolidated 2005 volume and shipment weight; results compared to 2004, and 2004 results compared to 2003. This section also includes a discussion of key actions and • the mix of services purchased by our customers; events that impacted our results, as well as a discussion of our • the prices we obtain for our services, primarily measured by outlook for 2006. average price per shipment (yield); and • The overview is followed by a financial summary and analysis • our ability to manage our cost structure for capital expendi- (including a discussion of both historical operating results and tures and operating expenses such as salaries and benefits, our outlook for 2006) for each of our four reportable business fuel and maintenance and to match such expenses to shifting segments. volume levels. • The financial condition of FedEx is reviewed through an analysis Except as otherwise specified, references to years indicate of key elements of our liquidity, capital resources and contrac- our fiscal year ended May 31, 2005 or ended May 31 of the year tual cash obligations, including a discussion of our cash flows referenced and comparisons are to the prior year. statements and our financial commitments. • We conclude with a discussion of the critical accounting policies and estimates that we believe are important to under- standing certain of the material judgments and assumptions incorporated in our reported financial results. 37


  • Page 3

    FEDEX CORPORATION RESULTS OF OPERATIONS CONSOLIDATED RESULTS The following table compares revenues, operating income, operating margin, net income and diluted earnings per share (dollars in millions, except per share amounts) for the years ended May 31: Dollar Change Percent Change 2005 (1) 2004 (2) 2003 2005/2004 2004/2003 2005/2004 2004/2003 Revenues $29,363 $24,710 $22,487 4,653 2,223 19 10 Operating income $ 2,471 $ 1,440 $ 1,471 1,031 (31) 72 (2) Operating margin 8.4% 5.8% 6.5% NM NM 260 bp (70) bp Net income(3) $ 1,449 $ 838 $ 830 611 8 73 1 Diluted earnings per share(3) $ 4.72 $ 2.76 $ 2.74 1.96 0.02 71 1 (1) Includes $48 million ($31 million, net of tax, or $0.10 per diluted share) related to an Airline Stabilization Act charge described below. (2) Includes $435 million ($270 million, net of tax, or $0.89 per diluted share) of business realignment costs described below. Also, see Note 5 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements. (3) 2005 includes a $12 million, or $0.04 per diluted share benefit from an income tax adjustment described below. 2004 includes a $37 million, net of tax, or $0.12 per diluted share benefit related to a favorable ruling on a tax case and the reduction of our effective tax rate described below. Also, see Note 12 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements. The following table shows changes in revenues and operating income by reportable segment for 2005 compared to 2004, and 2004 compared to 2003 (in millions): Dollar Change Percent Change Dollar Change Percent Change Revenues Revenues Operating Income Operating Income 2005/2004 2004/2003 2005/2004 2004/2003 2005/2004 2004/2003 2005/2004 2004/2003 FedEx Express segment 1,988 1,030 11 6 785 (1) (154) (2) 125 (20) FedEx Ground segment 770 329 20 9 82 28 16 6 FedEx Freight segment 528 246 20 10 110 51 45 26 FedEx Kinko’s segment 1,545 521 NM NM 61 39 NM NM Other and Eliminations (3) (178) 97 NM NM (7) 5 (117) NM 4,653 2,223 19 10 1,031 (31) 72 (2) (1) Includes $48 million related to an Airline Stabilization Act charge described below. (2) Includes $428 million of business realignment costs described below. (3) Includes the results of operations of FedEx Kinko’s from February 12, 2004 (date of acquisition) through February 29, 2004 (approximately $100 million of revenue and $6 million of operating income). The following table shows selected operating statistics (in thou- During 2005, revenue growth was attributable to volume and yield sands, except yield amounts) for the years ended May 31: improvements across all transportation segments and the inclu- Percent Change sion of FedEx Kinko’s for the full year. Combined volume growth in 2005/ 2004/ our package businesses increased 8%, the strongest growth rate 2005 2004 2003 2004 2003 experienced in several years. Yields improved primarily due to Average daily package incremental jet and diesel fuel surcharges and rate increases. volume (ADV): FedEx Express 3,259 3,167 3,121 3 1 Revenue growth during 2004 was attributable to increased vol- FedEx Ground 2,609 2,285 2,168 14 5 umes of FedEx Express International Priority (IP), FedEx Ground Total ADV 5,868 5,452 5,289 8 3 and FedEx Freight shipments, as well as strong growth of IP Average daily LTL shipments: yields at FedEx Express. Yield improvements at FedEx Ground and FedEx Freight 63 58 56 9 4 FedEx Freight also contributed to 2004 revenue growth. In addi- Revenue per package (yield): tion, FedEx Kinko’s (acquired on February 12, 2004) added $621 FedEx Express $20.10 $ 18.55 $17.69 8 5 million of revenue during 2004. FedEx Ground 6.68 6.48 6.25 3 4 LTL yield (revenue per hundredweight): FedEx Freight $15.48 $ 14.23 $13.40 9 6 38


  • Page 4

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS During 2005, operating income increased primarily due to revenue Interest Entities, an Interpretation of ARB No. 51,” which together growth in all transportation segments and improved margins at resulted in eight MD11 aircraft being recorded as fixed assets FedEx Express and FedEx Freight. FedEx Express benefited from and the related obligations being recorded as long-term debt. the realization of a full year of savings from our 2004 business Interest expense in 2004 was also affected by additional borrow- realignment programs (versus a half year in 2004), which reduced ings related to the FedEx Kinko’s acquisition in February of 2004. the growth in salaries, wages and benefits. Although our fuel Other expense also increased $14 million during 2005, primarily costs increased significantly during 2005, higher revenues from due to the writedown of certain individually immaterial invest- our jet and diesel fuel surcharges at FedEx Express and FedEx ments and foreign exchange transaction losses. Freight more than offset these higher fuel costs. In addition, rein- Our effective tax rate was 37.4% in 2005, 36.5% in 2004, and statement of a fuel surcharge at FedEx Ground during the third 38.0% in 2003. The 37.4% effective tax rate in 2005 was favorably quarter of 2005 partially mitigated the impact of their higher fuel impacted ($12 million tax benefit or $0.04 per diluted share) by costs during the last two quarters of 2005. the one-time reduction of a valuation allowance on foreign tax Operating income decreased 2% in 2004 as costs related to our credits arising from certain of our international operations as a business realignment initiatives totaled $435 million (partially result of the passage of the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 offset by approximately $150 million of savings). See “Business and by a lower effective state tax rate. The lower effective rate Realignment Costs” for a discussion of these costs and related in 2004 was primarily attributable to the favorable decision in the savings. Higher incentive compensation and pension costs and tax case discussed below, stronger than anticipated interna- base salary increases, as well as higher maintenance expenses, tional results and the results of tax audits during 2004. Our were offset by revenue growth and ongoing cost control efforts stronger than anticipated international results, along with other during the year. factors, increased our ability to credit income taxes paid to for- eign governments on foreign income against U.S. income taxes Salaries and employee benefits expense increased 12% during on the same income, thereby mitigating the exposure to double 2005 primarily due to higher incentive compensation, a full 12 taxation. For 2006, we expect the effective tax rate to be approx- months of FedEx Kinko’s and increased medical costs. Incentive imately 38%. The actual rate, however, will depend on a number compensation increased approximately $170 million during 2005 of factors, including the amount and source of operating income. primarily due to above-plan operating income at our transporta- tion segments. Pension cost increased only $18 million in 2005 In February 2005, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals reaffirmed after a $115 million increase in 2004. Salaries and benefits the favorable ruling from the U.S. District Court in Memphis expense increased 10% during 2004 due to higher incentive com- regarding the tax treatment of jet engine maintenance costs, pensation and pension costs, wage rate increases and the previously received during the first quarter of 2004. The period acquisition of FedEx Kinko’s. Incentive compensation increased during which the U.S. Department of Justice could appeal the approximately $240 million during 2004 due to above-plan oper- decision lapsed in May 2005, making the decision final. The dis- ating income, primarily at FedEx Express and FedEx Freight. trict court held that these costs were ordinary and necessary business expenses and properly deductible in our income tax Purchased transportation increased at a faster rate than revenue returns. Neither the Sixth Circuit’s decision nor the government’s in 2005 reflecting higher fuel surcharges from third party trans- decision not to pursue an appeal had any impact on our finan- portation providers and increased use of contract carriers to cial condition, results of operations or tax rate during 2005. As a support international express and domestic LTL volume growth. result of the District Court ruling, we recognized a one-time ben- Other operating expenses increased disproportionately in 2005 efit of $26 million, net of tax, or $0.08 per diluted share in the first primarily due to the inclusion of a full year of production supplies quarter of 2004, primarily related to the reduction of accruals costs at FedEx Kinko’s. and the recognition of interest earned on amounts previously Other Income and Expense and Income Taxes paid to the IRS. These adjustments affected both net interest Net interest expense increased $23 million during 2005. The expense ($30 million pretax) and income tax expense ($7 mil- increase in interest expense was primarily due to the full year lion). We expect to receive a refund payment of approximately effect of borrowings related to the FedEx Kinko’s acquisition and $80 million (before income taxes of approximately $16 million) the impact on comparisons of a prior year favorable adjustment from the U.S. government in the first quarter of 2006, which is (the positive resolution of the tax case described below). Net included in current receivables. interest expense decreased slightly in 2004 as the effects of the Business Realignment Costs tax case described below offset increases to interest expense. During the first half of 2004, voluntary early retirement incentives These increases were due to the amendment of aircraft operat- with enhanced pension and postretirement healthcare benefits ing leases and the adoption of Financial Accounting Standards were offered to certain groups of employees at FedEx Express Board Interpretation No. (“FIN”) 46, “Consolidation of Variable 39


  • Page 5

    FEDEX CORPORATION who were age 50 or older. Voluntary cash severance incentives supported by stable worldwide monetary policy and continued were also offered to eligible employees at FedEx Express. These growth in corporate profitability in the U.S. and Asia. programs were limited to eligible U.S. salaried staff employees Volatility in fuel costs may pressure quarterly earnings growth as and managers. Approximately 3,600 employees accepted offers the trailing impact of adjustments to the FedEx Express fuel sur- under these programs. Costs were also incurred for the elimina- charge can significantly affect earnings in the short term. tion of certain management positions, primarily at FedEx Express Incremental costs associated with the new westbound around- and FedEx Services, based on the staff reductions from the vol- the-world flight at FedEx Express will be significant in 2006, and a untary programs and other cost reduction initiatives. Costs for the competitive pricing environment may limit base U.S. domestic benefits provided under the voluntary programs were recognized yield growth, particularly in our package businesses. U.S. domes- in the period that eligible employees accepted the offer. Other tic pension costs are expected to increase by more than $60 costs associated with business realignment activities were million in 2006 based on a declining discount rate. recognized in the period incurred. Our management teams continue to examine additional cost We recognized $435 million of business realignment costs during reduction and operational productivity opportunities as we focus 2004. No material costs for these programs were incurred in 2005. on optimizing our networks, improving our service offerings and At May 31, 2004, we had remaining business realignment related enhancing the customer experience. These opportunities include accruals of $28 million. The remaining accruals relate to man- initiatives to improve pickup and delivery efficiency, increase agement severance agreements, which are payable over future cross-operating company collaboration, and manage the growth periods. At May 31, 2005, these accruals had decreased to $7 of employee salaries and benefits. During 2006, we expect con- million due predominantly to cash payments made in 2005. tinued strong growth of international volumes and yields at FedEx Over the past few years, we have taken many steps to bring our Express. We expect modest growth in U.S. domestic revenue at expense growth in line with revenue growth, particularly at FedEx FedEx Express. We anticipate improved volumes and yields at Express, while maintaining our industry-leading service levels. FedEx Ground and FedEx Freight, as FedEx Ground continues its The business realignment programs were another step in this multi-year capacity expansion plan and FedEx Freight continues ongoing process of reducing our cost structure to increase our to grow its regional and interregional business and enhance its competitiveness, meet the future needs of our employees and portfolio of services. We expect that FedEx Kinko’s will generate provide the expected financial returns for our shareholders. revenue growth from the transition of FedEx World Service Centers to FedEx Kinko’s Ship Centers, the growth of current lines Airline Stabilization Act Charge of business and expansion of our retail network. During the second quarter of 2005, the United States Department of Transportation (“DOT”) issued a final order in its administrative Investments in our highest margin service lines will accelerate review of the FedEx Express claim for compensation under the Air in 2006 as we add incremental international routes, deploy new Transportation Safety and System Stabilization Act (“Act”). Under productivity-enhancing technologies and broaden the size of our its interpretation of the Act, the DOT determined that FedEx aircraft fleet and sortation capacity to meet future growth. While Express was entitled to $72 million of compensation, an increase these investments will increase costs, we still expect improve- of $3 million from its initial determination. Because we had previ- ment in operating margin and cash flows in 2006. ously received $101 million under the Act, the DOT demanded The pilots of FedEx Express, which represent a small number of repayment of $29 million, which was made in December 2004. FedEx Express total employees, are employed under a collective Because we could no longer conclude that collection of the bargaining agreement that became amendable on May 31, 2004. entire $119 million of such compensation recorded in 2002 was In accordance with applicable labor law, we will continue to probable, we recorded a charge of $48 million in the second operate under our current agreement while we negotiate with quarter of 2005 ($31 million net of tax, or $0.10 per diluted share), our pilots. Contract negotiations with the pilots’ union began in representing the DOT’s repayment demand of $29 million and the March 2004 and are ongoing. We cannot estimate the financial write-off of a $19 million receivable. We are vigorously contesting impact, if any, the results of these negotiations may have on our this determination judicially and will continue to aggressively pur- future results of operations. sue our compensation claim. Should any additional amounts ultimately be recovered by FedEx Express on this matter, they will Increased security requirements for air cargo carriers have not be recognized in the period that they are realized. had a material impact on our operating results for the peri- ods presented. In November 2004, the Transportation Security Outlook Administration (“TSA”) proposed new rules enhancing many of the Our outlook for 2006 is based on the expectation of continued, security requirements for air cargo on both passenger and all- albeit slower, growth in the U.S. economy. While comparisons cargo aircraft. Because the TSA’s proposed rules are subject to will be more difficult against a very strong 2005, we expect con- comment, any final rules may differ significantly from the proposed tinued revenue and earnings growth across all FedEx operating rules. Accordingly, it is not yet possible to estimate the impact, if companies. We also expect a stable global economy in 2006, 40


  • Page 6

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS any, that the adoption of new rules by the TSA or any other addi- model used to value them, and the market value of our common tional security requirements may have on our results of operations. stock. If applied to the years ended May 31, 2005 and 2004, the However, it is possible that increased security requirements could impact of that standard would have materially approximated that of impose substantial incremental costs on us and our competitors. SFAS 123 as presented in Note 1 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements (reducing earnings per diluted share in 2005 Future results will depend upon a number of factors, including and 2004 by $0.12 and $0.08, respectively). SFAS 123R also requires U.S. and international economic conditions, the impact from any the benefits of tax deductions in excess of recognized compensa- terrorist activities or international conflicts, our ability to match tion cost to be reported as a financing cash flow, rather than as an our cost structure and capacity with shifting volume levels, our operating cash flow as required under current standards. Based ability to effectively leverage our new service and growth on historical experience, we do not expect the impact of adopting initiatives and our ability to successfully conclude contract nego- SFAS 123R to be material to our reported consolidated cash flows. tiations with our pilots and defend against challenges to our independent contractor model described in Note 19 to the REPORTABLE SEGMENTS accompanying consolidated financial statements. In addition, FedEx Express, FedEx Ground, FedEx Freight and FedEx Kinko’s adjustments to our fuel surcharges lag changes in actual fuel form the core of our reportable segments. Our reportable seg- prices paid. Therefore, our operating income could be materially ments include the following businesses: affected should the price of fuel suddenly change by a significant amount. See “Forward-Looking Statements” for a more complete FedEx Express Segment FedEx Express (express transportation) discussion of potential risks and uncertainties that could materi- FedEx Trade Networks ally affect our future performance. (global trade services) Seasonality of Business FedEx Ground Segment FedEx Ground (small-package Our businesses are seasonal in nature. The transportation and ground delivery) business services industries are affected directly by the state of FedEx SmartPost the overall domestic and international economies. Seasonal fluc- (small-parcel consolidator) tuations affect volumes, revenues and earnings. Historically, the FedEx Supply Chain Services U.S. express package business experiences an increase in vol- (contract logistics) umes in late November and December. International business, FedEx Freight Segment FedEx Freight (LTL freight particularly in the Asia to U.S. market, peaks in October and transportation) November due to U.S. holiday sales. Our first and third fiscal FedEx Custom Critical quarters, because they are summer vacation and post winter- (time-critical transportation) holiday seasons, have historically exhibited lower volumes Caribbean Transportation Services relative to other periods. Normally, the fall is the busiest shipping (airfreight forwarding) period for FedEx Ground, while late December, June and July are the slowest periods. For FedEx Freight, the spring and fall are the FedEx Kinko’s Segment FedEx Kinko’s (document solutions busiest periods and the latter part of December, January and and business services) February are the slowest periods. For FedEx Kinko’s, the summer FedEx Services provides customer-facing sales, marketing and months are normally the slowest periods. Shipment levels, oper- information technology support, primarily for FedEx Express and ating costs and earnings for each of our companies can also be FedEx Ground. The costs for these activities are allocated based adversely affected by inclement weather. on metrics such as relative revenues or estimated services pro- vided. We believe these allocations approximate the cost of NEW ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS providing these functions. The operating expenses line item On December 16, 2004, the Financial Accounting Standards Board “Intercompany charges” on the accompanying financial sum- (“FASB”) issued SFAS 123R, “Share-Based Payment.” SFAS 123R maries of our reportable segments includes the allocations from is a revision of SFAS 123 and supersedes APB 25. The new stan- FedEx Services to FedEx Express, FedEx Ground, FedEx Freight dard requires companies to record compensation expense for and FedEx Kinko’s. The “Intercompany charges” caption also stock-based awards using a fair value method and is effective for includes allocations for services provided between operating annual periods beginning after June 15, 2005 (effective in 2007 for companies and certain other costs such as corporate manage- FedEx). Compensation expense will be recorded over the requi- ment fees related to services received for general corporate site service period, which is typically the vesting period of the oversight, including executive officers and certain legal and award. We plan to adopt this standard using the modified finance functions. Management evaluates segment financial prospective method. performance based on operating income. The impact of the adoption of SFAS 123R cannot be predicted at In addition, certain FedEx operating companies provide trans- this time because it will depend on levels of share-based payments portation and related services for other FedEx companies outside granted in the future, as well as the assumptions and the fair value 41


  • Page 7

    FEDEX CORPORATION their reportable segment. Billings for such services are based on The following table compares selected statistics (in thousands, negotiated rates, which we believe approximate fair value, and except yield amounts) for the years ended May 31: Percent Change are reflected as revenues of the billing segment. Such inter- 2005/ 2004/ segment revenues and expenses are not separately identified 2005 2004 2003 2004 2003 in the following segment information as the amounts are not Package Statistics (1) material and are eliminated in the consolidated results. Average daily package volume (ADV): U.S. overnight box 1,184 1,179 1,176 – – FEDEX EXPRESS SEGMENT U.S. overnight The following table compares revenues, operating expenses and envelope 680 667 679 2 (2) operating income and margin (dollars in millions) for the years U.S. deferred 958 925 897 4 3 ended May 31: Percent Change Total U.S. 2005/ 2004/ 2005 2004 2003 2004 2003 domestic ADV 2,822 2,771 2,752 2 1 IP 437 396 369 10 7 Revenues: Total ADV 3,259 3,167 3,121 3 1 Package: Revenue per package (yield): U.S. overnight box $ 5,969 $ 5,558 $ 5,432 7 2 U.S. overnight box $ 19.77 $ 18.49 $ 18.18 7 2 U.S. overnight U.S. overnight envelope 10.37 10.00 9.95 4 1 envelope 1,798 1,700 1,715 6 (1) U.S. deferred 11.46 10.99 11.02 4 – U.S. deferred 2,799 2,592 2,510 8 3 U.S. domestic Total U.S. domestic composite 14.69 13.94 13.82 5 1 package revenue 10,566 9,850 9,657 7 2 IP 55.07 50.75 46.59 9 9 International Composite Priority (IP) 6,134 5,131 4,367 20 17 package yield 20.10 18.55 17.69 8 5 Total package revenue 16,700 14,981 14,024 11 7 Freight Statistics (1) Freight: Average daily freight pounds: U.S. 1,854 1,609 1,564 15 3 U.S. 8,885 8,519 8,969 4 (5) International 381 393 400 (3) (2) International 1,914 2,093 2,174 (9) (4) Total freight revenue 2,235 2,002 1,964 12 2 Total average daily Other(1) 550 514 479 7 7 freight pounds 10,799 10,612 11,143 2 (5) Total revenues 19,485 17,497 16,467 11 6 Revenue per pound (yield): Operating expenses: U.S. $ 0.82 $ 0.74 $ 0.69 11 7 Salaries and International 0.78 0.74 0.72 5 3 employee benefits 7,704 7,403 7,001 4 6 Composite Purchased freight yield 0.81 0.74 0.69 9 7 transportation 843 694 609 21 14 Rentals and (1) Package and freight statistics include only the operations of FedEx Express. landing fees 1,608 1,531 1,557 5 (2) Depreciation and FedEx Express Segment Revenues amortization 798 810 818 (1) (1) FedEx Express segment total revenues increased in 2005, princi- Fuel 2,012 1,343 1,231 50 9 pally due to higher IP revenues (particularly in Asia, U.S. outbound Maintenance and repairs 1,276 1,193 1,087 7 10 and Europe) and higher U.S. domestic package revenues. During Business realignment 2005, IP revenues experienced solid growth of 20% on volume costs – 428 – NM NM growth of 10% and a 9% increase in yield. Asia experienced Intercompany charges 1,509 1,442 1,328 5 9 strong average daily volume growth during 2005 while outbound Other 2,321(2) 2,024 2,053 15 (1) shipments from the United States, Europe and Latin America con- Total operating tinued to improve. IP yield increased across all regions during expenses 18,071 16,868(3) 15,684 7 8 2005 due to higher fuel surcharge revenue, an increase in inter- Operating income $ 1,414 $ 629 $ 783 125 (20) national average weight per package and favorable exchange Operating margin 7.3%(2) 3.6%(3) 4.8% rate differences, partially offset by a decline in international aver- age rate per pound. (1) Other revenues includes FedEx Trade Networks. (2) Includes $48 million related to an Airline Stabilization Act charge, described herein, which reduced operating margin by 25 basis points. (3) The $428 million of business realignment costs, described herein, reduced operating margin by 244 basis points. 42


