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    OCI RESOURCES 2013 ANNUAL REPORT


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    2013 REVENUE BY SEGMENT (in millions) Total Domestic: $195.1 Revenue $442.1 International: $247.0 ADJUSTED EBITDA & MARGIN ($ in millions) 30.7% 29.9% 23.6% SODA ASH VOLUME SOLD (millions of ST) $142 $126 2.5 2.5 2.3 $104 2011 2012 2013 2011 2012 2013 EBITDA EBITDA Margin FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS SHARE PRICE (SEPT. 2013–FEB. 2014) 25 20 15 9/13/2013 10/13/2013 11/13/2013 12/13/2013 1/13/2014 2/13/2014


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    Dear Unitholders: It is my privilege to present to you the first annual report of OCI Resources LP (NYSE: OCIR). After a successful initial public offering, our common units began trading on the New York Stock Exchange September 13, 2013. Our history, however, goes back more than 50 years to our mining and refining operation, located on the world’s largest trona ore reserve in Green River, Wyoming. Our innovative facility layout coupled with the shallow depth of our mine gives us operational advantages that are manifested in high productivity and efficiency rates. Refining soda ash from trona ore enables us to produce at a substantially lower delivered cost than other producers in the world. In a business where demand growth will continue to be driven by international consumption, this cost differential is a sustainable competitive advantage. More than just competitively positioned and operationally sound, we enjoy a long-established culture of safety that includes earning the Wyoming State Mine Inspector’s Top Safety Excellence Award every year from 2008 through 2012, and countless awards throughout the years for both our mine and surface rescue teams. Our employees take great pride in looking out for one another, ensuring each and every employee goes home at the end of their shift exactly as they arrived. Our commitment to our World Class safety culture is second to none. 2013 Financial Highlights: On a full-year basis, our volumes were up 1.5%, but revenues decreased 4.4% due to lower international pricing. We experienced international volume growth in a year where operating rates in China declined due to slower than expected growth in its economy. We ended our first year as a public company with pro-forma earnings per unit of $1.94. The fourth quarter was our best quarter of 2013, as we generated earnings per unit of $0.62. In January, we declared our first ever quarterly distribution of $0.50 per unit plus $0.0707 for the post-IPO period in September. Looking Forward: As we look ahead to 2014, soda ash market conditions continue to improve. Early results indicate further upward price improvement in Asia although we remain somewhat cautious on predicting how much further pricing will move given expected capacity increases coming on line in China. Nevertheless, we still expect international prices to increase in the 3-5% range year-on-year. The future for OCIR looks incredibly bright. We are well positioned to take advantage of the continued growth of worldwide soda ash demand, make strategic reinvestments in existing infrastructure to maximize our production volumes and evaluate other strategic investment opportunities. On behalf of our employees, management and Board of Directors, we look forward to your involvement in the growth and development of OCIR and sharing the success of the business with you. Kirk Milling President and Chief Executive Officer OCI Resources


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    Table of Contents UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Washington, D.C. 20549 FORM 10-K (Mark One) ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2013 OR TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the transition period from _______ to ________ Commission file number: 001-36062 OCI RESOURCES LP (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter) DELAWARE 46-2613366 (State or other jurisdiction of (I.R.S. Employer Incorporation or Organization) Identification No.) Five Concourse Parkway Suite 2500 Atlanta, Georgia 30328 (Address of Principal Executive Offices) (Zip Code) Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (770) 375-2300 Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: Title of each class Name of each exchange on which registered Common units representing limited partnership interests New York Stock Exchange Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes No Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes No Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (Section 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes No Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (Section 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definition of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company (Do not check if a smaller reporting company) Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Exchange Act Rule 12b-2). Yes No As of June 30, 2013, the last business day of the registrant's equity was not listed on a domestic exchange or on an over-the-counter market. The registrant's common units began trading on the New York Stock Exchange on September 13, 2013.