  • Page 8

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS U.S. domestic composite yield increased 5% in 2005, due to FedEx Express Segment Operating Income higher fuel surcharge revenue and increases in average weight Operating income at the FedEx Express segment increased per package and average rate per pound. U.S. domestic volumes significantly during 2005 as we benefited from a full year of sav- at FedEx Express increased 2% in 2005 after several years of flat ings from our business realignment programs (versus a half year to negative growth. Freight revenue increased during 2005 due to in 2004.) During 2004, operating income included $428 million of higher yields and growth in U.S. domestic freight volumes, which costs related to these programs. The savings from these pro- more than offset the effect of lower international freight volumes. grams were reflected in lower growth of salaries and employee As capacity is added to our international network, we may see benefits costs in 2005. During 2005, increases in revenues, sav- higher international freight volume until higher yielding IP ship- ings from our business realignment programs, the timing of ment traffic grows into added capacity. We continue to prioritize adjustments to fuel surcharges and ongoing cost control efforts sales efforts to fill the space on international flights with higher more than offset higher fuel costs, incentive compensation, pur- yielding IP shipments. In January 2005, we implemented an aver- chased transportation and maintenance costs and an Airline age list price increase of 4.6% on FedEx Express U.S. domestic Stabilization Act charge of $48 million (included in other operat- shipments and U.S. outbound international shipments, while we ing expenses). During 2004, operating income decreased 20% lowered our fuel surcharge index by 2%. due to business realignment costs (partially offset by approxi- mately $150 million of savings). Higher incentive compensation FedEx Express segment total revenues increased 6% in 2004, and pension costs and base salary increases, as well as higher principally due to higher IP revenues in Asia, Europe and U.S. out- maintenance expenses, were offset by revenue growth and bound. IP revenues increased significantly on volume growth of ongoing cost control efforts during the year. 7% and yield growth of 9%. Asia experienced strong average daily volume growth, while outbound shipments from Europe, the Salaries and benefits were higher during 2005 due to higher United States and Latin America continued to improve. The incentive compensation, increased medical benefit costs and increase in IP yield was largely attributable to Europe. The com- wage rate increases. The increase in 2004 was due to higher posite yield increase was primarily due to higher average weight incentive compensation, increased pension costs and wage rate per package, favorable exchange rate differences and higher fuel increases. The increases in both 2005 and 2004 were partially off- surcharge revenue. set by savings from the business realignment initiatives. U.S. domestic package revenue increased 2% in 2004 as both Purchased transportation costs increased at a greater rate than volumes and yields grew slightly. For U.S. domestic composite total revenues in both 2005 and 2004, led by IP volume growth yield, a small decline in average rate per pound was offset by requirements and higher utilization of contract pickup and deliv- increases in average weight per package and fuel surcharge ery services. Higher fuel costs incurred by these transportation revenue. For U.S. domestic shipments and U.S. outbound inter- providers were partially passed through and included as part of national shipments, an average list price increase of 2.5%, along purchased transportation costs which also led to the dispropor- with certain surcharge increases, became effective January tionate increase in 2005. Higher maintenance costs during 2005 2004. Freight revenue increased in 2004 due to increased yields were driven by higher utilization of aircraft and a higher average related to service mix, despite lower volumes. age of certain types of our aircraft. Other expense increased due primarily to the Airline Stabilization Act charge of $48 million, Fuel surcharge revenue increased in both 2005 and 2004 primar- higher aviation insurance expense and increased expenses to ily due to higher jet fuel prices. Our fuel surcharge is indexed to support volume growth. The 2004 increase in maintenance costs the spot price for jet fuel. Using this index, the U.S. domestic and was primarily due to the timing of scheduled aircraft mainte- outbound fuel surcharge and the international fuel surcharges nance events, higher utilization of aircraft related to USPS ranged as follows for the years ended May 31: volumes (included in U.S. freight revenues) and a higher average 2005 2004 2003 age of certain types of aircraft. Intercompany charges increased U.S. Domestic and Outbound Fuel Surcharge during both 2005 and 2004 due to higher salaries and benefits and Low 6.00% 3.00% 2.00% advertising and promotion expenses at FedEx Services. High 13.00 6.50 5.50 Average 8.96 4.38 3.54 International Fuel Surcharges Low 3.00 2.00 – High 13.00 6.50 6.00 Average 8.60 3.97 3.08 43


  • Page 9

    FEDEX CORPORATION During 2005, fuel costs were higher due to a 47% increase in the FEDEX GROUND SEGMENT average price per gallon of aircraft fuel, while gallons consumed The following table compares revenues, operating expenses and increased 4%. Fuel costs were higher in 2004 due to a 10% operating income and margin (dollars in millions) and selected increase in the average price per gallon of aircraft fuel, as fuel package statistics (in thousands, except yield amounts) for the consumption was flat. However, fuel surcharge revenue more years ended May 31: Percent Change than offset higher jet fuel prices in both 2005 and 2004. 2005/ 2004/ 2005 2004 2003 2004 2003 Rentals and landing fees decreased in 2004 due to the amend- Revenues $ 4,680 $3,910 $ 3,581 20 9 ment of operating leases for six MD11 aircraft that resulted in Operating expenses: these aircraft being recorded as fixed assets under capital lease. Salaries and In addition, as discussed in Note 17 to the accompanying consol- employee benefits 845 740 709 14 4 idated financial statements, two additional MD11s were recorded Purchased transportation 1,791 1,465 1,327 22 10 as fixed assets at September 1, 2003 as a result of the adoption of Rentals 122 98 88 24 11 FIN 46. Depreciation and amortization expense decreased in both Depreciation and 2005 and 2004, reflecting lower capital spending over the past amortization 176 154 155 14 (1) several years. Fuel 48 16 11 200 45 FedEx Express Segment Outlook Maintenance and repairs 110 95 89 16 7 We expect continued revenue growth at FedEx Express during Business realignment 2006 in both the domestic and international markets. Revenue costs – 1 – NM NM increases will be led by IP, where we expect volume and yield Intercompany charges 482 432 346 12 25 growth, particularly in Asia, U.S. outbound and Europe. We Other 502 387 362 30 7 expect slight U.S. domestic revenue growth at FedEx Express, Total operating driven by expected increases in U.S. domestic yields. expenses 4,076 3,388 3,087 20 10 Operating income $ 604 $ 522 $ 494 16 6 We expect continued operating margin improvement at FedEx Operating margin 12.9% 13.4% 13.8% Express during 2006. We anticipate additional improvement Average daily package due to IP volume growth, with solid incremental margins and volume (1) 2,609 2,285 2,168 14 5 increased yields benefiting from a favorable product mix trend. Revenue per package In addition, programs to improve operational efficiency are (yield) (1) $ 6.68 $ 6.48 $ 6.25 3 4 expected to contribute to margin growth, partially offset by (1) Package statistics include only the operations of FedEx Ground. costs associated with international route expansion. Capital expenditures at FedEx Express are expected to be higher in 2006 FedEx Ground Segment Revenues due to planned aircraft purchases to support IP volume growth Revenues increased during 2005 principally due to strong volume and vehicle replacements. growth. While the rise in average daily volume was led by con- FedEx Express recently launched the express industry’s first tinued growth of our home delivery service, average daily direct flight from mainland China to Europe. The westbound volumes increased across virtually all of our service lines. The around-the-world flight launched in late 2005 was the initial results of operations of FedEx SmartPost have been included phase of a plan which extends our global connectivity leadership. from the date of its acquisition, September 12, 2004, and con- We believe these investments will enhance our growth prospects tributed nominally to revenue growth in 2005. for these highly profitable services. Revenue growth in 2004 was due to higher volumes and yield improvement, led by increased usage of our home delivery ser- vice. Average daily volume increased at a lower rate in 2004 due to a difficult year-over-year comparison, as first quarter 2003 volume included an estimated 140,000 to 150,000 daily packages as a result of the threat of a UPS work stoppage. Yield increased during 2005 primarily due to higher extra service revenue and general rate increases, partially offset by higher customer discounts and a lower average weight per package. In January 2005, we implemented an average list price increase of 2.9%. Additionally, we reintroduced an indexed fuel surcharge for all shipments effective January 3, 2005. The fuel surcharge had been previously discontinued on January 5, 2004. 44


  • Page 10

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS Yield increased in 2004 primarily due to general rate increases FedEx Ground Segment Outlook and an increase in extra services revenue, partially offset by We expect the FedEx Ground segment to have continued revenue higher customer discounts and the elimination of the fuel sur- growth in 2006, led by increased home delivery and next-business- charge in January. day package volume and modest yield improvement. Yield improvements are expected from list price increases, improve- FedEx Ground reintroduced an indexed fuel surcharge in January ment in residential and commercial delivery area surcharges and 2005 that ranged between 1.8% and 2.5% and averaged 2.0% dur- the full year of the fuel surcharge. ing 2005. Before its elimination in January 2004, our dynamic fuel surcharge ranged between 1.3% and 1.5% and averaged 1.4% Slight growth in operating margin is expected in 2006, driven by during 2004. In 2003, the dynamic fuel surcharge ranged between productivity gains and yield improvements. During 2006, we 0.8% and 2.0% and averaged 1.2%. expect continued growth in capital spending at FedEx Ground as we continue to focus on network capacity expansion. During On September 12, 2004, we acquired the assets and assumed 2006, the multi-phase expansion plan includes the addition of one certain liabilities of FedEx SmartPost (formerly known as Parcel new hub, five hub expansions and relocations of 35 ground and Direct), a division of a privately held company, for $122 million in 16 home delivery facilities. We will continue to vigorously defend cash. FedEx SmartPost is a leading small-parcel consolidator and challenges to our independent contractor model as described in broadens our portfolio of services by allowing us to offer a cost Note 19 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements. effective option for delivering low-weight, less time-sensitive packages to U.S. residences through the U.S. Postal Service. The FEDEX FREIGHT SEGMENT financial results of FedEx SmartPost are included in the FedEx The following table shows revenues, operating expenses and Ground segment from the date of its acquisition and were not operating income and operating margin (dollars in millions) and material to 2005 results. selected statistics for the years ended May 31: Percent Change FedEx Ground Segment Operating Income 2005/ 2004/ FedEx Ground segment operating income increased 16% during 2005 2004 2003 2004 2003 2005 as revenue growth and field productivity more than offset Revenues $3,217 $2,689 $2,443 20 10 higher operating expenses. Purchased transportation increased Operating expenses: at a higher rate than revenue primarily due to the impact of higher Salaries and employee fuel costs on contractor settlements, the acquisition of FedEx benefits 1,650 1,427 1,303 16 10 SmartPost and a change in the mix of business at FedEx Supply Purchased transportation 315 254 224 24 13 Chain Services. Salaries and employee benefits, as well as other Rentals and landing fees 99 100 105 (1) (5) operating costs, increased at a faster rate in 2005 principally due Depreciation and to increases in staffing and facilities to support volume growth. amortization 102 92 88 11 5 Intercompany charges increased during 2005 due to higher Fuel 257 172 154 49 12 salaries, advertising and promotion expenses and incentive Maintenance and repairs 128 116 115 10 1 compensation at FedEx Services. During 2005, FedEx Supply Intercompany charges 26 21 17 24 24 Chain Services incurred a $10 million charge in other operating Other 286 263 244 9 8 expenses for the termination of a vendor agreement. The Total operating decrease in operating margin is primarily attributable to operat- expenses 2,863 2,445 2,250 17 9 ing losses at FedEx SmartPost, the increase in purchased Operating income $ 354 $ 244 $ 193 45 26 transportation and the one-time charge associated with FedEx Operating margin 11.0% 9.1% 7.9% Supply Chain Services. Average daily LTL shipments Operating income increased in 2004 due to volume growth, yield (in thousands) 63 58 56 9 4 improvements and increased productivity. These gains were Weight per LTL shipment (lbs) 1,132 1,127 1,114 – 1 partially offset by higher intercompany charges, increased LTL yield (revenue per healthcare and pension costs and expenses related to terminal hundredweight) $15.48 $14.23 $ 13.40 9 6 expansions and relocations. FedEx Ground utilized a larger por- Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current tion of allocated sales, marketing, information technology and period presentation. customer support resources, and their allocation of these costs increased accordingly. Furthermore, the cost of providing these services increased due to higher salaries and benefits, advertising and promotions expenses at FedEx Services. Operating margin for the segment was also negatively affected by operating losses at FedEx Supply Chain Services. 45


  • Page 11

    FEDEX CORPORATION FedEx Freight Segment Revenues A project to rebrand our two regional LTL carriers under the com- FedEx Freight segment revenues increased 20% in 2005 due to mon name “FedEx Freight” began in the fourth quarter of 2002 year-over-year growth in average daily LTL shipments (9%) and and was completed in 2005. Cumulative rebranding expenses LTL yield (9%). Market share gains, driven in part by brand totaled $41 million ($10 million in 2005). These costs, which were awareness, along with a stronger economy, contributed to the expensed as incurred, consisted primarily of incremental costs significant increase in average daily LTL shipments. LTL yield for rebranding tractors and trailers. grew during 2005, reflecting incremental fuel surcharges due to FedEx Freight Segment Outlook higher fuel prices, higher rates, growth in our interregional freight We expect revenue growth to continue in 2006 due to both LTL service and a stable pricing environment. The LTL fuel surcharge, yield improvement and LTL shipment growth. A general rate which applies to the majority of our revenue, is based on the increase and a stable industry-pricing environment are expected average of the national U.S. on-highway average prices for a gal- to contribute to LTL yield improvement. An LTL general rate lon of diesel fuel, as published by the Department of Energy. increase of 5.6% was implemented on May 16, 2005. Our LTL Using this index, the approximate LTL fuel surcharge ranged as no-fee money-back guarantee (initiated in September 2003) follows for the years ended May 31: continues to be a differentiating feature in the marketplace. The 2005 2004 2003 guarantee has been well received and we expect it to contribute Low 7.60% 3.20% 2.10% to sustained market share growth throughout 2006. We also High 14.00 8.40 6.70 expect continued consolidation among LTL carriers and sus- Average 10.90 5.30 3.50 tained positive economic conditions to provide additional opportunities for FedEx Freight to promote its regional service The increase in FedEx Freight segment revenues during 2004 was and other freight solutions. primarily due to increases in LTL yield and LTL average daily shipments, which reflected a strengthening economy and market FEDEX KINKO’S SEGMENT share gains. LTL yield grew 6% during the year, reflecting incre- The following table shows revenues, operating expenses and mental fuel surcharges due to higher fuel prices, growth in our operating income and operating margin (dollars in millions) for interregional freight service and higher rates. the year ended May 31, 2005 and for the three months ended May FedEx Freight Segment Operating Income 31, 2005 and 2004: Year Ended Three Months Ended Percent FedEx Freight segment operating income increased 45% in 2005 2005 2005 2004 Change primarily due to LTL yield and shipment growth, as well as our Revenues $2,066 $553 $ 521 6 ability to manage costs during a period of substantial growth. Operating expenses: Higher fuel surcharges and productivity gains contributed to Salaries and employee improved operating margin in 2005 in spite of higher salaries and benefits 742 189 185 2 employee benefits, purchased transportation and fuel costs. Rentals 427 100 115 (13) Purchased transportation costs increased due to growth in our Depreciation and interregional freight service, efforts to supplement our linehaul amortization 138 38 33 15 operations and higher fuel surcharges from contract carriers. Maintenance and repairs 55 19 9 111 The 26% increase in operating income at the FedEx Freight seg- Intercompany charges 6 1 – NM ment during 2004 was primarily attributable to LTL revenue Other operating expenses: growth and cost management. Operating margins improved as Supplies, including paper yield management and operational productivity gains outpaced and toner 305 73 69 6 increased incentive compensation, fuel, insurance and claims, Other 293 92 71 30 pension and healthcare costs. Purchased transportation costs Total operating expenses 1,966 512 482 6 increased primarily due to the growth of our interregional freight Operating income $ 100 $ 41 $ 39 5 service. Operating margin improved more than 100 basis points Operating margin 4.8% 7.4% 7.5% in 2004 on strong revenue growth. 46


  • Page 12

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS FedEx Kinko’s Segment Operating Results FINANCIAL CONDITION The results of operations for FedEx Kinko’s are included in our LIQUIDITY consolidated results from the date of acquisition (February 12, Cash and cash equivalents totaled $1.039 billion at May 31, 2005, 2004). The FedEx Kinko’s segment was formed in the fourth quar- compared to $1.046 billion at May 31, 2004 and $538 million at ter of 2004. The results of operations from February 12, 2004 (the May 31, 2003. The following table provides a summary of our cash date of acquisition) through February 29, 2004 were included in flows for the years ended May 31 (in millions): “Other and Eliminations” (approximately $100 million of revenue 2005 2004 2003 and $6 million of operating income). FedEx Kinko’s has focused its efforts on integrating a full range of FedEx service offerings Operating activities: and attracting a larger share of the commercial document Net income $ 1,449 $ 838 $ 830 solutions and business services markets. Noncash charges and credits 1,662 1,516 1,805 Changes in operating During 2005, revenues reflect commission revenue from FedEx assets and liabilities 6 666 (764) Express and FedEx Ground for package acceptance, continued Net cash provided by international expansion and strong demand for signs and operating activities 3,117 3,020 1,871 graphics and retail services, while the demand for domestic copy Investing activities: products has weakened. Domestic commission revenue from Business acquisitions, package acceptance experienced significant growth for the net of cash acquired (122) (2,410) – fourth quarter of 2005 as FedEx Kinko’s benefited from a full quar- Capital expenditures and ter of shipping services and the conversion of certain FedEx other investing activities (2,226) (1,252) (1,490) World Service Centers to FedEx Kinko’s Ship Centers. In the Net cash used in investing fourth quarter of 2005, international revenue grew, led by strong activities (2,348) (3,662) (1,490) growth in Asia in part due to favorable exchange rate differences. Financing activities: Revenue for retail services and signs and graphics continued to Proceeds from debt issuances – 1,599 – grow, increasing 10% in the fourth quarter of 2005, while domes- Principal payments on debt (791) (319) (10) tic copy product revenue declined 2%. Repurchase of treasury stock – (179) (186) Fourth quarter 2005 operating margin benefited from a significant Dividends paid (84) (66) (60) increase in commission revenue from package acceptance. Other financing activities 99 115 82 Additionally, our efforts to optimize production machines within Net cash (used in) provided by each store location resulted in reduced rental costs. Operating financing activities (776) 1,150 (174) margin during all periods presented was adversely impacted by Net (decrease) increase in integration activities, including facility rebranding expenses, cash and cash equivalents $ (7) $ 508 $ 207 ramp-up costs associated with the offering of packaging and ship- ping services and the centralization of FedEx Kinko’s corporate Cash Provided by Operating Activities. The $97 million increase support operations. Rebranding costs associated with the inte- in cash flows from operating activities in 2005 was largely attrib- gration of FedEx Kinko’s totaled $11 million in 2005, $5 million in the utable to increased earnings and improvement in accounts fourth quarter of 2005 and $3 million for the fourth quarter of 2004. receivable collections, partially offset by a $140 million increase in voluntary contributions to our U.S. domestic pension plans FedEx Kinko’s Segment Outlook and a decrease in the growth of operating liabilities. The $1.149 During 2006, we expect FedEx Kinko’s revenue growth, which will billion increase in cash flows from operating activities in 2004 be led by the full year impact of the transition of FedEx World was largely attributable to lower pension contributions. Working Service Centers to FedEx Kinko’s Ship Centers, the growth of capital management in 2004 more than offset cash paid related current lines of business and the expansion of our retail network. to the business realignment initiatives. We expect the 2006 operating margin will be comparable to 2005, Pension Contributions. Net cash provided by operating activities as the completion of rebranding and increased productivity reflects voluntary U.S. domestic pension plan contributions of efforts will be partially offset by costs related to growth initiatives. $460 million during 2005 (compared to $320 million during 2004 and Decreased capital spending is expected during 2006 due pri- $1.1 billion during 2003). marily to the completion of rebranding and other integration initiatives. Capital spending in 2006 will be directed toward systems enhancements and new retail locations. 47


  • Page 13

    FEDEX CORPORATION Cash Used for Business Acquisitions. During the second quarter this shelf registration statement we may issue, in one or more of 2005, we acquired FedEx SmartPost for $122 million in cash. offerings, either unsecured debt securities, common stock or a On February 12, 2004, we acquired all of the common stock of combination of such instruments. The entire $1 billion is available FedEx Kinko’s for approximately $2.4 billion in cash. See “Debt for future financings. Financing Activities” for further discussion of the FedEx Kinko’s Cash Used for Share Repurchases. We did not repurchase any acquisition. See Note 3 of the accompanying audited financial shares in 2005. During 2004, our Board of Directors authorized us statements for further discussion of these acquisitions. to buy back a total of 15 million shares of common stock. During Cash Used for Capital Investments. Capital expenditures were the first half of 2004, we repurchased 2.6 million shares at an higher in 2005 than the prior year primarily due to planned aircraft average price of $68.14 per share, which decreased cash flows expenditures at FedEx Express to support IP volume growth. We by approximately $179 million. We repurchased 3.3 million also made opportunistic purchases of aircraft in order to take shares in 2003 at an average price of $56.66 per share and this advantage of favorable pricing conditions in the used aircraft decreased cash flows by $186 million. Based on our current market for certain strategically valuable aircraft types. For 2004, financing strategy, we are issuing new shares in connection capital expenditures declined due to lower aircraft expenditures with our equity compensation programs rather than utilizing at FedEx Express, partially offset by an increase from network treasury shares. A total of 5.75 million shares remains under capacity expansion at FedEx Ground. See “Capital Resources” existing share repurchase authorizations. for further discussion. Dividends. Dividends paid in 2005, 2004 and 2003 were $84 million, Debt Financing Activities. During 2005, $600 million of senior $66 million and $60 million, respectively. On May 27, 2005, our unsecured notes matured and were repaid and $45 million in tax Board of Directors declared a dividend of $0.08 per share of com- exempt bonds were called and prepaid. During 2004, $250 million mon stock, an increase of $0.01 per share. The dividend was paid of senior unsecured notes matured and were repaid and $25 mil- on July 1, 2005 to stockholders of record as of the close of busi- lion of unsecured debt at FedEx Express matured and was repaid. ness on June 10, 2005. Each quarterly dividend payment is Our commercial paper program is backed by unused commit- subject to review and approval by our Board of Directors, and we ments under two revolving credit agreements, totaling $1 billion, intend to evaluate our dividend payment amount on an annual and any commercial paper borrowings reduces the amount basis at the end of each fiscal year. available under these agreements. In 2004, commercial paper Other Liquidity Information. We believe that our existing cash and borrowings of $1.9 billion were necessary to finance part of our cash equivalents, cash flow from operations, our commercial $2.4 billion acquisition of FedEx Kinko’s. These borrowings were paper program, revolving bank credit facilities and shelf registra- backed by a six-month, $2 billion credit agreement. In March tion statement with the SEC will adequately meet our working 2004, we issued $1.6 billion of senior unsecured notes in three capital and capital expenditure needs for the foreseeable future. maturity tranches: one, three and five years, at $600 million, $500 million and $500 million, respectively. These notes are guaranteed In the past we have been successful in obtaining investment by all of our subsidiaries that are not considered minor under capital, both domestically and internationally, although the mar- Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) regulations. Net ketplace for such capital can become restricted depending on a proceeds from these borrowings were used to repay our com- variety of economic factors. We believe the capital resources mercial paper borrowings backed by the six-month facility. We available to us provide flexibility to access the most efficient canceled the six-month credit facility in March 2004. At May 31, markets for our financing needs, including capital acquisitions, 2005 and 2004, no commercial paper borrowings were outstand- and are adequate for our future capital needs. ing and the entire $1 billion under the revolving credit agreements We have a senior unsecured debt credit rating from Standard & was available for future borrowings. Poor’s of BBB and a commercial paper rating of A-2. Moody’s Our credit agreements contain covenants requiring us to main- Investors Service has assigned us a senior unsecured debt credit tain certain fixed charge coverage and leverage ratios. We are rating of Baa2 and a commercial paper rating of P-2. Moody’s and in compliance with all covenants of our credit agreements and Standard & Poor’s both characterize our ratings outlook as do not expect the covenants to significantly affect our operations “stable.” If our credit ratings drop, our interest expense may or ability to pay dividends. In addition, we use capital and operat- increase; similarly, we anticipate that our interest expense may ing leases to finance a portion of our aircraft as well as our other decrease if our credit ratings are raised. If our commercial paper facility and equipment needs. For more information regarding our ratings drop below current levels, we may have difficulty utilizing credit facilities, see Note 7 of the accompanying consolidated the commercial paper market. If our senior unsecured debt rat- financial statements. ings drop below investment grade, our access to financing may become more limited. We have a $1.0 billion shelf registration statement with the SEC to provide flexibility and efficiency when obtaining financing. Under 48


  • Page 14

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS CAPITAL RESOURCES continue to invest in infrastructure upgrades and productivity- Our operations are capital intensive, characterized by significant enhancing technologies, the multi-year capacity expansion of the investments in aircraft, vehicles, technology, package-handling FedEx Ground network and growth and replacement vehicle facilities and sort equipment. The amount and timing of capital needs at FedEx Freight. We currently expect to fund our 2006 additions depend on various factors, including preexisting con- capital requirements with cash generated from operations. tractual commitments, anticipated volume growth, domestic and Because of substantial lead times associated with the manufac- international economic conditions, new or enhanced services, ture or modification of aircraft, we must generally plan our geographical expansion of services, competition, availability of aircraft orders or modifications three to eight years in advance. satisfactory financing and actions of regulatory authorities. While we also pursue market opportunities to purchase aircraft The following table compares capital expenditures by asset when they become available, we must make commitments category and reportable segment for the years ended May 31 regarding our airlift requirements years before aircraft are actu- (in millions): Percent Change ally needed. We are closely managing our capital spending 2005/ 2004/ based on current and anticipated volume levels and will defer or 2005 2004 2003 2004 2003 limit capital additions where economically feasible, while contin- Aircraft and related uing to invest strategically in growing service lines. equipment $ 990 $ 372 $ 762 166 (51) Facilities and sort CONTRACTUAL CASH OBLIGATIONS equipment 496 332 254 49 31 As required under SEC rules and regulations, the following table Information technology 331 249 273 33 (9) sets forth a summary of our contractual cash obligations as of Vehicles 261 212 116 23 83 May 31, 2005. Certain of these contractual obligations are Other equipment 158 106 106 49 – reflected in our balance sheet, while others are disclosed as Total capital future obligations under accounting principles generally accepted expenditures $ 2,236 $1,271 $1,511 76 (16) in the United States. Except for the current portion of long-term FedEx Express segment $ 1,195 $ 592 $ 917 102 (35) debt and capital lease obligations, this table does not include FedEx Ground segment 456 314 252 45 25 amounts already recorded on our balance sheet as current FedEx Freight segment 217 130 139 67 (6) liabilities at May 31, 2005. Accordingly, this table is not meant to FedEx Kinko’s segment 152 36 – NM NM represent a forecast of our total cash expenditures Other, principally for any of the periods presented. FedEx Services 216 199 203 9 (2) Payments Due by Fiscal Year Total capital There- expenditures $ 2,236 $1,271 $1,511 76 (16) (in millions) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 after Total Amounts reflected in Balance Sheet: Capital expenditures during 2005 were 76% higher than the prior Long-term debt $ 265 $ 844 $ – $ 499 $ – $ 787 $ 2,395 year primarily due to planned aircraft expenditures at FedEx Capital lease Express to support IP volume growth. We also made opportunis- obligations(1) 121 22 99 11 96 130 479 tic purchases of aircraft in order to take advantage of favorable Other cash obligations not reflected in Balance Sheet: pricing conditions in the used aircraft market for certain strategi- Unconditional cally valuable aircraft types. Also, additional investments were purchase made in the FedEx Ground and FedEx Freight networks to support obligations(2) 930 312 253 665 595 861 3,616 growth in customer demand. In addition, capital expenditures Interest on during 2005 include a full year of FedEx Kinko’s. Capital expendi- long-term debt 135 107 83 83 65 1,664 2,137 tures were 16% lower in 2004, with the year-over-year decrease Operating leases 1,646 1,518 1,356 1,191 1,045 7,249 14,005 due to lower aircraft expenditures at FedEx Express, partially off- Total $ 3,097 $2,803 $ 1,791 $2,449 $1,801 $10,691 $22,632 set by an increase in network capacity expansion (1) Capital lease obligations represent principal and interest payments. at FedEx Ground. FedEx Ground continues to expand its network (2) See Note 18 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements. and is on track to increase daily package pickup capacity to approximately five million by 2010. We have certain contingent liabilities that are not accrued in our Our capital expenditures are expected to be approximately $2.5 balance sheet in accordance with accounting principles gener- billion in 2006, with much of the year-over-year increase coming ally accepted in the United States. These contingent liabilities are from planned aircraft and vehicle expenditures at FedEx Express not included in the table above. to support future IP volume growth and replace vehicles. We also 49


  • Page 15

    FEDEX CORPORATION Amounts Reflected in Balance Sheet In accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in We have certain financial instruments representing potential the United States, our operating leases are not recorded in our commitments, not reflected in the table above, that were incurred balance sheet. Credit rating agencies routinely use information in the normal course of business to support our operations, concerning minimum lease payments required for our operating including surety bonds and standby letters of credit. These instru- leases to calculate our debt capacity. In addition, we have guar- ments are generally required under certain U.S. self-insurance antees under certain operating leases, amounting to $37 million programs and are also used in the normal course of international as of May 31, 2005, for the residual values of vehicles and facili- operations. While the notional amounts of these instruments are ties at the end of the respective operating lease periods. material, there are no additional contingent liabilities associated Although we expect that some of these leased assets will have a with them because the underlying liabilities are already reflected residual value at the end of the lease term that is less than the in our balance sheet. value specified in the related operating lease agreement, we do not believe it is probable that we will be required to fund material We have other long-term liabilities reflected in our balance sheet, amounts under the terms of these guarantee arrangements. including deferred income taxes, nonqualified pension and Accordingly, no material accruals have been recognized for postretirement healthcare liabilities and self-insurance accruals. these guarantees. The payment obligations associated with these liabilities are not reflected in the table above due to the absence of scheduled CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES maturities. Therefore, the timing of these payments cannot be determined, except for amounts estimated to be payable within The preparation of financial statements in accordance with 12 months that are included in current liabilities. accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to adopt accounting policies and make sig- Other Cash Obligations Not Reflected in Balance Sheet nificant judgments and estimates to develop amounts reflected The amounts reflected in the table above for purchase commit- and disclosed in the financial statements. In many cases, there ments represent noncancelable agreements to purchase goods are alternative policies or estimation techniques that could be or services. Such contracts include those for certain purchases used. We maintain a thorough process to review the application of aircraft, aircraft modifications, vehicles, facilities, computers, of our accounting policies and to evaluate the appropriateness printing and other equipment and advertising and promotions of the many estimates that are required to prepare the financial contracts. In addition, we have committed to modify our DC10 statements of a large, global corporation. However, even under aircraft for passenger-to-freighter and two-man cockpit config- optimal circumstances, estimates routinely require adjustment urations, which is reflected in the table above. Commitments to based on changing circumstances and new or better information. purchase aircraft in passenger configuration do not include the attendant costs to modify these aircraft for cargo transport. The policies and estimates discussed below include the financial Open purchase orders that are cancelable are not considered statement elements that are either the most judgmental or involve unconditional purchase obligations for financial reporting the selection or application of alternative accounting policies and purposes and are not included in the table above. Such are material to our financial statements. Management has purchase orders often represent authorizations to purchase discussed the development and selection of these critical rather than binding agreements. accounting policies and estimates with the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors and with our independent registered The amounts reflected in the table above for interest on long-term public accounting firm. debt represent future interest payments due on our long-term debt, which are primarily fixed rate. PENSION COST The amounts reflected in the table above for operating leases We sponsor defined benefit pension plans covering a majority of represent future minimum lease payments under noncancelable our employees. The accounting for pension benefits is deter- operating leases (principally aircraft and facilities) with an initial mined by accounting and actuarial methods that include or remaining term in excess of one year at May 31, 2005. In the numerous estimates, including: discount rates; expected long- past, we financed a significant portion of our aircraft needs (and term investment returns on plan assets; future salary increases; certain other equipment needs) using operating leases (a type of and employee turnover, mortality and retirement ages. “off-balance sheet financing”). At the time that the decision to The determination of our annual pension cost is highly sensitive lease was made, we determined that these operating leases to changes in these estimates because we have a large active would provide economic benefits favorable to ownership with workforce, a significant amount of assets in the pension plans, respect to market values, liquidity or after-tax cash flows. 50


  • Page 16

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS and the payout of pension benefits will occur over an extended proceeds are reinvested at the one-year forward rates implied by period in the future. For example, only 6% of the participants cov- the Citigroup Pension Discount Curve. This methodology is con- ered under our principal pension plan are retired and currently sistently applied and involves little subjectivity. However, the receiving benefits and the average remaining service life of our calculated discount rate can change materially from year to year employees approximates 14 years (normal retirement is at age based on economic market conditions that impact yields on 60). Total pension cost increased approximately $18 million in 2005 corporate bonds available in the marketplace. and approximately $115 million in 2004 primarily due to changes to Plan Assets. Pension plan assets are invested primarily in listed these estimates. Pension cost in 2006 for our U.S. domestic plans securities. Our pension plans hold only a minimal investment in is expected to increase $63 million. Pension cost is included in FedEx common stock that is entirely at the discretion of third- the salaries and employee benefits caption in our consolidated party pension fund investment managers. The estimated average income statements. rate of return on plan assets is a long-term, forward-looking Following are the components of pension cost recognized in our assumption that also materially affects our pension cost. It is income statements (in millions): required to be the expected future long-term rate of earnings on 2005 2004 2003 plan assets. At February 28, 2005, with approximately $8.7 billion Service cost $ 417 $ 376 $ 374 of plan assets, a one-basis-point change in this assumption for Interest cost 579 490 438 our domestic pension plans affects pension cost by approxi- Expected return on plan assets (707) (597) (594) mately $870,000 (a decrease in the assumed expected long-term Recognized actuarial losses 60 62 – rate of return increases pension expense). We have assumed a Other amortization 12 12 10 9.10% compound geometric long-term rate of return on our prin- $ 361 $ 343 $ 228 cipal U.S. domestic pension plan assets since 2004 and anticipate using the same assumption for 2006. Following is a discussion of the estimates we consider most critical to determining our pension costs: Establishing the expected future rate of investment return on our pension assets is a judgmental matter. Management considers Discount Rate. This is the interest rate used to discount the esti- the following factors in determining this assumption: mated future benefit payments that have been earned to date (the projected benefit obligation and the accumulated benefit obliga- • the duration of our pension plan liabilities, which drives the tion) to their net present value. The discount rate is determined investment strategy we can employ with our pension plan assets. each year at the plan measurement date (end of February) and • the types of investment classes in which we invest our pension affects the succeeding year’s pension cost. A decrease in the plan assets and the expected compound geometric return we discount rate has a negative effect on pension expense. can reasonably expect those investment classes to earn over This assumption is highly sensitive, as the following table the next 10- to 15-year time period (or such other time period illustrates: that may be appropriate). Discount Sensitivity (in millions) (2) Rate (1) Expense ABO • the investment returns we can reasonably expect our active 2006 n/a $2.1 n/a investment management program to achieve in excess of the 2005 6.285% 1.8 $14 returns we could expect if investments were made strictly in 2004 6.78% 1.7 11 indexed funds. 2003 6.99% 1.0 10 We review the expected long-term rate of return on an annual (1) The discount rate in effect at the end of the fiscal years affects the current year’s basis and revise it as appropriate. Also, we periodically commis- accumulated benefit obligation (ABO) and the succeeding year’s pension expense. (2) Sensitivities show the impact on expense and the ABO of a one-basis-point change in sion asset/liability studies performed by third-party professional the discount rate. investment advisors and actuaries. These studies project our esti- mated future pension payments and evaluate the efficiency of the We determine the discount rate (which is required to be the rate allocation of our pension plan assets into various investment at which the projected benefit obligation could be effectively categories. These studies also generate probability-adjusted settled as of the measurement date) with the assistance of actu- expected future returns on those assets. aries, who calculate the yield on a theoretical portfolio of We last performed a detailed asset/liability study for 2004 based high-grade corporate bonds (rated Aa or better) with cash flows on the introduction of the Portable Pension Account (discussed that generally match our expected benefit payments. To the extent below) which will reduce our liability duration over time, the sig- scheduled bond proceeds exceed the estimated benefit payments nificant additional contributions we made into the plans and the in a given period, the yield calculation assumes those excess 51


  • Page 17

    FEDEX CORPORATION continuing deterioration of the equity markets. That study sup- Following is information concerning the funded status of our pen- ported a long-term return on assets of 9.10%. The results of sion plans as of May 31, 2005 and 2004 (in millions): this study were reaffirmed for 2005 and 2006 by our third-party 2005 2004 professional investment advisors and actuaries and support our Funded Status of Plans: current asset allocation strategy, which is summarized below: Accumulated benefit obligation (ABO): Percent of Plan Assets Qualified U.S. domestic plans $ 8,534 $7,069 Asset Class Actual Target Other plans 399 358 Domestic equities 53% 53% Total ABO $ 8,933 $7,427 International equities 20 17 Projected benefit obligation (PBO) $ 10,401 $8,683 Private equities 2 5 Fair value of plan assets 8,826 7,783 Total equities 75 75 PBO in excess of plan assets (1,575) (900) Long duration fixed income securities 15 15 Unrecognized actuarial losses, principally due to Other fixed income securities 10 10 investments and changes in discount rate 2,500 1,694 100% 100% Unamortized prior service cost and other 100 113 Amounts included in balance sheets $ 1,025 $ 907 The actual compound geometric return on our pension plan Components of Amounts Included in assets was 10.0%, net of investment manager fees, for the 15- Balance Sheets: year period ended February 28, 2005. In 2003, we assumed a Prepaid pension cost $ 1,272 $1,127 long-term rate of return on pension assets of 10.1%. We reduced Accrued pension liability (247) (220) that estimate to 9.1% in 2004. The 100-basis-point decrease in the Minimum pension liability (63) (67) expected long-term rate of return for 2004 negatively affected our Intangible asset and other 63 67 2004 pension cost by approximately $65 million. Net amounts recognized in balance sheets $ 1,025 $ 907 Pension expense is also affected by the accounting policy used Cash Amounts: to determine the value of plan assets at the measurement date. Cash contributions during the year $ 489 $ 335 We use a calculated-value method to determine the value of plan Benefit payments during the year $ 194 $ 136 assets, which helps mitigate short-term volatility in market per- formance (both increases and decreases). Another method used The funded status of the plans reflects a snapshot of the state of in practice applies the market value of plan assets at the mea- our long-term pension liabilities at the plan measurement date. surement date. The application of the calculated-value method Declining interest rates (which increase the discounted value of reduced 2004 pension cost by approximately $106 million. The the PBO) have significantly impacted the funded status of our application of the calculated-value method approximated the plans. However, our plans remain adequately funded to provide result from applying the market-value method for 2005. benefits to our employees as they come due and current benefit payments are nominal compared to our total plan assets (benefit Salary Increases. The assumed future increase in salaries and payments for 2005 were approximately 2% of plan assets). wages is also a key estimate in determining pension cost. Furthermore, our plan assets were sufficient to fully fund the accu- Generally, we correlate changes in estimated future salary mulated benefit obligation of our qualified U.S. domestic plans in increases to changes in the discount rate (since that is an indi- 2005 and 2004 despite the continuing decline in the discount rate. cator of general inflation and cost of living adjustments) and general estimated levels of profitability (since most incentive Although not legally required, we made $460 million in contribu- compensation is a component of pensionable wages). While the tions to our qualified U.S. pension plans in 2005 compared to total discount rate has declined in each of the past three years, we contributions of $320 million in 2004. Currently, we do not expect have held the estimated rate of future salary increases at 3.15% any contributions for 2006 will be legally required. However, we because the current rate is deemed to be at or near the floor currently expect to make tax-deductible voluntary contributions based on current pay structures and improving our performance. to our qualified plans in 2006 at levels comparable to 2005. For 2006 pension cost, a one-basis-point change in the rate of Cumulative unrecognized actuarial losses were approximately estimated future salaries affects pension cost by approximately $2.5 billion through February 28, 2005, compared to $1.7 billion at $1.1 million (a decrease in this rate will decrease pension cost). February 29, 2004. These unrecognized losses primarily reflect the We currently expect to hold this assumption constant for deter- declining discount rate and the declining stock market during mination of 2006 pension cost. The decrease in this assumption 2003, 2002 and 2001. These amounts may be recovered in future to 3.15% for 2004 from 3.25% favorably impacted 2004 pension periods through actuarial gains. However, unless they are below cost by approximately $10 million. a corridor amount, these unrecognized actuarial losses are 52


  • Page 18

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS required to be amortized and recognized in future periods. For SELF-INSURANCE ACCRUALS example, projected U.S. domestic plan pension expense for 2006 We are self-insured up to certain limits for costs associated with includes $107 million of amortization of these actuarial losses workers’ compensation claims, vehicle accidents and general versus $60 million in 2005 and $62 million in 2004. business liabilities, and benefits paid under employee healthcare and long-term disability programs. At May 31, 2005 there were The net amounts reflected in our balance sheet related to pen- approximately $1.1 billion of self-insurance accruals reflected in sion items include a substantial prepaid pension asset. This our balance sheet ($1.03 billion at May 31, 2004). At May 31, 2004 results from excess cash contributions to the plans over amounts and 2003, approximately 43% of these accruals are classified as that are recognized as pension expense for financial accounting current liabilities. purposes. Amounts accrued as liabilities (including minimum pension liabilities) relate primarily to unfunded nonqualified plans The measurement of these costs requires the consideration of and international pension plans where additional funding may not historical cost experience, judgments about the present and provide a current tax deduction. expected levels of cost per claim and retention levels. We account for these costs primarily through actuarial methods, Effective in 2004, we amended the FedEx Corporation Employees’ which develop estimates of the undiscounted liability for claims Pension Plan to add a cash balance feature, which we call the incurred, including those claims incurred but not reported. These Portable Pension Account. We expect the Portable Pension methods provide estimates of future ultimate claim costs based Account will help reduce the long-term growth of our pension lia- on claims incurred as of the balance sheet date. We self-insure bilities. All employees hired after May 31, 2003 accrue benefits up to certain limits that vary by operating company and type of under the Portable Pension Account formula. Eligible employees risk. Periodically, we evaluate the level of insurance coverage as of May 31, 2003 were able to choose between continuing to and adjust insurance levels based on risk tolerance and pre- accrue benefits under the traditional pension benefit formula or mium expense. Historically, it has been infrequent that incurred accruing future benefits under the Portable Pension Account claims exceeded our self-insured limits. Other acceptable meth- formula. The election was entirely optional. There was no con- ods of accounting for these accruals include measurement of version of existing accrued benefits to a cash balance. All claims outstanding and projected payments based on historical benefits earned through May 31, 2003, including those applicable development factors. to employees electing the Portable Pension Account, will be determined under a traditional pension plan formula. Accordingly, We believe the use of actuarial methods to account for these it will be several years before the impact of the lower benefit pro- liabilities provides a consistent and effective way to measure vided under this formula has a significant impact on our total these highly judgmental accruals. However, the use of any esti- pension liabilities and costs. mation technique in this area is inherently sensitive given the magnitude of claims involved and the length of time until the Under the Portable Pension Account, the retirement benefit is ultimate cost is known. We believe our recorded obligations for expressed as a dollar amount in a notional account that grows these expenses are consistently measured on a conservative with annual credits based on pay, age and years of credited ser- basis. Nevertheless, changes in healthcare costs, accident vice and interest on the notional account balance. An employee’s frequency and severity, insurance retention levels and other pay credits will be determined each year under a graded formula factors can materially affect the estimates for these liabilities. that combines age with years of service for points. The plan inter- est credit rate will vary from year to year based on the selected LONG-LIVED ASSETS U.S. Treasury index, with a 4% minimum and a maximum based Property and Equipment. Our key businesses are capital inten- on a government rate. Employees are fully vested on completion sive with more than 45% of our total assets invested in our of five years of service. transportation and information systems infrastructures. We cap- italize only those costs that meet the definition of capital assets under accounting standards. Accordingly, repair and mainte- nance costs that do not extend the useful life of an asset or are part of the cost of acquiring the asset are expensed as incurred. However, consistent with industry practice, we capitalize certain aircraft-related major maintenance costs on one of our aircraft fleet types and amortize these costs over their estimated service lives. 53


  • Page 19

    FEDEX CORPORATION The depreciation or amortization of our capital assets over their The future commitments for operating leases are not reflected as estimated useful lives, and the determination of any salvage val- a liability in our balance sheet because these leases do not meet ues, requires management to make judgments about future events. the accounting definition of capital leases. The determination of Because we utilize many of our capital assets over relatively long whether a lease is accounted for as a capital lease or an operat- periods (the majority of aircraft costs are depreciated over 15 to 18 ing lease requires management to make estimates primarily years), we periodically evaluate whether adjustments to our esti- about the fair value of the asset and its estimated economic mated service lives or salvage values are necessary to ensure useful life. We believe we have well-defined and controlled these estimates properly match the economic use of the asset. processes for making this evaluation, including obtaining third- This evaluation may result in changes in the estimated lives and party appraisals for material transactions. residual values used to depreciate our aircraft and other equip- On February 7, 2005, the SEC posted to its Web site a letter from ment. These estimates affect the amount of depreciation expense the Chief Accountant of the SEC to the AICPA Center for Public recognized in a period and, ultimately, the gain or loss on the dis- Company Audit Firms discussing three lease accounting issues posal of the asset. Historically, gains and losses on operating that have been the cause of several recent public company equipment have not been material (typically less than $10 million restatements. Of specific concern is the appropriate accounting annually). However, such amounts may differ materially in the for: (1) the amortization of leasehold improvements by a lessee in future due to technological obsolescence, accident frequency, an operating lease with lease renewals; (2) the pattern of recog- regulatory changes and other factors beyond our control. nition of rent when the lease term in an operating lease contains a Because of the lengthy lead times for aircraft manufacture and period where there are free or reduced rents (commonly referred modifications, we must anticipate volume levels and plan our to as “rent holidays”); and (3) incentives related to leasehold fleet requirements years in advance and make commitments for improvements provided by a landlord/lessor to a tenant/lessee in aircraft based on those projections. These activities create risks an operating lease. We evaluated our accounting for the three that asset capacity may exceed demand and that an impairment lease accounting issues identified by the SEC and believe that we of our assets may occur. In addition, opportunistic aircraft pur- are in compliance with the SEC’s guidance. chases (primarily aircraft in passenger configuration) that have Goodwill. We have approximately $2.8 billion of goodwill on our not been placed in service totaled $348 million and $106 million at balance sheet resulting from the acquisition of businesses, which May 31, 2005 and 2004, respectively. We plan to modify these includes approximately $1.7 billion from our acquisition of FedEx assets in the future to place them into operation. Kinko’s in 2004. Accounting standards require that we do not The accounting test for whether an asset held for use is amortize goodwill but review it for impairment on at least impaired involves first comparing the carrying value of the asset an annual basis. with its estimated future undiscounted cash flows. If the cash The annual evaluation of goodwill impairment requires the use of flows do not exceed the carrying value, the asset must be estimates and assumptions to determine the fair value of our adjusted to its current fair value. Because the cash flows of our reporting units using a discounted cash flow methodology. In par- transportation networks cannot be identified to individual assets, ticular, the following estimates used by management can and based on the ongoing profitability of our operations, we have significantly affect the outcome of the impairment test: revenue not experienced any significant impairment of assets to be held growth rates; operating margins; discount rates and expected and used. However, from time to time we make decisions capital expenditures. Each year, independent of our goodwill to remove certain long-lived assets from service based on pro- impairment test, we update our weighted-average cost of capital jections of reduced capacity needs and those decisions may calculation and perform a long-range planning analysis to pro- result in an impairment charge. Assets held for disposal must be ject expected results of operations. Using this data, we complete adjusted to their estimated fair values when the decision is made a separate fair-value analysis for each of our reporting units. to dispose of the asset and certain other criteria are met. There Changes in forecasted operations and other assumptions could were no material asset impairment charges recognized in 2005, materially affect these estimates. We compare the fair value of 2004 or 2003. our reporting units to the carrying value, including goodwill, of Leases. We utilize operating leases to finance certain of our each of those units. We performed our annual impairment tests in aircraft and facilities. Such arrangements typically shift the risk the fourth quarter of 2005. Because the fair value of each of our of loss on the residual value of the assets at the end of the reporting units exceeded its carrying value, including goodwill, lease period to the lessor. As disclosed in “Contractual Cash no impairment charge was necessary. Obligations” and Note 8 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements, at May 31, 2005 we had approximately $14 billion (on an undiscounted basis) of future commitments for pay- ments under operating leases. The weighted average remaining lease term of all operating leases outstanding at May 31, 2005 was approximately six years. 54


  • Page 20

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS Intangible Asset with an Indefinite Life. We have an intangible under the policies described above: (1) estimates for unbilled rev- asset of $567 million associated with the Kinko’s trade name. This enue on shipments that have been delivered; (2) estimates for intangible asset is not amortized because it has an indefinite revenue associated with shipments in transit; and (3) estimates remaining useful life. We must review this asset for impairment on for future adjustments to revenue or accounts receivable for at least an annual basis. This annual evaluation requires the use of billing adjustments and bad debts. estimates about the future cash flows attributable to the Kinko’s Unbilled Revenue. There is a time lag between the completion of trade name to determine the estimated fair value of the trade name. a shipment and the generation of an invoice that varies by cus- Changes in forecasted operations and changes in discount rates tomer and operating company. Accordingly, unbilled revenue is can materially affect this estimate. However, once an impairment recognized through estimates using actual shipment volumes and of this intangible asset has been recorded, it cannot be reversed. historical trends of shipment size and length of haul. These esti- We performed our annual impairment test in the fourth quarter of mates are adjusted in subsequent months to the actual amounts 2005 which determined that the fair value of the trade name invoiced. Due to strong system controls and shipment visibility, exceeded its carrying value; therefore, no impairment charge there is a low level of subjectivity inherent in these accrual was necessary. The recoverability of recorded intangible assets, processes and the estimates have historically not varied signifi- including goodwill, at FedEx Kinko’s is dependent upon achieving cantly from actual amounts subsequently invoiced. projected expansion and growth plans for this reporting unit. Shipments in Process. The majority of our shipments have short REVENUE RECOGNITION cycle times; so, less than 5% of a total month’s revenue is typi- We believe the policies adopted to recognize revenue are critical cally in transit at the end of a period. We periodically perform because an understanding of the accounting applied in this area studies to measure the percentage of completion for shipments is fundamental to assessing our overall financial performance and in process. At month-end, we estimate the amount of revenue because revenue and revenue growth are key measures of finan- earned on shipments in process based on actual shipments cial performance in the marketplace. Our businesses are primarily picked up, the scheduled day of delivery, the day of the week involved in the direct pickup and delivery of commercial package on which the month ends (which affects the percentage of and freight shipments, as well as providing document solutions completion) and current trends in our average price for the and business services. Our employees and agents are involved respective services. We believe these estimates provide a rea- throughout the process and our operational, billing and account- sonable approximation of the actual revenue earned at the end ing systems directly capture and control all relevant information of a period. necessary to record revenue, bill customers and collect amounts Future Adjustments to Revenue and Accounts Receivable. In the due to us. transportation industry, pricing that is put in place may be subse- We recognize revenue upon delivery of shipments or, for our quently adjusted due to continued negotiation of contract terms, business services, logistics and trade services businesses, upon earned discounts triggered by certain shipment volume thresh- the completion of services. Transportation industry practice olds, and/or no fee money-backed guarantee refunds caused by includes four acceptable methods for revenue recognition for on-time service failures. We account for estimated future rev- shipments in process at the end of an accounting period, two of enue adjustments through a reserve against accounts receivable which are predominant: (1) recognize all revenue and the related that takes into consideration historical experience and current delivery costs when shipments are delivered or (2) recognize a trends. While write-offs related to bad debts do occur from time portion of the revenue earned for shipments that have been to time, they are small compared to our total revenue and picked up but not yet delivered at period end and accrue delivery accounts receivable balances due to the small value of individual costs as incurred. We use the second method; we recognize the shipping transactions, sales to a large number of customers, our portion of revenue earned at the balance sheet date for shipments short credit terms and our credit and collection practices. in transit and accrue all delivery costs as incurred. We believe this For 2005 and 2004, revenue adjustments as a percentage of total accounting policy effectively and consistently matches revenue revenue averaged approximately 3%. Due to our reliable on-time with expenses and recognizes liabilities as incurred. service, close communication with customers, strong revenue Our contract logistics, global trade services and certain trans- systems, and minimal volume discounts in place, we have main- portation businesses engage in some transactions wherein they tained a consistently low revenue adjustment percentage. A act as agents. Revenue from these transactions is recorded on a one-basis-point change in the revenue adjustment percentage net basis. Net revenue includes billings to customers less third- would increase or decrease revenue adjustments by approxi- party charges, including transportation or handling costs, fees, mately $3 million. For 2005 and 2004, bad debt expense associated commissions, taxes and duties. with credit losses has averaged approximately 0.4% of total revenue and reflects our strong credit management processes. There are three key estimates that are included in the recognition and measurement of our revenue and related accounts receivable 55


  • Page 21

    FEDEX CORPORATION MARKET RISK SENSITIVE INSTRUMENTS AND POSITIONS In practice, our experience is that exchange rates in the principal foreign markets where we have foreign currency denominated While we currently have market risk sensitive instruments related transactions tend to have offsetting fluctuations. Therefore, the to interest rates, we have no significant exposure to changing calculation above is not indicative of our actual experience in for- interest rates on our long-term debt because the interest rates eign currency transactions. In addition to the direct effects of are fixed on the majority of our long-term debt. We had approxi- changes in exchange rates, which are a changed dollar value of mately $125 million of outstanding floating-rate borrowings at the resulting reported operating results, changes in exchange May 31, 2005. We have not employed interest rate hedging to mit- rates also affect the volume of sales or the foreign currency sales igate the risks with respect to these borrowings. A hypothetical price as competitors’ services become more or less attractive. 10% increase in the interest rate on our outstanding floating-rate The sensitivity analysis of the effects of changes in foreign cur- borrowings would not have a material effect on our results of rency exchange rates does not factor in a potential change in operations. As disclosed in Note 7 to the accompanying consoli- sales levels or local currency prices. dated financial statements, we had outstanding fixed-rate, long-term debt (exclusive of capital leases) of $2.3 billion at both We have market risk for changes in the price of jet and diesel May 31, 2005 and May 31, 2004. Market risk for fixed-rate, long- fuel; however, this risk is largely mitigated by revenue from our term debt is estimated as the potential decrease in fair value fuel surcharges. In 2002, we implemented new indices for calcu- resulting from a hypothetical 10% increase in interest rates and lating U.S. domestic fuel surcharges, which more closely link the amounts to approximately $44 million as of May 31, 2005 and $49 fuel surcharges to prevailing market prices for fuel. In 2003, we million as of May 31, 2004. The underlying fair values of our long- implemented this methodology for determining a fuel surcharge term debt were estimated based on quoted market prices or on the on international shipments as well. Effective January 3, 2005, we current rates offered for debt with similar terms and maturities. reintroduced an indexed fuel surcharge for FedEx Ground ship- ments. Therefore, a hypothetical 10% change in the price of fuel While we are a global provider of transportation, e-commerce would not be expected to materially affect our earnings. and business services, the substantial majority of our transac- However, our fuel surcharges have a lag that exists before they tions are denominated in U.S. dollars. The distribution of our are adjusted for changes in fuel prices and fuel prices can foreign currency denominated transactions is such that currency fluctuate within certain ranges before resulting in a change in our declines in some areas of the world are often offset by currency fuel surcharges. Therefore, our operating income may be affected gains of equal magnitude in other areas of the world. The princi- should the spot price of fuel suddenly change by a significant pal foreign currency exchange rate risks to which we are amount or change by amounts that do not result in a change in exposed are in the Japanese yen, Taiwan dollar, Canadian dollar our fuel surcharges. and euro. During 2005 and 2004, we believe operating income was positively impacted due to foreign currency fluctuations. We do not purchase or hold any derivative financial instruments However, favorable foreign currency fluctuations also may have for trading purposes. had an offsetting impact on the price we obtained or the demand for our services. At May 31, 2005, the result of a uniform 10% strengthening in the value of the dollar relative to the currencies in which our transactions are denominated would result in a decrease in operating income of approximately $116 million for 2006 (the comparable amount in the prior year was approxi- mately $79 million). This increase is primarily due to the strong growth of our international operations. This theoretical calcula- tion assumes that each exchange rate would change in the same direction relative to the U.S. dollar. 56


  • Page 22

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS • significant changes in the volumes of shipments transported through our networks, customer demand for our various ser- Certain statements in this report, including (but not limited vices or the prices we obtain for our services; to) those contained in the following sections of MD&A, “Outlook (including segment outlooks),” “Liquidity,” “Capital • our ability to successfully defend against challenges to our Resources,” “Contractual Cash Obligations” and “Critical independent contractor model; Accounting Policies and Estimates,” and the “Employee Benefit • the outcome of negotiations to reach a new collective bargain- Plans” note to the consolidated financial statements, are ing agreement with the union that represents the pilots of FedEx “forward-looking” statements within the meaning of the Private Express; Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 with respect to the financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, plans, • market acceptance of our new service and growth initiatives; objectives, future performance and business of FedEx. Forward- • competition from other providers of transportation, e-commerce looking statements include those preceded by, followed by or that and business services, including our ability to compete with include the words “may,”“could,”“would,” “should,”“believes,” new or improved services offered by our competitors; “expects,”“anticipates,” “plans,”“estimates,”“targets,”“projects,” “intends” or similar expressions. These forward-looking • the impact of technology developments on our operations and statements involve risks and uncertainties. Actual results may on demand for our services; differ materially from those contemplated (expressed or implied) • disruptions to our technology infrastructure, including our com- by such forward-looking statements, because of, among other puter systems and Web site; things, potential risks and uncertainties, such as: • our ability to obtain and maintain aviation rights in important • economic conditions in the domestic and international markets international markets; in which we operate; • adverse weather conditions or natural disasters; • any impacts on our business resulting from new domestic or international government regulation, including regulatory • availability of financing on terms acceptable to us and our ability actions affecting aviation rights, security requirements and to maintain our current credit ratings; and labor rules; • other risks and uncertainties you can find in our press releases • the impact of any international conflicts or terrorist activities on and SEC filings. the United States and global economies in general, the trans- As a result of these and other factors, no assurance can be portation industry of FedEx in particular, and what effects these given as to our future results and achievements. Accordingly, a events will have on our costs or the demand for our services; forward-looking statement is neither a prediction nor a guaran- • our ability to manage our cost structure for capital expenditures tee of future events or circumstances and those future events or and operating expenses and match them, especially those relat- circumstances may not occur. You should not place undue ing to aircraft, vehicle and sort capacity, to shifting customer reliance on the forward-looking statements, which speak only as volume levels; of the date of this report. We are under no obligation, and we expressly disclaim any obligation, to update or alter any forward- • our ability to effectively operate, integrate and leverage the looking statements, whether as a result of new information, FedEx Kinko’s business; future events or otherwise. • sudden changes in fuel prices or currency exchange rates; • our ability to maintain or increase our fuel surcharges in response to rising fuel prices due to competitive pressures; 57


  • Page 23

    FEDEX CORPORATION MANAGEMENT’S REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended). Our internal control over financial reporting includes, among other things, defined policies and procedures for conducting and governing our business, sophisticated information systems for processing transactions and a properly staffed, professional internal audit department. Mechanisms are in place to monitor the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and actions are taken to correct deficiencies identified. Our procedures for financial reporting include the active involvement of senior management, our Audit Committee and a staff of highly qualified financial and legal professionals. Management, with the participation of our principal executive and financial officers, assessed our internal control over financial reporting as of May 31, 2005, the end of our fiscal year. Management based its assessment on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (the COSO criteria). Based on this assessment, management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of May 31, 2005. Our independent registered public accounting firm, Ernst & Young LLP, audited management’s assessment and the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Ernst & Young has issued their report concurring with management’s assessment, which is included in this Annual Report. 58


  • Page 24

    FEDEX CORPORATION REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM The Board of Directors and Stockholders FedEx Corporation We have audited management’s assessment, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting, that FedEx Corporation maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of May 31, 2005, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (the COSO criteria). FedEx Corporation’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on management’s assessment and an opinion on the effectiveness of the company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over finan- cial reporting, evaluating management’s assessment, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted account- ing principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding pre- vention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. In our opinion, management’s assessment that FedEx Corporation maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of May 31, 2005, is fairly stated, in all material respects, based on the COSO criteria. Also, in our opinion, FedEx Corporation maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of May 31, 2005, based on the COSO criteria. We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the con- solidated balance sheets of FedEx Corporation as of May 31, 2005 and 2004 and related consolidated statements of income, changes in stockholders’ investment and comprehensive income, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended May 31, 2005 of FedEx Corporation and our report dated July 12, 2005 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon. Memphis, Tennessee July 12, 2005 59


  • Page 25

    FEDEX CORPORATION CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME Years ended May 31, (In millions, except per share amounts) 2005 2004 2003 REVENUES $29,363 $ 24,710 $ 22,487 Operating Expenses: Salaries and employee benefits 11,963 10,728 9,778 Purchased transportation 2,935 2,407 2,155 Rentals and landing fees 2,314 1,918 1,803 Depreciation and amortization 1,462 1,375 1,351 Fuel 2,317 1,531 1,396 Maintenance and repairs 1,680 1,523 1,398 Business realignment costs – 435 – Other 4,221 3,353 3,135 26,892 23,270 21,016 OPERATING INCOME 2,471 1,440 1,471 Other Income (Expense): Interest expense (160) (136) (124) Interest income 21 20 6 Other, net (19) (5) (15) (158) (121) (133) Income Before Income Taxes 2,313 1,319 1,338 Provision for Income Taxes 864 481 508 NET INCOME $ 1,449 $ 838 $ 830 BASIC EARNINGS PER COMMON SHARE $ 4.81 $ 2.80 $ 2.79 DILUTED EARNINGS PER COMMON SHARE $ 4.72 $ 2.76 $ 2.74 The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements. 60


  • Page 26

    FEDEX CORPORATION CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS May 31, (In millions, except share data) 2005 2004 ASSETS Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents $ 1,039 $ 1,046 Receivables, less allowances of $125 and $151 3,297 3,027 Spare parts, supplies and fuel, less allowances of $142 and $124 250 249 Deferred income taxes 510 489 Prepaid expenses and other 173 159 Total current assets 5,269 4,970 Property and Equipment, at Cost Aircraft and related equipment 7,610 7,001 Package handling and ground support equipment 3,366 3,395 Computer and electronic equipment 3,893 3,537 Vehicles 1,994 1,919 Facilities and other 5,154 4,459 22,017 20,311 Less accumulated depreciation and amortization 12,374 11,274 Net property and equipment 9,643 9,037 Other Long-Term Assets Goodwill 2,835 2,802 Prepaid pension cost 1,272 1,127 Intangible and other assets 1,385 1,198 Total other long-term assets 5,492 5,127 $20,404 $19,134 LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ INVESTMENT Current Liabilities Current portion of long-term debt $ 369 $ 750 Accrued salaries and employee benefits 1,275 1,062 Accounts payable 1,739 1,615 Accrued expenses 1,351 1,380 Total current liabilities 4,734 4,807 Long-Term Debt, Less Current Portion 2,427 2,837 Other Long-Term Liabilities Deferred income taxes 1,206 1,106 Pension, postretirement healthcare and other benefit obligations 828 768 Self-insurance accruals 621 591 Deferred lease obligations 532 503 Deferred gains, principally related to aircraft transactions 400 426 Other liabilities 68 60 Total other long-term liabilities 3,655 3,454 Commitments and Contingencies Common Stockholders’ Investment Common stock, $0.10 par value; 800 million shares authorized; 302 million shares issued for 2005 and 300 million shares issued for 2004 30 30 Additional paid-in capital 1,241 1,079 Retained earnings 8,363 7,001 Accumulated other comprehensive loss (17) (46) 9,617 8,064 Less deferred compensation and treasury stock, at cost 29 28 Total common stockholders’ investment 9,588 8,036 $20,404 $19,134 The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements. 61


  • Page 27

    FEDEX CORPORATION CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS Years ended May 31, (In millions) 2005 2004 2003 OPERATING ACTIVITIES Net income $ 1,449 $ 838 $ 830 Adjustments to reconcile net income to cash provided by operating activities: Depreciation and amortization 1,462 1,375 1,351 Provision for uncollectible accounts 101 106 105 Deferred income taxes and other noncash items 63 (8) 329 Tax benefit on the exercise of stock options 36 43 20 Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of the effects of businesses acquired: Receivables (235) (307) (197) Other current assets (26) 10 39 Pension assets and liabilities, net (118) 155 (854) Accounts payable and other operating liabilities 365 841 252 Other, net 20 (33) (4) Cash provided by operating activities 3,117 3,020 1,871 INVESTING ACTIVITIES Capital expenditures (2,236) (1,271) (1,511) Business acquisitions, net of cash acquired (122) (2,410) – Proceeds from asset dispositions 12 18 22 Other, net (2) 1 (1) Cash used in investing activities (2,348) (3,662) (1,490) FINANCING ACTIVITIES Principal payments on debt (791) (319) (10) Proceeds from debt issuances – 1,599 – Proceeds from stock issuances 99 115 81 Dividends paid (84) (66) (60) Purchase of treasury stock – (179) (186) Other, net – – 1 Cash (used in) provided by financing activities (776) 1,150 (174) CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents (7) 508 207 Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 1,046 538 331 Cash and cash equivalents at end of period $ 1,039 $ 1,046 $ 538 The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements. 62


  • Page 28

    FEDEX CORPORATION CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ INVESTMENT AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Accumulated Additional Other Common Paid-in Retained Comprehensive Treasury Deferred (In millions, except share data) Stock Capital Earnings Loss Stock Compensation Total BALANCE AT MAY 31, 2002 $30 $ 1,144 $ 5,465 $(53) $ (20) $(21) $ 6,545 Net income – – 830 – – – 830 Foreign currency translation adjustment, net of deferred taxes of $10 – – – 37 – – 37 Minimum pension liability adjustment, net of deferred tax benefit of $7 – – – (14) – – (14) Total comprehensive income 853 Purchase of treasury stock – – – – (186) – (186) Cash dividends declared ($0.15 per share) – – (45) – – – (45) Employee incentive plans and other (3,268,180 shares issued) – (56) – – 181 (16) 109 Amortization of deferred compensation – – – – – 12 12 BALANCE AT MAY 31, 2003 30 1,088 6,250 (30) (25) (25) 7,288 Net income – – 838 – – – 838 Minimum pension liability adjustment, net of deferred tax benefit of $12 – – – (16) – – (16) Total comprehensive income 822 Purchase of treasury stock – – – – (179) – (179) Cash dividends declared ($0.29 per share) – – (87) – – – (87) Employee incentive plans and other (4,013,182 shares issued) – (9) – – 204 (18) 177 Amortization of deferred compensation – – – – – 15 15 BALANCE AT MAY 31, 2004 30 1,079 7,001 (46) – (28) 8,036 Net income – – 1,449 – – – 1,449 Foreign currency translation adjustment, net of deferred taxes of $5 – – – 27 – – 27 Minimum pension liability adjustment, net of deferred taxes of $1 – – – 2 – – 2 Total comprehensive income 1,478 Cash dividends declared ($0.29 per share) – – (87) – – – (87) Employee incentive plans and other (2,767,257 shares issued) – 162 – – (1) (16) 145 Amortization of deferred compensation – – – – – 16 16 BALANCE AT MAY 31, 2005 $30 $ 1,241 $8,363 $(17) $ (1) $(28) $ 9,588 The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements. 63


  • Page 29

    FEDEX CORPORATION NOTE 1: DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS AND SUMMARY OF REVENUE RECOGNITION SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES Revenue is recognized upon delivery of shipments or the com- pletion of the service for our office and print services, logistics DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS and trade services businesses. For shipments in transit, revenue FedEx Corporation (“FedEx”) provides a broad portfolio of trans- is recorded based on the percentage of service completed at the portation, e-commerce and business services through operating balance sheet date. Estimates for future billing adjustments to companies that compete collectively and are managed collabo- revenue and accounts receivable are recognized at the time of ratively under the respected FedEx brands. Our operations are shipment for money-back service guarantees and billing correc- primarily represented by Federal Express Corporation (“FedEx tions. Delivery costs are accrued as incurred. Express”), the world’s largest express transportation company; FedEx Ground Package System, Inc. (“FedEx Ground”), a leading Our contract logistics, global trade services and certain trans- provider of small-package ground delivery services; FedEx portation businesses engage in some transactions wherein they Freight Corporation (“FedEx Freight”), a leading U.S. provider of act as agents. Revenue from these transactions is recorded on a regional less-than-truckload (“LTL”) freight services; and FedEx net basis. Net revenue includes billings to customers less third- Kinko’s Office and Print Services, Inc. (“FedEx Kinko’s”), a leading party charges, including transportation or handling costs, fees, provider of document solutions and business services. These commissions, and taxes and duties. businesses form the core of our reportable segments. ADVERTISING Other business units in the FedEx portfolio are FedEx Trade Advertising costs are expensed as incurred and are classified in Networks, Inc. (“FedEx Trade Networks”), a global trade ser- other operating expenses. Advertising expenses were $326 million, vices company; FedEx SmartPost, Inc. (“FedEx SmartPost”), a $284 million and $249 million in 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively. small-parcel consolidator; FedEx Supply Chain Services, Inc. (“FedEx Supply Chain Services”), a contract logistics provider; CASH EQUIVALENTS FedEx Custom Critical, Inc. (“FedEx Custom Critical”), a critical- Cash equivalents in excess of current operating requirements are shipment carrier; Caribbean Transportation Services, Inc. invested in short-term, interest-bearing instruments with maturi- (“Caribbean Transportation Services”), a provider of airfreight ties of three months or less at the date of purchase and are forwarding services, and FedEx Corporate Services, Inc. (“FedEx stated at cost, which approximates market value. Services”), a provider of customer-facing sales, marketing and information technology functions, primarily for FedEx Express SPARE PARTS, SUPPLIES AND FUEL and FedEx Ground. Spare parts are stated principally at weighted-average cost. Supplies and fuel are stated principally at standard cost, which FISCAL YEARS approximates actual cost on a first-in, first-out basis. Allowances Except as otherwise specified, references to years indicate for obsolescence are provided, over the estimated useful life of our fiscal year ended May 31, 2005 or ended May 31 of the year the related aircraft and engines, for spare parts expected to be referenced. on hand at the date the aircraft are retired from service, and for spare parts currently identified as excess or obsolete. These PRINCIPLES OF CONSOLIDATION allowances are based on management estimates, which are The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of subject to change. FedEx and its subsidiaries, substantially all of which are wholly owned. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT have been eliminated. Expenditures for major additions, improvements, flight equipment modifications and certain equipment overhaul costs are capital- RECLASSIFICATIONS ized when such costs are determined to extend the useful life Certain reclassifications have been made to prior year financial of the asset or are part of the cost of acquiring the asset. statements to conform to the current year presentation. Maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred, except for certain aircraft-related major maintenance costs on one CREDIT RISK of our aircraft fleet types, which are capitalized and amortized over We routinely grant credit to many of our customers for transporta- their estimated service lives. The net book value of these capital- tion and business services without collateral. The risk of credit loss ized major maintenance costs at May 31, 2005 and 2004 was $60 in our trade receivables is substantially mitigated by our credit million and $71 million, respectively. We capitalize certain direct evaluation process, short collection terms and sales to a large internal and external costs associated with the development of number of customers, as well as the low revenue per transaction internal use software. Gains and losses on sales of property used for most of our services. Allowances for potential credit losses in operations are classified with depreciation and amortization. are determined based on historical experience and current eval- uation of the composition of accounts receivable. Historically, credit losses have been within management’s expectations. 64


  • Page 30

    NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS For financial reporting purposes, depreciation and amortization PENSION AND POSTRETIREMENT HEALTHCARE PLANS of property and equipment is provided on a straight-line basis These defined benefit plans are measured as of the last day of over the asset’s service life or related lease term. For income tax our fiscal third quarter of each year using actuarial techniques purposes, depreciation is generally computed using accelerated that reflect estimates for mortality, turnover and expected retire- methods. The depreciable lives and net book value of our property ment. In addition, management makes assumptions concerning and equipment is as follows (dollars in millions): future salary increases, future expected long-term returns on plan Net Book Value at May 31, assets and future increases in healthcare costs. Discount rates Range 2005 2004 are established as of the measurement date using theoretical Wide-body aircraft bond models that select high-grade corporate bonds with cash and related equipment 15 to 25 years $ 3,948 $ 3,587 flows that correlate to the expected payouts of the applicable lia- Narrow-body and feeder bilities. A calculated-value method is employed for purposes of aircraft and determining the expected return on the plan asset component of related equipment 5 to 15 years 330 332 net periodic pension cost for our qualified U.S. pension plans. Package handling and Generally, we do not fund defined benefit plans when such fund- ground support equipment 3 to 30 years 938 1,135 ing provides no current tax deduction. Computer and electronic equipment 3 to 10 years 758 769 GOODWILL Vehicles 3 to 12 years 718 711 Goodwill is recognized for the excess of the purchase price over Facilities and other 2 to 40 years 2,951 2,503 the fair value of tangible and identifiable intangible net assets of businesses acquired. Goodwill is reviewed at least annually for Substantially all property and equipment have no material resid- impairment by comparing the fair value of each reporting unit ual values. The majority of aircraft costs are depreciated on a with its carrying value (including attributable goodwill). Fair value straight-line basis over 15 to 18 years. We periodically evaluate is determined using a discounted cash flow methodology. Unless the estimated service lives and residual values used to depreci- circumstances otherwise dictate, we perform our annual impair- ate our property and equipment. This evaluation may result ment testing in the fourth quarter. in changes in the estimated lives and residual values. Such changes did not materially affect depreciation expense in any INTANGIBLE ASSETS period presented. Depreciation expense, excluding gains and Amortizable intangible assets include customer relationships, losses on sales of property and equipment used in operations, technology assets and contract-based intangibles acquired was $1.438 billion, $1.361 billion and $1.334 billion in 2005, 2004 and in business combinations. Amortizable intangible assets are 2003, respectively. Depreciation and amortization expense amortized over periods ranging from 2 to 15 years, either on a includes amortization of assets under capital lease. straight-line basis or an accelerated basis depending upon the pattern in which the economic benefits are realized. Non- CAPITALIZED INTEREST amortizing intangible assets consist of the Kinko’s trade name. Interest on funds used to finance the acquisition and modification Non-amortizing intangibles are reviewed at least annually for of aircraft, construction of certain facilities and development of impairment. Unless circumstances otherwise dictate, we perform certain software up to the date the asset is ready for its intended our annual impairment testing in the fourth quarter. use is capitalized and included in the cost of the asset if the asset is actively under construction. Capitalized interest was $22 mil- INCOME TAXES lion in 2005, $11 million in 2004 and $16 million in 2003. Deferred income taxes are provided for the tax effect of tempo- rary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities IMPAIRMENT OF LONG-LIVED ASSETS and their reported amounts in the financial statements. The lia- Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment when circum- bility method is used to account for income taxes, which requires stances indicate the carrying value of an asset may not be deferred taxes to be recorded at the statutory rate in effect when recoverable. For assets that are to be held and used, an impair- the taxes are paid. ment is recognized when the estimated undiscounted cash flows We have not recognized deferred taxes for U.S. federal income associated with the asset or group of assets is less than their taxes on foreign subsidiaries’ earnings that are deemed to be carrying value. If impairment exists, an adjustment is made to permanently reinvested and any related taxes associated with write the asset down to its fair value, and a loss is recorded as such earnings are not material. Pretax earnings of foreign opera- the difference between the carrying value and fair value. Fair val- tions for 2005, 2004, and 2003 were approximately $636 million, ues are determined based on quoted market values, discounted $430 million and $140 million, respectively, which represent only a cash flows or internal and external appraisals, as applicable. portion of total results associated with international shipments. Assets to be disposed of are carried at the lower of carrying value or estimated net realizable value. 65


  • Page 31

    FEDEX CORPORATION SELF-INSURANCE ACCRUALS December 2004. Because we could no longer conclude that col- We are primarily self-insured for workers’ compensation claims, lection of the entire $119 million recorded in 2002 was probable, vehicle accidents and general liabilities, benefits paid under we recorded a charge of $48 million in the second quarter of 2005, employee healthcare programs and long-term disability benefits. representing the DOT’s repayment demand of $29 million and the Accruals are primarily based on the actuarially estimated, write-off of a $19 million receivable. We are vigorously contesting undiscounted cost of claims, which includes incurred-but- this determination judicially and will continue to aggressively pur- not-reported claims. Current workers’ compensation claims, sue our compensation claim. Should any additional amounts vehicle and general liability, employee healthcare claims and ultimately be recovered by FedEx Express on this matter, they will long-term disability are included in accrued expenses. We self- be recognized in the period that they are realized. insure up to certain limits that vary by operating company and type of risk. Periodically, we evaluate the level of insurance STOCK COMPENSATION coverage and adjust insurance levels based on risk tolerance We currently apply Accounting Principles Board Opinion No. and premium expense. (“APB”) 25, “Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees,” and its related interpretations to measure compensation expense for DEFERRED LEASE OBLIGATIONS stock-based compensation plans. As a result, no compensation While certain aircraft, facility and retail location leases contain expense is recorded for stock options when the exercise price is fluctuating or escalating payments, the related rent expense is equal to or greater than the market price of our common stock at recorded on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The deferred the date of grant. For awards of restricted stock and to deter- lease obligation is the net cumulative excess of rent expense over mine the pro forma effects of stock options set forth below, we rent payments. recognize the fair value of the awards ratably over their explicit service period. DEFERRED GAINS If compensation cost for stock-based compensation plans had Gains on the sale and leaseback of aircraft and other property been determined under Statement of Financial Accounting and equipment are deferred and amortized ratably over the life Standards No. (“SFAS”) 123, “Accounting for Stock Based of the lease as a reduction of rent expense. Substantially all of Compensation,” stock option compensation expense, pro forma these deferred gains were related to aircraft transactions. net income and basic and diluted earnings per common share for 2005, 2004 and 2003 assuming all options granted in 1996 and EMPLOYEES UNDER COLLECTIVE BARGAINING thereafter were valued at fair value using the Black-Scholes ARRANGEMENTS method, would have been as follows (in millions, except per The pilots of FedEx Express, which represent a small number of share amounts): FedEx Express total employees, are employed under a collective Years ended May 31, 2005 2004 2003 bargaining agreement that became amendable on May 31, 2004. In accordance with applicable labor law, we will continue to Net income, as reported $1,449 $ 838 $ 830 operate under our current agreement while we negotiate with Add: Stock compensation included in our pilots. Contract negotiations with the pilots’ union began in reported net income, net of tax 4 10 – March 2004 and are ongoing. We cannot estimate the financial Deduct: Total stock-based impact, if any, the results of these negotiations may have on our employee compensation expense future results of operations. determined under fair value based method for all awards, AIRLINE STABILIZATION ACT CHARGE net of tax benefit 40 37 34 During the second quarter of 2005, the United States Department Pro forma net income $1,413 $ 811 $ 796 of Transportation (“DOT”) issued a final order in its administra- Earnings per common share: tive review of the FedEx Express claim for compensation under Basic – as reported $ 4.81 $ 2.80 $ 2.79 the Air Transportation Safety and System Stabilization Act Basic – pro forma $ 4.69 $ 2.71 $ 2.67 (“Act”). Under its interpretation of the Act, the DOT determined Diluted – as reported $ 4.72 $ 2.76 $ 2.74 that FedEx Express was entitled to $72 million of compensation, Diluted – pro forma $ 4.60 $ 2.68 $ 2.63 an increase of $3 million from its initial determination. Because we had previously received $101 million under the Act, the See Note 10 for a discussion of the assumptions underlying the DOT demanded repayment of $29 million which was made in pro forma calculations above. 66


  • Page 32

    NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSLATION to be reported as a financing cash flow, rather than as an operat- Translation gains and losses of foreign operations that use local ing cash flow as required under current standards. Based on currencies as the functional currency are accumulated and historical experience, we do not expect the impact of adopting reported, net of applicable deferred income taxes, as a compo- SFAS 123R to be material to our reported cash flows. nent of accumulated other comprehensive loss within common stockholders’ investment. Transaction gains and losses that arise NOTE 3: BUSINESS COMBINATIONS from exchange rate fluctuations on transactions denominated in FEDEX SMARTPOST a currency other than the local currency are included in results of On September 12, 2004, we acquired the assets and assumed operations. Cumulative net foreign currency translation gains and certain liabilities of FedEx SmartPost (formerly known as Parcel (losses) in accumulated other comprehensive loss were $14 mil- Direct), a division of a privately held company, for $122 million in lion, ($13) million and ($13) million at May 31, 2005, 2004 and cash. FedEx SmartPost is a leading small-parcel consolidator and 2003, respectively. broadens our portfolio of services by allowing us to offer a cost effective option for delivering low-weight, less time-sensitive USE OF ESTIMATES packages to U.S. residences through the U.S. Postal Service. The The preparation of our consolidated financial statements requires financial results of FedEx SmartPost are included in the FedEx the use of estimates and assumptions that affect the reported Ground segment from the date of its acquisition and are not mate- amounts of assets and liabilities, the reported amounts of rev- rial to reported or pro forma results of operations of any period. enues and expenses and the disclosure of contingent liabilities. Management makes its best estimate of the ultimate outcome for The excess cost over the estimated fair value of the assets these items based on historical trends and other information acquired and liabilities assumed (approximately $20 million) has available when the financial statements are prepared. Changes in been recorded as goodwill, which is entirely attributed to FedEx estimates are recognized in accordance with the accounting Ground. The allocation of the purchase price to the fair value of rules for the estimate, which is typically in the period when new the assets acquired, liabilities assumed and goodwill was based information becomes available to management. Areas where the primarily on internal estimates and independent appraisals. nature of the estimate makes it reasonably possible that actual The purchase price was allocated as follows (in millions): results could materially differ from amounts estimated include: self-insurance accruals; employee retirement plan obligations; Current assets, primarily accounts receivable $ 10 tax liabilities; accounts receivable allowances; obsolescence of Property and equipment 91 spare parts; contingent liabilities; and impairment assessments Intangible assets 10 on long-lived assets (including goodwill and indefinite lived Goodwill 20 intangible assets). Current liabilities (9) Total purchase price $122 NOTE 2: RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS FEDEX KINKO’S On December 16, 2004, the Financial Accounting Standards On February 12, 2004, we acquired FedEx Kinko’s for approxi- Board (“FASB”) issued SFAS 123R, “Share-Based Payment.” mately $2.4 billion in cash. We also assumed $39 million of SFAS 123R is a revision of SFAS 123 and supersedes APB 25. The capital lease obligations. FedEx Kinko’s is a leading provider of new standard requires companies to record compensation document solutions and business services. Its network of world- expense for stock-based awards using a fair value method and wide locations offers access to color printing, finishing and is effective for annual periods beginning after June 15, 2005 presentation services, Internet access, videoconferencing, (effective in 2007 for FedEx). Compensation expense will be outsourcing, managed services, Web-based printing and docu- recorded over the requisite service period, which is typically the ment management solutions. vesting period of the award. We plan to adopt this standard using the modified prospective basis. The allocation of the purchase price to the fair value of the assets acquired, liabilities assumed and goodwill, as well as the assign- The impact of the adoption of SFAS 123R cannot be predicted at ment of goodwill to our reportable segments, was based primarily this time because it will depend on levels of share-based payments on internal estimates of cash flows and independent appraisals. granted in the future, as well as the assumptions and the fair value We used an independent appraisal firm to determine the fair model used to value them, and the market value of our common value of certain assets and liabilities, primarily property and stock. If applied to 2005 and 2004, the impact of that standard equipment and acquired intangible assets, including the value of would have materially approximated that of SFAS 123 as presented the Kinko’s trade name, customer-related intangibles, technology in Note 1 (reducing earnings per diluted share in 2005 and 2004 by assets and contract-based intangibles. $0.12 and $0.08, respectively.) SFAS 123R also requires the bene- fits of tax deductions in excess of recognized compensation cost 67


  • Page 33

    FEDEX CORPORATION Approximately $1.8 billion was recorded as goodwill, as the acqui- The following unaudited pro forma consolidated financial infor- sition expands our portfolio of business services, while providing a mation presents the combined results of operations of FedEx and substantially enhanced capability to provide package-shipping FedEx Kinko’s as if the acquisition had occurred at the beginning services to small- and medium-sized business customers through of 2003. The unaudited pro forma results have been prepared for FedEx Kinko’s network of retail locations. Because this was an comparative purposes only. Adjustments were made to the acquisition of stock, goodwill is not deductible for tax purposes. combined results of operations, primarily related to higher depre- Approximately $130 million of the goodwill was attributed to the ciation and amortization expense resulting from higher property FedEx Express segment and $70 million was attributed to the and equipment values and acquired intangible assets and addi- FedEx Ground segment based on the expected increase in each tional interest expense resulting from acquisition debt. The segment’s fair value as a result of the acquisition. accounting literature establishes firm guidelines around how this pro forma information is presented, which precludes the assump- The purchase price was allocated as follows (in millions): tion of business synergies. Therefore, this unaudited pro forma Current assets, primarily accounts receivable information is not intended to represent, nor do we believe it is and inventory $ 241 indicative of the consolidated results of operations of FedEx that Property and equipment 328 would have been reported had the acquisition been completed Goodwill 1,751 as of the beginning of 2003. Furthermore, this pro forma informa- Intangible asset with an indefinite life 567 tion is not representative of the future consolidated results of Amortizing intangible assets 82 operations of FedEx. Other long-term assets 52 Pro forma unaudited results were as follows (in millions, except Total assets aquired 3,021 per share data): Years ended May 31, Current liabilities (298) 2004(1) 2003 Deferred income taxes (267) Long-term capital lease obligations and other Revenues $26,056 $ 24,427 long-term liabilities (36) Net income 836 841 Total liabilities assumed (601) Basic earnings per common share 2.80 2.82 Total purchase price $ 2,420 Diluted earnings per common share 2.75 2.78 (1) Includes $27 million, net of tax, of nonrecurring expenses at FedEx Kinko’s, primarily Indefinite lived intangible asset. This intangible asset represents in anticipation of the acquisition. Also includes $270 million, net of tax, of business realignment costs and a $37 million, net of tax, nonrecurring tax benefit at FedEx. the estimated fair value allocated to the Kinko’s trade name. This intangible asset will not be amortized because it has an indefinite We paid a portion of the purchase price from available cash bal- remaining useful life based on the length of time that the Kinko’s ances. To finance the remainder of the purchase price, we issued name had been in use, the Kinko’s brand awareness and market commercial paper backed by a six-month $2 billion credit facility. position and our plans for continued use of the Kinko’s brand. In March 2004, we issued $1.6 billion of senior unsecured notes in Amortizable intangible assets. These intangible assets represent three maturity tranches: one, three and five years at $600 million, the fair value associated with the business expected to be gen- $500 million and $500 million, respectively. Net proceeds from the erated from existing customer relationships and contracts as of borrowings were used to repay the commercial paper backed by the acquisition date. The fair value of these assets was primarily the six-month credit facility. We canceled the six-month credit determined by measuring the present value of the projected facility in March 2004. See Note 7 for further discussion. future earnings attributable to these assets. Substantially all of These acquisitions were accounted for under the purchase these assets are being amortized on an accelerated basis over method of accounting. The operating results of the acquired busi- an estimated useful life of approximately seven years. While the nesses are included in our consolidated results of operations useful life of these customer-relationship assets is not limited from the date of acquisition. by contract or any other economic, regulatory or other known factors, the useful life of seven years was determined at the acquisition date based on customer attrition patterns. 68


  • Page 34

    NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 4: GOODWILL AND INTANGIBLES The carrying amount of goodwill attributable to each reportable operating segment and changes therein follows (in millions): Goodwill Goodwill Purchase May 31, Acquired During May 31, Acquired During Adjustments and May 31, 2003 2004 2004 2005 Other 2005 FedEx Express segment $ 397 $ 130 (1) $ 527 $ – $ 1 $ 528 FedEx Ground segment – 70 (1) 70 20 (2) – 90 FedEx Freight segment 666 – 666 – – 666 FedEx Kinko’s segment – 1,539 1,539 – 12 1,551 $1,063 $1,739 $ 2,802 $ 20 $13 $ 2,835 (1) FedEx Kinko’s acquisition. (2) FedEx SmartPost acquisition. The components of our intangible assets were as follows (in The components of our business realignment costs and changes millions): May 31, 2005 May 31, 2004 in the related accruals were as follows for the year ended May Gross Carrying Accumulated Gross Carrying Accumulated 31, 2004 (in millions): Amount Amortization Amount Amortization Voluntary Voluntary Amortizable Retirement Severance Other (1) Total intangible assets Accrual balances at Customer relationships $ 77 $(16) $ 72 $ (3) May 31, 2003 $ – $ – $ – $ – Contract related 79 (50) 79 (43) Charged to expense 202 158 75 435 Technology related Cash paid (8) (152) (31) (191) and other 51 (23) 45 (17) Amounts charged to other Total $ 207 $(89) $196 $ (63) assets/liabilities (2) (194) – (22) (216) Non-amortizing Accrual balances intangible asset at May 31, 2004 $ – $ 6 $ 22 $ 28 Kinko’s trade name $ 567 $ – $567 $ – (1) Other includes costs for management severance agreements, which are payable over future periods, including compensation related to the modification of previously granted stock options and incremental pension and healthcare benefits. Other also Amortization expense for intangible assets was $26 million in includes professional fees directly associated with the business realignment initiatives 2005, $14 million in 2004 and $13 million in 2003. Estimated amorti- and relocation costs. zation expense for the next five years is as follows (in millions): (2) Amounts charged to other assets and liabilities relate primarily to incremental pension and healthcare benefits. 2006 $ 25 2007 23 No material costs related to these programs were incurred dur- 2008 21 ing 2005. At May 31, 2004, we had remaining business realignment 2009 18 related accruals of $28 million. The remaining accruals relate to 2010 16 management severance agreements, which are payable over future periods. At May 31, 2005, these accruals had decreased to NOTE 5: BUSINESS REALIGNMENT COSTS $7 million due predominantly to cash payments made during 2005. During the first half of 2004, voluntary early retirement incentives with enhanced pension and postretirement healthcare benefits NOTE 6: SELECTED CURRENT LIABILITIES were offered to certain groups of employees at FedEx Express The components of selected current liability captions were as who were age 50 or older. Voluntary cash severance incentives follows (in millions): May 31, were also offered to eligible employees at FedEx Express. These 2005 2004 programs were limited to eligible U.S. salaried staff employees Accrued Salaries and Employee Benefits and managers. Approximately 3,600 employees accepted offers Salaries $ 171 $ 163 under these programs. Costs were also incurred for the elimina- Employee benefits 689 496 tion of certain management positions, primarily at FedEx Express Compensated absences 415 403 and FedEx Services, based on the staff reductions from the vol- $1,275 $1,062 untary programs and other cost reduction initiatives. Costs for the Accrued Expenses benefits provided under the voluntary programs were recognized Self-insurance accruals $ 483 $ 442 in the period that eligible employees accepted the offer. Other Taxes other than income taxes 288 291 costs associated with business realignment activities were Other 580 647 recognized in the period incurred. $1,351 $1,380 69


  • Page 35

    FEDEX CORPORATION NOTE 7: LONG-TERM DEBT AND OTHER FINANCING To finance our acquisition of FedEx Kinko’s in 2004, we entered ARRANGEMENTS into a six-month $2 billion credit facility. During February 2004, we issued commercial paper backed by unused commitments under The components of our long-term debt were as follows (in this facility. In March 2004, we issued $1.6 billion of senior millions): May 31, unsecured notes in three maturity tranches: one, three and five 2005 2004 years, at $600 million, $500 million and $500 million, respectively. Unsecured debt $ 2,255 $2,855 Net proceeds from these borrowings were used to repay the Capital lease obligations 401 534 commercial paper backed by the six-month credit facility. We Other debt, interest rates of 2.46% to 9.98% canceled the six-month credit facility in March 2004. due through 2008 140 198 2,796 3,587 Capital lease obligations include certain special facility revenue Less current portion 369 750 bonds that have been issued by municipalities primarily to $ 2,427 $2,837 finance the acquisition and construction of various airport facil- ities and equipment. These bonds require interest payments at At May 31, 2005 and 2004, we had two revolving bank credit facil- least annually, with principal payments due at the end of the ities totaling $1 billion which were undrawn. One revolver related lease agreements. In addition, during 2004, FedEx provides for $750 million through September 28, 2006. The second Express amended two leases for MD11 aircraft, which required is a 364-day facility providing for $250 million which expires on FedEx Express to record $110 million in both fixed assets and September 22, 2005 and is extendable for one additional year long-term liabilities. During 2003, FedEx Express amended four through September 21, 2006. Interest rates on borrowings under leases for MD11 aircraft, which commits FedEx Express to firm the agreements are generally determined by maturities selected purchase obligations for two of these aircraft during both 2005 and prevailing market conditions. Borrowings under the credit and 2006. As a result, the amended leases were accounted for agreements will bear interest, at our option, at a rate per annum as capital leases, which added $221 million to both fixed assets equal to either (a) the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) and long-term liabilities at May 31, 2003. Two of these aircraft plus a credit spread, or (b) the higher of the Federal Funds were paid off in 2005 when the purchase obligation became due. Effective Rate, as defined, plus 1/2 of 1%, or the bank’s Prime Other long-term debt includes $125 million related to two leased Rate. The revolving credit agreements contain certain covenants MD11 aircraft that are consolidated under the provisions of and restrictions, none of which are expected to significantly Financial Accounting Standards Board Interpretation No. (“FIN”) affect our operations or ability to pay dividends. 46, “Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities, an Interpretation From time to time, we finance certain operating and investing of ARB No. 51.” The debt requires interest at LIBOR plus a margin activities, including acquisitions, through the issuance of com- and is due in installments through March 30, 2007. See Note 17 mercial paper. Our commercial paper program is backed by for further discussion. unused commitments under our revolving credit facilities and We issue other financial instruments in the normal course of reduces the amounts available under the facilities. As of May 31, business to support our operations. Letters of credit at May 31, 2005 and 2004, no commercial paper borrowings were outstand- 2005 were $580 million. The amount unused under our letter of ing and the entire $1 billion under the revolving credit agreements credit facility totaled approximately $39 million at May 31, 2005. was available. This facility expires in May of 2006. These instruments are gen- The components of unsecured debt (net of discounts) were as erally required under certain U.S. self-insurance programs and follows (in millions): are used in the normal course of international operations. The May 31, 2005 2004 underlying liabilities insured by these instruments are reflected in the balance sheet, where applicable. Therefore, no additional Senior unsecured debt liability is reflected for the letters of credit. Interest rate of three-month LIBOR (1.11% at May 31, 2004) plus 0.28%, Scheduled annual principal maturities of debt, exclusive of capi- due in 2005 $ – $ 600 tal leases, for the five years subsequent to May 31, 2005, are as Interest rate of 7.80%, due in 2007 200 200 follows (in millions): Interest rate of 2.65%, due in 2007 500 500 2006 $265 Interest rate of 3.50%, due in 2009 499 499 2007 844 Interest rates of 6.63% to 7.25%, 2008 – due through 2011 499 499 2009 499 Interest rate of 9.65%, due in 2013 299 299 2010 – Interest rate of 7.60%, due in 2098 239 239 Other notes, due through 2007 19 19 $2,255 $2,855 70


  • Page 36

    NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Long-term debt, exclusive of capital leases, had carrying values of A summary of future minimum lease payments under noncan- $2.4 billion and $3.0 billion at May 31, 2005 and 2004, respectively, celable operating leases (principally aircraft, retail locations and compared with estimated fair values of approximately $2.6 billion facilities) with an initial or remaining term in excess of one year and $3.2 billion at those respective dates. The estimated fair val- at May 31, 2005 is as follows (in millions): ues were determined based on quoted market prices or on the Aircraft and Related Facilities and current rates offered for debt with similar terms and maturities. Equipment Other Total 2006 $ 607 $ 1,039 $ 1,646 We have a $1.0 billion shelf registration statement with the SEC to 2007 606 912 1,518 provide flexibility and efficiency when obtaining financing. Under 2008 585 771 1,356 this shelf registration statement we may issue, in one or more 2009 555 636 1,191 offerings, either unsecured debt securities, common stock or a 2010 544 501 1,045 combination of such instruments. The entire $1 billion is available Thereafter 4,460 2,789 7,249 for future financings. $ 7,357 $ 6,648 $14,005 NOTE 8: LEASE COMMITMENTS The weighted-average remaining lease term of all operating leases We utilize certain aircraft, land, facilities, retail locations and outstanding at May 31, 2005 was approximately six years. While equipment under capital and operating leases that expire at var- certain of our lease agreements contain covenants governing the ious dates through 2039. In addition, supplemental aircraft are use of the leased assets or require us to maintain certain levels of leased under agreements that generally provide for cancelation insurance, none of our lease agreements include material finan- upon 30 days’ notice. cial covenants or limitations. The components of property and equipment recorded under cap- FedEx Express makes payments under certain leveraged oper- ital leases were as follows (in millions): May 31, ating leases that are sufficient to pay principal and interest 2005 2004 on certain pass-through certificates. The pass-through certifi- Aircraft $232 $ 344 cates are not direct obligations of, or guaranteed by, FedEx or Package handling and ground support FedEx Express. equipment 167 168 Vehicles 36 39 NOTE 9: PREFERRED STOCK Other, principally facilities 167 230 Our Certificate of Incorporation authorizes the Board of Directors, 602 781 at its discretion, to issue up to 4,000,000 shares of preferred stock. Less accumulated amortization 329 390 The stock is issuable in series, which may vary as to certain $273 $ 391 rights and preferences, and has no par value. As of May 31, 2005, none of these shares had been issued. Rent expense under operating leases was as follows (in millions): For years ended May 31, NOTE 10: COMMON STOCKHOLDERS’ INVESTMENT 2005 2004 2003 Minimum rentals $1,793 $1,560 $1,522 TREASURY SHARES Contingent rentals 235 143 107 The following table summarizes information about treasury share $2,028 $1,703 $1,629 repurchases for the years ended May 31: Average Price Shares Per Share Contingent rentals are based on equipment usage. 2005 – $ – A summary of future minimum lease payments under capital leases 2004 2,625,000 68.14 at May 31, 2005 is as follows (in millions): 2003 3,275,000 56.66 2006 $ 121 These repurchases were done under share repurchase programs 2007 22 aggregating 15 million shares. A total of 5.75 million shares 2008 99 remain under existing share repurchase authorizations. At May 2009 11 31, 2005 and 2004, respectively, 18,111 and 4,760 shares remained 2010 96 outstanding in treasury. Thereafter 130 479 Less amount representing interest 78 Present value of net minimum lease payments $ 401 71


  • Page 37

    FEDEX CORPORATION STOCK COMPENSATION PLANS Expected Lives. This is the period of time over which the options granted are expected to remain outstanding. Generally, options Stock Options Plan granted have a maximum term of 10 years. We examine actual Under the provisions of our stock incentive plans, key employees stock option exercises to determine the expected life of the and non-employee directors may be granted options to purchase options. An increase in the expected term will increase compen- shares of common stock at a price not less than its fair market sation expense. value at the date of grant. Options granted have a maximum term of 10 years. Vesting requirements are determined at the discre- Expected Volatility. Actual changes in the market value of our tion of the Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors. stock are used to calculate the volatility assumption. We calcu- Option-vesting periods range from one to four years with more late daily market value changes from the date of grant over a past than 80% of stock option grants vesting ratably over four years. period equal to the expected life of the options to determine At May 31, 2005, there were 3,589,600 shares available for future volatility. An increase in the expected volatility will increase com- grants under these plans. pensation expense. The weighted-average fair value of these grants, calculated Risk-Free Interest Rate. This is the U.S. Treasury Strip rate posted using the Black-Scholes valuation method under the assumptions at the date of grant having a term equal to the expected life of the indicated below, was $20.37, $18.02 and $17.12 per option in 2005, option. An increase in the risk-free interest rate will increase 2004 and 2003, respectively. compensation expense. We are required to disclose the pro forma effect of accounting Dividend Yield. This is the annual rate of dividends per share for stock options using such a valuation method for all options over the exercise price of the option. In July 2002, we paid the granted in 1996 and thereafter (see Note 1). We use the Black- first dividend in the history of the company. Therefore, the fair Scholes option-pricing model to calculate the fair value of options value of options prior to 2003 is not affected by the dividend yield. for our pro forma disclosures. The key assumptions for this valu- An increase in the dividend yield will decrease compensation ation method include the expected life of the option, stock price expense. volatility, risk-free interest rate, dividend yield, forfeiture rate and Forfeiture Rate. This is the estimated percentage of options exercise price. Many of these assumptions are judgmental and granted that are expected to be forfeited or canceled before highly sensitive in the determination of pro forma compensation becoming fully vested. This percentage is derived from historical expense. Following is a table of the key weighted-average experience. An increase in the forfeiture rate will decrease com- assumptions used in the option valuation calculations for the pensation expense. Our forfeiture rate is approximately 8%. options granted in the three years ended May 31, and a discus- sion of our methodology for developing each of the assumptions used in the valuation model: 2005 2004 2003 Expected lives 4 years 4 years 4 years Expected volatility 27% 32% 35% Risk-free interest rate 3.559% 2.118% 4.017% Dividend yield 0.3215% 0.3102% 0.3785% The following table summarizes information about our stock option plans for the years ended May 31: 2005 2004 2003 Weighted- Weighted- Weighted- Average Average Average Exercise Exercise Exercise Shares Price Shares Price Shares Price Outstanding at beginning of year 17,349,307 $46.39 17,315,116 $38.88 17,306,014 $34.32 Granted 2,718,651 76.21 3,937,628 64.96 3,261,800 53.22 Exercised (2,540,324) 39.14 (3,724,605) 31.05 (2,951,154) 27.73 Forfeited (168,252) 63.27 (178,832) 46.71 (301,544) 40.47 Outstanding at end of year 17,359,382 51.96 17,349,307 46.39 17,315,116 38.88 Exercisable at end of year 9,660,334 42.34 8,747,523 38.28 8,829,515 33.58 72


  • Page 38

    NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS The following table summarizes information about stock options outstanding at May 31, 2005: Options Outstanding Options Exercisable Weighted- Weighted- Weighted- Average Average Average Range of Number Remaining Exercise Number Exercise Exercise Price Outstanding Contractual Life Price Exercisable Price $15.34 – $23.01 595,402 1.1 years $19.35 595,402 $19.35 23.17 – 34.76 2,035,885 2.7 years 29.84 2,035,885 29.84 35.00 – 52.50 4,861,199 5.6 years 40.23 3,886,522 39.85 53.46 – 80.19 9,464,196 7.5 years 62.99 3,142,525 57.89 84.98 – 100.20 402,700 9.5 years 94.12 – – 15.34 – 100.20 17,359,382 6.3 years 51.96 9,660,334 42.34 Total equity compensation shares outstanding or available for grant represented approximately 6.8% and 7.1% of total outstanding com- mon and equity compensation shares and equity compensation shares available for grant at May 31, 2005 and May 31, 2004, respectively. Stock Options Expensed. Under our business realignment programs discussed in Note 5, we recognized approximately $6 million and $16 million of expense ($4 million and $10 million, net of tax) during 2005 and 2004, respectively, related to the modification of previously granted stock options. We calculated this expense using the Black-Scholes method. Restricted Stock Plans Under the terms of our restricted stock plans, shares of common stock are awarded to key employees. All restrictions on the shares expire ratably over a four-year period. Shares are valued at the market price at the date of award. Compensation related to these plans is recorded as a reduction of common stockholders’ investment and is amortized to expense over the explicit service period. The following table summarizes information about restricted stock awards for the years ended May 31: 2005 2004 2003 Weighted- Weighted- Weighted- Average Average Average Shares Fair Value Shares Fair Value Shares Fair Value Awarded 218,273 $80.24 282,423 $ 67.11 343,500 $ 47.56 Forfeited 21,354 55.41 10,000 43.41 17,438 48.01 At May 31, 2005, there were 550,634 shares available for future awards under these plans. Annual compensation cost for the restricted stock plans was approximately $16 million for 2005, $14 million for 2004, and $12 million for 2003. NOTE 11: COMPUTATION OF EARNINGS PER SHARE The calculation of basic earnings per common share and diluted earnings per common share for the years ended May 31 was as fol- lows (in millions, except per share amounts): 2005 2004 2003 Net income applicable to common stockholders $1,449 $ 838 $ 830 Weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding 301 299 298 Common equivalent shares: Assumed exercise of outstanding dilutive options 18 19 15 Less shares repurchased from proceeds of assumed exercise of options (12) (14) (10) Weighted-average common and common equivalent shares outstanding 307 304 303 Basic earnings per common share $ 4.81 $ 2.80 $ 2.79 Diluted earnings per common share $ 4.72 $ 2.76 $ 2.74 73


  • Page 39

    FEDEX CORPORATION NOTE 12: INCOME TAXES The significant components of deferred tax assets and liabilities as of May 31 were as follows (in millions): The components of the provision for income taxes for the years 2005 2004 ended May 31 were as follows (in millions): Deferred Deferred Deferred Deferred 2005 2004 2003 Tax Assets Tax Liabilities Tax Assets Tax Liabilities Current provision Property, equipment, Domestic: leases and intangibles $ 301 $1,455 $ 310 $1,372 Federal $634 $371 $ 112 Employee benefits 397 453 386 406 State and local 65 54 28 Self-insurance accruals 311 – 297 – Foreign 103 85 39 Other 319 128 277 104 802 510 179 Net operating loss/credit Deferred provision (benefit) carryforwards 54 – 47 – Domestic: Valuation allowance (42) – (52) – Federal 67 (22) 304 $1,340 $2,036 $1,265 $1,882 State and local (4) (7) 25 Foreign (1) – – The net deferred tax liability of $696 million for 2005 and $617 62 (29) 329 million for 2004 has been classified in the balance sheet as a $864 $481 $ 508 current deferred tax asset of $510 million and $489 million, and a noncurrent deferred tax liability of $1,206 million and $1,106 A reconciliation of the statutory federal income tax rate to the million, respectively. effective income tax rate for the years ended May 31 was as follows: The valuation allowance primarily represents amounts reserved 2005 2004 2003 for operating loss and tax credit carryforwards, which expire over Statutory U.S. income tax rate 35.0% 35.0% 35.0% varying periods starting in 2006. As a result of this and other fac- Increase resulting from: tors, we believe that a substantial portion of these deferred tax State and local income taxes, assets may not be realized. The net decrease in the valuation net of federal benefit 1.7 2.3 2.6 allowance of $10 million was principally due to the reduction of the Other, net 0.7 (0.8) 0.4 valuation allowance against certain foreign tax credits as a result Effective tax rate 37.4% 36.5% 38.0% of the passage of the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004, noted above, partially offset by an increase in the valuation allowance on The 37.4% effective tax rate in 2005 was favorably impacted ($12 certain capital loss and net operating loss carryover items. million tax benefit or $0.04 per diluted share) by the one-time In February 2005, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals reaffirmed the reduction of a valuation allowance on foreign tax credits arising favorable ruling from the U.S. District Court in Memphis regarding from certain of our international operations as a result of the pas- the tax treatment of jet engine maintenance costs, previously sage of the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 and by a lower received during the first quarter of 2004. The period during which effective state tax rate. The lower 36.5% effective rate in 2004 the U.S. Department of Justice could appeal the decision lapsed was primarily attributable to the favorable decision in the tax in May 2005, making the decision final. The district court held that case discussed below, stronger than anticipated international these costs were ordinary and necessary business expenses and results and the results of tax audits in 2004. Our stronger than properly deductible in our income tax returns. Neither the Sixth anticipated international results, along with other factors, Circuit’s decision nor the government’s decision not to pursue an increased our ability to credit income taxes paid to foreign gov- appeal had any impact on our financial condition, results of oper- ernments on foreign income against U.S. income taxes on the ations or tax rate during 2005. As a result of the District Court same income, thereby mitigating the exposure to double taxation. ruling, we recognized a one-time benefit of $26 million, net of tax, or $0.08 per diluted share in the first quarter of 2004, primarily related to the reduction of accruals and the recognition of inter- est earned on amounts previously paid to the IRS. These adjustments affected both net interest expense ($30 million pre- tax) and income tax expense ($7 million). We expect to receive a refund payment of approximately $80 million (before income taxes of approximately $16 million) from the U.S. government in the first quarter of 2006, which is included in current receivables. 74


  • Page 40

    NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 13: EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLANS Management reviews the assumptions used to measure pension costs on an annual basis. Economic and market conditions at the Pension Plans measurement date impact these assumptions from year to year We sponsor defined benefit pension plans covering a majority of and it is reasonably possible that material changes in pension our employees. The largest plan covers certain U.S. employees cost may be experienced in the future. age 21 and over, with at least one year of service. Eligible employ- ees as of May 31, 2003 were given the opportunity to make a Actuarial gains or losses are generated to the extent that actual one-time election to accrue future pension benefits under either results differ from those assumed. These actuarial gains and a new cash balance formula which we call the Portable Pension losses are amortized over the remaining average service lives Account or a traditional pension benefit formula. Benefits provided of our active employees if they exceed a corridor amount in under the traditional formula are based on average earnings and the aggregate. years of service. Under the Portable Pension Account, the retire- Establishing the expected future rate of investment return on our ment benefit is expressed as a dollar amount in a notional pension assets is a judgmental matter. Management considers account that grows with annual credits based on pay, age, and the following factors in determining this assumption: years of credited service, and interest on the notional account balance. In either case, employees retained all benefits previ- • the duration of our pension plan liabilities, which drives the ously accrued under the traditional pension benefit formula and investment strategy we can employ with our pension plan continue to receive the benefit of future salary increases on ben- assets. efits accrued as of May 31, 2003. Eligible employees hired after • the types of investment classes in which we invest our pension May 31, 2003 receive benefits exclusively under the Portable plan assets and the expected compound return we can reason- Pension Account. ably expect those investment classes to earn over the next Plan funding is actuarially determined and is subject to certain 10- to 15-year time period (or such other time period that may tax law limitations. International defined benefit pension plans be appropriate). provide benefits primarily based on final earnings and years of • the investment returns we can reasonably expect our active service and are funded in accordance with local laws and investment management program to achieve in excess of the income tax regulations. Substantially all plan assets are actively returns we could expect if investments were made strictly in managed. The weighted-average asset allocation for our primary indexed funds. pension plan at February 28, 2005 was as follows: Actual Target We review the expected long-term rate of return on an annual Domestic equities 53% 53% basis and revise it as appropriate. Also, we periodically commis- International equities 20 17 sion detailed asset/liability studies performed by third-party Private equities 2 5 professional investment advisors and actuaries. These studies Total equities 75 75 project our estimated future pension payments and evaluate the Long duration fixed income securities 15 15 efficiency of the allocation of our pension plan assets into various Other fixed income securities 10 10 investment categories. These studies also generate probability- 100% 100% adjusted expected future returns on those assets. The study performed for 2004 supported the reasonableness of our 9.10% The investment strategy for pension plan assets is to utilize a return assumption used for 2004 based on our liability duration diversified mix of global public and private equity portfolios, and market conditions at the time we set this assumption (in together with public and private fixed income portfolios, to earn 2004). The results of this study were reaffirmed for 2005 by our a long-term investment return that meets our pension plan third-party professional investment advisors and actuaries. obligations. Active management strategies are utilized within Postretirement Healthcare Plans the plan in an effort to realize investment returns in excess of Certain of our subsidiaries offer medical, dental and vision cov- market indices. erage to eligible U.S. retirees and their eligible dependents. U.S. Our pension cost is materially affected by the discount rate used employees covered by the principal plan become eligible for to measure pension obligations, the level of plan assets available these benefits at age 55 and older, if they have permanent, con- to fund those obligations and the expected long-term rate of tinuous service of at least 10 years after attainment of age 45 if return on plan assets. A substantial increase in the value of plan hired prior to January 1, 1988, or at least 20 years after attainment assets as a result of investment gains and contributions at the of age 35 if hired on or after January 1, 1988. measurement date for 2005 pension expense (February 27, 2004) almost completely offset the effect of a slightly lower discount rate and other actuarial losses. 75


  • Page 41

    FEDEX CORPORATION The following table provides a reconciliation of the changes in the pension and postretirement healthcare plans’ benefit obligations and fair value of assets over the two-year period ended May 31, 2005 and a statement of the funded status as of May 31, 2005 and 2004 (in millions): Postretirement Pension Plans Healthcare Plans 2005 2004 2005 2004 Accumulated Benefit Obligation (“ABO”) $ 8,933 $ 7,427 Changes in Projected Benefit Obligation (“PBO”) Projected benefit obligation at the beginning of year $ 8,683 $ 7,117 $ 496 $ 382 Service cost 417 376 37 35 Interest cost 579 490 32 25 Actuarial loss 907 661 – 36 Benefits paid (194) (136) (36) (23) Special termination benefits (1) – 158 – 38 Amendments, benefit enhancements and other 9 17 8 3 Projected benefit obligation at the end of year $ 10,401 $ 8,683 $ 537 $ 496 Change in Plan Assets Fair value of plan assets at beginning of year $ 7,783 $ 5,825 $ – $ – Actual return on plan assets 746 1,751 – – Company contributions 489 335 28 16 Benefits paid (194) (136) (36) (23) Other 2 8 8 7 Fair value of plan assets at end of year $ 8,826 $ 7,783 $ – $ – Funded Status of the Plans $ (1,575) $ (900) $(537) $ (496) Unrecognized actuarial loss (gain) 2,500 1,694 (1) (1) Unamortized prior service cost 104 118 4 1 Unrecognized transition amount (4) (5) – – Prepaid (accrued) benefit cost $ 1,025 $ 907 $(534) $ (496) Amount Recognized in the Balance Sheet at May 31: Prepaid benefit cost $ 1,272 $ 1,127 $ – $ – Accrued benefit liability (247) (220) (534) (496) Minimum pension liability (63) (67) – – Accumulated other comprehensive income (2) 52 54 – – Intangible asset 11 13 – – Prepaid (accrued) benefit cost $ 1,025 $ 907 $(534) $ (496) (1) The special termination benefits reflected in the table above related primarily to early retirement incentives offered to certain groups of our employees at FedEx Express during 2004 (see Note 5 for more information). (2) The minimum pension liability component of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income is shown in the Statement of Changes in Stockholders’ Investment and Comprehensive Income, net of deferred taxes. 76


  • Page 42

    NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Our pension plans included the following components at May 31, 2005 and 2004 (in millions): U.S. Plans Qualified Nonqualified International Plans Total 2005 2004 2005 2004 2005 2004 2005 2004 ABO $ 8,534 $ 7,069 $ 166 $ 166 $ 233 $ 192 $ 8,933 $ 7,427 PBO $ 9,937 $ 8,274 $ 181 $ 179 $ 283 $ 230 $10,401 $ 8,683 Fair Value of Plan Assets 8,699 7,678 – – 127 105 8,826 7,783 Funded Status $(1,238) $ (596) $ (181) $ (179) $ (156) $ (125) $ (1,575) $ (900) Unrecognized actuarial loss 2,414 1,621 27 32 59 41 2,500 1,694 Unamortized prior service cost 86 95 14 20 4 3 104 118 Unrecognized transition amount (5) (7) – – 1 2 (4) (5) Prepaid (accrued) benefit cost $ 1,257 $ 1,113 $ (140) $ (127) $ (92) $ (79) $ 1,025 $ 907 The projected benefit obligation (“PBO”) is the actuarial present legally required. However, we currently expect to make tax- value of benefits attributable to employee service rendered to deductible voluntary contributions to our qualified plans in 2006 date, including the effects of estimated future pay increases. The at levels comparable to 2005. accumulated benefit obligation (“ABO”) also reflects the actuar- We have certain nonqualified defined benefit pension plans that ial present value of benefits attributable to employee service are not funded because such funding would be deemed current rendered to date, but does not include the effects of estimated compensation to plan participants. Primarily related to those future pay increases. Therefore, the ABO as compared to plan plans and certain international plans, we have ABOs aggregat- assets is an indication of the assets currently available to fund ing approximately $399 million at May 31, 2005 and $358 million at vested and nonvested benefits accrued through May 31. May 31, 2004, with assets of $127 million at May 31, 2005 and $105 The measure of whether a pension plan is underfunded for finan- million at May 31, 2004. Plans with this funded status resulted in cial accounting purposes is based on a comparison of the ABO to the recognition of a minimum pension liability in our balance the fair value of plan assets and amounts accrued for such bene- sheets. This minimum liability was $63 million at May 31, 2005 and fits in the balance sheet. Although not legally required, we made $67 million at May 31, 2004. $460 million in contributions to our qualified U.S. pension plans in Net periodic benefit cost for the three years ended May 31 was 2005 compared to total contributions of $320 million in 2004. as follows (in millions): Currently, we do not expect any contributions for 2006 will be Pension Plans Postretirement Healthcare Plans 2005 2004 2003 2005 2004 2003 Service cost $ 417 $ 376 $ 374 $ 37 $ 35 $ 27 Interest cost 579 490 438 32 25 25 Expected return on plan assets (707) (597) (594) – – – Recognized actuarial losses 60 62 – – – – Other amortization 12 12 10 (1) – (2) $ 361 $ 343 $ 228 $ 68 $ 60 $ 50 Increases in pension costs from the prior year are primarily the result of changes in discount rate. Weighted-average actuarial assumptions for our primary U.S. plans, which comprise substantially all of our projected benefit obligations, are as follows: Pension Plans Postretirement Healthcare Plans 2005 2004 2003 2005 2004 2003 Discount rate 6.285% 6.78% 6.99% 6.16% 6.57% 6.75% Rate of increase in future compensation levels 3.15 3.15 3.15 – – – Expected long-term rate of return on assets 9.10 9.10 10.10 – – – 77


  • Page 43

    FEDEX CORPORATION The expected long-term rate of return assumptions for each NOTE 14: BUSINESS SEGMENT INFORMATION asset class are selected based on historical relationships Our operations for the periods presented are primarily repre- between the asset classes and the economic and capital mar- sented by FedEx Express, FedEx Ground, FedEx Freight and FedEx ket environments, updated for current conditions. Additional Kinko’s. These businesses form the core of our reportable seg- information about our pension plan can be found in the Critical ments. Other business units in the FedEx portfolio are FedEx Accounting Policies section of Management’s Discussion Trade Networks, FedEx SmartPost, FedEx Supply Chain Services, and Analysis. FedEx Custom Critical and Caribbean Transportation Services. Benefit payments, which reflect expected future service, are Management evaluates segment financial performance based on expected to be paid as follows for the years ending May 31 operating income. (in millions): Our reportable segments include the following businesses: 2006 $ 228 FedEx Express Segment FedEx Express 2007 263 FedEx Trade Networks 2008 283 2009 321 FedEx Ground Segment FedEx Ground 2010 375 FedEx SmartPost 2011-2015 2,718 FedEx Supply Chain Services FedEx Freight Segment FedEx Freight These estimates are based on assumptions about future events. FedEx Custom Critical Actual benefit payments may vary significantly from these Caribbean Transportation Services estimates. FedEx Kinko’s Segment FedEx Kinko’s Future medical benefit costs are estimated to increase at an annual rate of 13% during 2006, decreasing to an annual growth The FedEx Kinko’s segment was formed in the fourth quarter of rate of 5% in 2019 and thereafter. Future dental benefit costs are 2004 as a result of our acquisition of FedEx Kinko’s (formerly known estimated to increase at an annual rate of 6.75% during 2006, as Kinko’s, Inc.). As discussed in Note 3, we acquired FedEx Kinko’s decreasing to an annual growth rate of 5% in 2013 and thereafter. on February 12, 2004, and its results of operations have been Our postretirement healthcare cost is capped at 150% of the 1993 included in our financial results from the date of acquisition. per capita projected employer cost and, therefore, is not subject FedEx Services provides customer-facing sales, marketing and to medical and dental trends after the capped cost is attained. information technology support, primarily for FedEx Express and Therefore, a 1% change in these annual trend rates would not FedEx Ground. The costs for these activities are allocated based have a significant impact on the accumulated postretirement on metrics such as relative revenues or estimated services pro- benefit obligation at May 31, 2005, or 2005 benefit expense. vided. We believe these allocations approximate the cost of Defined Contribution Plans providing these functions. Other allocations include costs for Profit sharing and other defined contribution plans are in place services provided between operating companies and certain covering a majority of U.S. employees. The majority of U.S. other costs such as corporate management fees related to employees are covered under 401(k) plans to which we provide services received for general corporate oversight, including discretionary matching contributions based on employee contri- executive officers and certain legal and finance functions. butions. In addition, some employees are covered under profit Certain operating companies provide transportation and related sharing plans which provide for discretionary contributions, as services for other FedEx companies outside their reportable seg- determined annually by those business units. Expense under ment. Billings for such services are based on negotiated rates these plans was $97 million in 2005, $89 million in 2004 and $82 which we believe approximate fair value and are reflected as million in 2003. revenues of the billing segment. Such intersegment revenues and expenses are not separately identified in the following segment information as the amounts are not material and are eliminated in the consolidated results. 78


  • Page 44

    NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS The following table provides a reconciliation of reportable segment revenues, depreciation and amortization, operating income (loss) and segment assets to consolidated financial statement totals for the years ended or as of May 31 (in millions): FedEx FedEx FedEx FedEx Express Ground Freight Kinko’s Other and Consolidated Segment Segment Segment Segment (1) Eliminations (2) Total Revenues 2005 $19,485 $ 4,680 $ 3,217 $ 2,066 $ (85) $ 29,363 2004 17,497 3,910 2,689 521 93 24,710 2003 16,467 3,581 2,443 – (4) 22,487 Depreciation and amortization 2005 $ 798 $ 176 $ 102 $ 138 $ 248 $ 1,462 2004 810 154 92 33 286 1,375 2003 818 155 88 – 290 1,351 Operating income 2005 (3) $ 1,414 $ 604 $ 354 $ 100 $ (1) $ 2,471 2004 (4) 629 522 244 39 6 1,440 2003 783 494 193 – 1 1,471 Segment assets (5) 2005 $13,130 $ 2,776 $ 2,047 $ 2,987 $ (536) $ 20,404 2004 12,443 2,248 1,924 2,903 (384) 19,134 2003 11,188 1,846 1,825 – 526 15,385 (1) Includes the operations of FedEx Kinko’s from the formation of the FedEx Kinko’s segment on March 1, 2004. (2) Includes the results of operations of FedEx Kinko’s from February 12, 2004 (date of acquisition) through February 29, 2004 (approximately $100 million of revenue and $6 million of oper- ating income). (3) Includes $48 million related to an Airline Stabilization Act charge. (4) Includes business realignment costs of $428 million in the FedEx Express segment, $1 million in the FedEx Ground segment and $6 million in Other and Eliminations. (5) Segment assets include intercompany receivables. The following table provides a reconciliation of reportable segment capital expenditures to consolidated totals for the years ended May 31 (in millions): FedEx FedEx FedEx FedEx Express Ground Freight Kinko’s Consolidated Segment Segment Segment Segment Other Total 2005 $ 1,195 $ 456 $ 217 $152 $ 216 $ 2,236 2004 592 314 130 36 199 1,271 2003 917 252 139 – 203 1,511 79


  • Page 45

    FEDEX CORPORATION The following table presents revenue by service type and geo- NOTE 15: SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION graphic information for the years ended or as of May 31 (in Cash paid for interest expense and income taxes for the years millions): ended May 31 was as follows (in millions): Revenue By Service Type 2005 2004 2003 2005 2004 2003 FedEx Express segment: Interest (net of capitalized interest) $162 $151 $125 Package: Income taxes 824 364 53 U.S. overnight box $ 5,969 $ 5,558 $ 5,432 U.S. overnight envelope 1,798 1,700 1,715 FedEx Express amended two leases in 2004 and four leases in U.S. deferred 2,799 2,592 2,510 2003 for MD11 aircraft, which required FedEx Express to record Total domestic package $110 million in 2004 and $221 million in 2003, in both fixed assets revenue 10,566 9,850 9,657 and long-term liabilities. International priority 6,134 5,131 4,367 FedEx Express consolidated an entity that owns two MD11 air- Total package revenue 16,700 14,981 14,024 craft under the provisions of FIN46. The consolidation of this Freight: entity in September 2003 resulted in an increase in our fixed U.S. 1,854 1,609 1,564 assets and long-term liabilities of approximately $140 million. International 381 393 400 See Note 17. Total freight revenue 2,235 2,002 1,964 Other 550 514 479 NOTE 16: GUARANTEES AND INDEMNIFICATIONS Total FedEx Express segment 19,485 17,497 16,467 FedEx Ground segment 4,680 3,910 3,581 We adopted FIN 45, “Guarantor’s Accounting and Disclosure FedEx Freight segment 3,217 2,689 2,443 Requirements for Guarantees, Including Indirect Guarantees of FedEx Kinko’s segment(1) 2,066 521 – Indebtedness of Others,” during 2003, which required the pro- Other and Eliminations(2) (85) 93 (4) spective recognition and measurement of certain guarantees and $ 29,363 $24,710 $22,487 indemnifications. Accordingly, any contractual guarantees or indemnifications we have issued or modified subsequent to Geographical Information(3) December 31, 2002 are subject to evaluation. If required, a liability Revenues: for the fair value of the obligation undertaken will be recognized. U.S. $ 22,146 $18,643 $17,277 With the exception of residual value guarantees in certain oper- International 7,217 6,067 5,210 ating leases, a maximum obligation is generally not specified in $ 29,363 $24,710 $22,487 our guarantees and indemnifications. As a result, the overall Noncurrent assets: maximum potential amount of the obligation under such guaran- U.S. $ 13,020 $12,644 $ 9,908 tees and indemnifications cannot be reasonably estimated. International 2,115 1,520 1,536 Historically, we have not been required to make significant pay- $ 15,135 $14,164 $11,444 ments under our guarantee or indemnification obligations and (1) Includes the operations of FedEx Kinko’s from the formation of the FedEx Kinko’s seg- no amounts have been recognized in our financial statements for ment on March 1, 2004. the underlying fair value of these obligations. (2) Includes the results of operations of FedEx Kinko’s from February 12, 2004 (date of acquisition) through February 29, 2004 (approximately $100 million of revenue). We have guarantees under certain operating leases, amounting (3) International revenue includes shipments that either originate in or are destined to locations outside the United States. Noncurrent assets include property and equipment, to $37 million as of May 31, 2005, for the residual values of vehi- goodwill and other long-term assets. Flight equipment is allocated between geographic cles and facilities at the end of the respective operating lease areas based on usage. periods. Under these leases, if the fair market value of the leased asset at the end of the lease term is less than an agreed-upon value as set forth in the related operating lease agreement, we will be responsible to the lessor for the amount of such deficiency. Based upon our expectation that none of these leased assets will have a residual value at the end of the lease term that is materi- ally less than the value specified in the related operating lease agreement, we do not believe it is probable that we will be required to fund any amounts under the terms of these guarantee arrangements. Accordingly, no accruals have been recognized for these guarantees. 80


  • Page 46

    NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Certain of our operating leases contain other indemnification obli- As a result of this consolidation, the accompanying May 31, 2005 gations to the lessor, which are considered ordinary and balance sheet includes an additional $120 million of fixed assets customary (e.g., use and environmental indemnifications). The and $125 million of long-term liabilities. The May 31, 2004 balance terms of these obligations range in duration and often are not lim- sheet includes an additional $126 million of fixed assets and $133 ited. Such indemnification obligations continue until and, in many million of long-term liabilities. cases, after expiration of the respective lease. NOTE 18: COMMITMENTS In conjunction with certain transactions, primarily sales or pur- chases of operating assets or services in the ordinary course of Annual purchase commitments under various contracts as of business, we sometimes provide routine indemnifications (e.g., May 31, 2005 were as follows (in millions): environmental, tax and software infringement), the terms of Aircraft- which range in duration and often are not limited. Aircraft Related(1) Other(2) Total 2006 $ 111 $ 237 $ 582 $ 930 FedEx’s publicly held debt (approximately $1.7 billion) is guaran- 2007 115 91 106 312 teed by our subsidiaries. The guarantees are full and 2008 131 74 48 253 unconditional, joint and several and any subsidiaries that are not 2009 567 61 37 665 guarantors are minor as defined by Securities and Exchange 2010 517 56 22 595 Commission regulations. FedEx, as the parent company issuer of Thereafter 625 70 166 861 this debt, has no independent assets or operations. There are no significant restrictions on our ability or the ability of any guaran- (1) Primarily aircraft modifications. (2) Primarily vehicles, facilities, computers, printing and other equipment and advertising tor to obtain funds from its subsidiaries by such means as a and promotions contracts. dividend or loan. Special facility revenue bonds have been issued by certain The amounts reflected in the table above for purchase commit- municipalities primarily to finance the acquisition and construc- ments represent noncancelable agreements to purchase goods tion of various airport facilities and equipment. In certain cases, or services. Commitments to purchase aircraft in passenger con- the bond proceeds were loaned to FedEx Express and are includ- figuration do not include the attendant costs to modify these ed in long-term debt and, in other cases, the facilities were aircraft for cargo transport. Open purchase orders that are can- leased to us and are accounted for as either capital leases or celable are not considered unconditional purchase obligations operating leases. Approximately $760 million in principal of these for financial reporting purposes. bonds (with total future principal and interest payments of As of May 31, 2005, FedEx Express is committed to purchase four approximately $1.3 billion as of May 31, 2005) is unconditionally Airbus A300s, two Airbus A310s, nine ATR-72s, one MD11 and 10 guaranteed by FedEx Express. Of the $760 million bond principal, Airbus A380s (a new high-capacity, long-range aircraft). FedEx $204 million was in capital lease obligations at May 31, 2005 and Express expects to take delivery of the MD11, four A300s, all of the remainder was in operating leases. the ATR-72s and one Airbus A310 in 2006. The remaining Airbus A310 is expected to be delivered in 2007. FedEx Express expects NOTE 17: VARIABLE INTEREST ENTITIES to take delivery of three of the 10 A380 aircraft in each of 2009, FedEx Express entered into a lease in July 2001 for two MD11 air- 2010 and 2011 and the remaining one in 2012. Deposits and craft. These assets are held by a separate entity, which was progress payments of $29 million have been made toward these established and is owned by independent third parties who pro- purchases and other planned aircraft-related transactions. In vide financing through debt and equity participation. The original addition, we have committed to modify our DC10 aircraft for pas- cost of the assets under the lease was approximately $150 million. senger-to-freighter and two-man cockpit configurations. Payments related to these activities are included in the table This lease contains residual value guarantees that obligate FedEx above. Aircraft and aircraft-related contracts are subject to Express, not the third-party owners, to absorb the majority of the price escalations. losses, if any, of the entity. The lease also provides FedEx Express with the right to receive any residual returns of the entity if they occur. At May 31, 2005, the residual value guarantee associated with this lease, which represents the maximum exposure to loss, was $89 million. FIN 46 required us to consolidate the separate entity that owns the two MD11 aircraft. Since the entity was cre- ated before February 1, 2003, we measured the assets and liabilities at their carrying amounts (the amounts at which they would have been recorded in the consolidated financial state- ments if FIN 46 had been effective at the inception of the lease). 81


  • Page 47

    FEDEX CORPORATION NOTE 19: CONTINGENCIES NOTE 20: RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS Wage-and-Hour. We are a defendant in a number of lawsuits In November 1999, FedEx entered into a multi-year naming rights filed in federal or California state courts containing various class- agreement with the National Football League Washington action allegations under federal or California wage-and-hour Redskins professional football team. Under this agreement, FedEx laws. The plaintiffs in these lawsuits are employees of FedEx has certain marketing rights, including the right to name the operating companies who allege, among other things, that they Redskins’ stadium “FedExField.” In August 2003, Frederick W. were forced to work “off the clock” and were not provided work Smith, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of FedEx, breaks or other benefits. The plaintiffs generally seek unspeci- personally acquired an approximate 10% ownership interest in fied monetary damages, injunctive relief, or both. the Washington Redskins and joined its board of directors. To date, one of these wage-and-hour cases, Foster v. FedEx A member of our Board of Directors, J.R. Hyde, III, and his wife Express, has been certified as a class action. The plaintiffs rep- together own approximately 13% of HOOPS, L.P. (“HOOPS”), the resent a class of hourly FedEx Express employees in California owner of the NBA Memphis Grizzlies professional basketball from October 14, 1998 to present. The plaintiffs allege that hourly team. Mr. Hyde, through one of his companies, also is the general employees are routinely required to work “off the clock” and are partner of the minority limited partner of HOOPS. During 2002, not paid for this additional work. The court issued a ruling on FedEx entered into a multi-year, $90 million naming rights agree- December 13, 2004 granting class certification on all issues. ment with HOOPS that will be amortized to expense over the life The ruling, however, does not address whether we will ultimately of the agreement. Under this agreement, FedEx has certain mar- be held liable. keting rights, including the naming of the new arena where the Grizzlies play as FedExForum. Pursuant to a separate agreement We have denied any liability with respect to these claims and with HOOPS, the City of Memphis and Shelby County, FedEx has intend to vigorously defend ourself in these cases. However, it is agreed to pay $2.5 million a year for the balance of the reasonably possible that material losses could be incurred on 25-year term of the agreement if HOOPS terminates its lease for one or more of these matters as these cases develop. the new arena after 17 years. FedEx also purchased $2 million of Independent Contractor. FedEx Ground is involved in numerous municipal bonds issued by the Memphis and Shelby County purported class-action lawsuits and other proceedings in which Sports Authority, the proceeds of which are to be used to finance the threshold issue is whether some or all of FedEx Ground’s a portion of the construction costs of the new arena. owner-operators are in fact employees, rather than independent On March 26, 2004, FedEx purchased an aggregate of 94 acres of contractors. Adverse determinations in these matters could, real estate in Olive Branch, Mississippi for $4.7 million. FedEx is among other things, entitle certain of our contractors to the constructing a FedEx Ground hub on this site, which is just south of reimbursement of certain expenses and to the benefit of Memphis. The 94-acre site is divided into three parcels, two of wage-and-hour laws and result in employment and withholding which were owned by entities in which Mr. Hyde has a 50% own- tax liability for FedEx Ground. We have filed a motion with the ership interest. These two parcels total approximately 3.4 acres. Judicial Panel on Multi-District Litigation to transfer and consol- An independent appraisal of the property determined its fair idate all the class-action lawsuits for administration by a single market value to be not less than the negotiated purchase price. federal court. All but one of these lawsuits has been stayed pend- ing a ruling on our motion. We strongly believe that FedEx Ground’s owner-operators are properly classified as independent contractors and that we will prevail in these proceedings. Given the nature and preliminary status of the claims, we cannot yet determine the amount or a reasonable range of potential loss in these matters, if any. Other. FedEx and its subsidiaries are subject to other legal pro- ceedings that arise in the ordinary course of their business. In the opinion of management, the aggregate liability, if any, with respect to these other actions will not materially adversely affect our financial position, results of operations or cash flows. 82


  • Page 48

    NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS NOTE 21: SUMMARY OF QUARTERLY OPERATING RESULTS (UNAUDITED) First Second Third Fourth (In millions, except per share amounts) Quarter Quarter Quarter Quarter 2005 Revenues $ 6,975 $ 7,334 $ 7,339 $ 7,715 Operating income 579 600 (1) 552 740 Net income 330 354 (1)(2) 317 448 Basic earnings per common share(7) 1.10 1.18 1.05 1.48 Diluted earnings per common share 1.08 1.15 (1)(2) 1.03 1.46 2004(3) Revenues $ 5,687 $ 5,920 $ 6,062 $ 7,041 Operating income 200 (4) 183 (6) 372 685 Net income 128(4)(5) 91(6) 207 412 (7) Basic earnings per common share(7) 0.43 (4)(5) 0.31(6) 0.69 1.38 (7) Diluted earnings per common share 0.42 (4)(5) 0.30 (6) 0.68 1.36 (7) (1) Includes $48 million ($31 million, net of tax, $0.10 per basic and diluted share) related to an Airline Stabilization Act charge described in Note 1. (2) Includes an $11 million ($0.04 per basic and diluted share) benefit from an income tax adjustment described in Note 12. (3) Includes FedEx Kinko’s from February 12, 2004 (date of acquisition). See Note 3. (4) Includes $132 million ($82 million, net of tax, $0.28 per share, or $0.27 per diluted share) of business realignment costs described in Note 5. (5) Includes $26 million, net of tax ($0.09 per share or $0.08 per diluted share) related to a favorable ruling on an IRS case described in Note 12. (6) Includes $283 million ($175 million, net of tax, $0.59 per share, or $0.57 per diluted share) of business realignment costs described in Note 5. (7) The sum of the quarterly earnings per share may not equal annual amounts due to differences in the weighted-average number of shares outstanding during the respective periods. 83


  • Page 49

    FEDEX CORPORATION REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM The Board of Directors and Stockholders FedEx Corporation We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of FedEx Corporation as of May 31, 2005 and 2004, and the related consolidated statements of income, changes in stockholders’ investment and comprehensive income, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended May 31, 2005. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the finan- cial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion. In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of FedEx Corporation at May 31, 2005 and 2004, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended May 31, 2005, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the effec- tiveness of FedEx Corporation’s internal control over financial reporting as of May 31, 2005, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated July 12, 2005 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon. Memphis, Tennessee July 12, 2005 84


  • Page 50

    NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA The following table sets forth certain selected consolidated financial and operating data for FedEx as of and for the five years ended May 31, 2005. This information should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations and Financial Condition and other financial data appearing elsewhere in this Report. (In millions, except per share amounts and other operating data) 2005(1)(2) 2004(3)(4)(5) 2003 2002 2001(6) (7) Operating Results Revenues $ 29,363 $ 24,710 $ 22,487 $ 20,607 $ 19,629 Operating income 2,471 1,440 1,471 1,321 1,071 Income before income taxes 2,313 1,319 1,338 1,160 927 Income before cumulative effect of change in accounting principle 1,449 838 830 725 584 Cumulative effect of change in accounting for goodwill(8) – – – (15) – Net income $ 1,449 $ 838 $ 830 $ 710 $ 584 Per Share Data Earnings per share: Basic: Income before cumulative effect of change in accounting principle $ 4.81 $ 2.80 $ 2.79 $ 2.43 $ 2.02 Cumulative effect of change in accounting for goodwill(8) – – – (0.05) – $ 4.81 $ 2.80 $ 2.79 $ 2.38 $ 2.02 Assuming dilution: Income before cumulative effect of change in accounting principle $ 4.72 $ 2.76 $ 2.74 $ 2.39 $ 1.99 Cumulative effect of change in accounting for goodwill(8) – – – (0.05) – $ 4.72 $ 2.76 $ 2.74 $ 2.34 $ 1.99 Average shares of common stock outstanding 301 299 298 298 289 Average common and common equivalent shares outstanding 307 304 303 303 293 Cash dividends declared $ 0.29 $ 0.29 $ 0.15 $ 0.05 – Financial Position Property and equipment, net $ 9,643 $ 9,037 $ 8,700 $ 8,302 $ 8,100 Total assets 20,404 19,134 15,385 13,812 13,392 Long-term debt, less current portion 2,427 2,837 1,709 1,800 1,900 Common stockholders’ investment 9,588 8,036 7,288 6,545 5,900 Other Operating Data FedEx Express aircraft fleet 670 645 643 647 640 Average full-time equivalent employees and contractors 215,838 195,838 190,918 184,953 176,960 (1) Results for 2005 include $48 million ($31 million, net of tax, $0.10 per diluted share) related to an Airline Stabilization Act charge. See Note 1 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements. (2) Results for 2005 include a $12 million or $0.04 per diluted share benefit from an income tax adjustment. See Note 12 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements. (3) Results for 2004 include $435 million ($270 million, net of tax, or $0.89 per diluted share) of business realignment costs. See Note 5 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements. (4) Results for 2004 include the financial results of FedEx Kinko’s from February 12, 2004 (the date of acquisition). See Note 3 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements. (5) Results for 2004 include $37 million, net of tax, or $0.12 per diluted share benefit related to a favorable ruling on an aircraft engine maintenance tax case and the reduction of our effective tax rate. See Note 12 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements. (6) Results for 2001 include the financial results of FedEx Freight East from January 1, 2001 (the date of acquisition for financial reporting purposes). (7) Results for 2001 include asset impairment charges of $102 million ($65 million, net of tax, or $0.22 per diluted share) at FedEx Express and reorganization costs of $22 million ($14 million, net of tax, or $0.05 per diluted share) at FedEx Supply Chain Services. (8) Results for 2002 reflect our adoption of SFAS 142, “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets.” We recognized an adjustment of $25 million ($15 million, net of tax, or $0.05 per share) to reduce the carrying value of certain goodwill to its implied fair value. 85

  • View More

Get the full picture and Receive alerts on lawsuits, news articles, publications and more!