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    Table of Contents The registrant had 9,775,500 common units, 9,775,500 subordinated units and 399,000 general partner units outstanding at March 10, 2014, the most recent practicable date. Documents Incorporated by Reference: None 2


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    Table of Contents OCI RESOURCES LP ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K TABLE OF CONTENTS Unless the context otherwise requires, references in this Annual Report on Form 10-K to the "Predecessor," "we," "our," "us," or like terms, when used in a historical context (periods prior to September 18, 2013, the closing date of our IPO), refer to OCI Wyoming Holding Co. ("OCI Holdings") and its subsidiary, our predecessor for accounting purposes. References in this Report to "OCIR," "the Partnership," "we," "our," "us," or like terms, when used in the present tense or prospectively (starting September 18, 2013), refer to OCI Resources LP and its subsidiary. References to “our general partner” or “OCI GP” refer to OCI Resource Partners LLC, the general partner of OCI Resources LP and a wholly-owned subsidiary of OCI Holdings. References to "our sponsor" or "Enterprises" refer to OCI Enterprises Inc., which owns 100% of the capital stock of OCI Chemical Corporation ("OCI Chemical"), which in turn owns 100% of the capital stock of OCI Holdings. We include cross references to captions elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, which we refer to as this "Report", where you can find related additional information. The following table of contents tells you where to find these captions. Page Number Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements 4 Explanatory Note 6 PART I Item 1. Business 8 Item 1A. Risk Factors 20 Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 45 Item 2. Properties 45 Item 3. Legal Proceedings 46 Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 46 PART II Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Item 5. Securities 46 Item 6. Selected Financial Data 51 Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 53 Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 69 Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 72 Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosures 94 Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 94 Item 9B. Other Information 94 PART III Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 95 Item 11. Executive Compensation 99 Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 100 Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 102 Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services 106 PART IV Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 111 Signatures 109 3


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    Table of Contents CAUTIONARY STATEMENT CONCERNING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS This Report contains, and our other public filings and oral and written statements by us and our management may include, statements that constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the United States securities laws. We have based such forward-looking statements on management's beliefs and assumptions and on information currently available to us. Forward-looking statements include the information concerning our possible or assumed future results of operations, business strategies, financing plans, competitive position, potential growth opportunities, potential operating performance, the effects of competition and the effects of future legislation or regulations. Forward-looking statements include all statements that are not historical facts and may be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as the words "believe," "expect," "plan," "intend," "anticipate," "estimate," "predict," "forecast," "potential," "continue," "may," "will," "should" or the negative of these terms or similar expressions. In particular, forward-looking statements in this Report include statements concerning future distributions, if any, and such distributions are subject to the approval of the board of directors of our general partner and will be based upon circumstances then existing. When considering these forward-looking statements, you should keep in mind the risk factors and other cautionary statements set forth in this Report. Actual results may vary materially. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements. You should also understand that it is not possible to predict or identify all such factors and should not consider the following list to be a complete statement of all potential risks and uncertainties. Factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from the results contemplated by such forward-looking statements and, therefore, affect our ability to distribute cash to unitholders, include: changes in general economic conditions in the United States and globally; changes in our relationships with our customers or the loss of or adverse developments at major customers, including the American Natural Soda Ash Corporation, or ANSAC; the demand for soda ash and the development of glass and glass making products alternatives; changes in soda ash prices; changes in demand for glass in the construction, automotive and beverage industries; shifts in glass production from the United States to international locations; the ability of our competitors to develop more efficient mining and processing techniques; operating hazards and other risks incidental to the mining, processing and shipment of trona ore and soda ash; natural disasters, weather-related delays, casualty losses and other matters beyond our control; increases in electricity and natural gas prices paid by us; inability to renew our mineral leases and license or material changes in lease or license royalties; inability to renew our rail leases and contracts, disruption in railroad service or increases in rail, vessel and other transportation costs; deterioration in our labor relations; large customer defaults; the price and availability of debt and equity financing; changes in interest rates; changes in the availability and cost of capital; our lack of asset and geographic diversification, including reliance on a single facility for conducting our operations; our reliance on insurance policies that may not fully cover an accident or event that causes significant damage to our facility or causes extended business interruption; anticipated operating and recovery rates at our facility; shutdowns (either temporary or permanent), including, without limitation, the timing and length of planned maintenance outages; increased competition and supply from international soda ash producers, especially in China and Turkey; potential increases in costs and distraction resulting from the requirements of being a publicly traded partnership; exemptions we rely on in connection with NYSE corporate governance requirements; risks relating to our relationships with Enterprises or its affiliates; control of our general partner by Enterprises; the conflicts of interest faced by our senior management team, which operates both us and our general partner and are employed by Enterprises or its other affiliates; 4


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    Table of Contents limitations on the fiduciary duties owed by our general partner to us and our limited partners which are included in the partnership agreement; changes in our treatment as a partnership for U.S. federal income or state tax purposes; changes in tax status; and the effects of existing and future laws and governmental regulations. Forward-looking statements involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. You should not put undue reliance on any forward- looking statements. After the date of this Report, we do not have any intention or obligation to update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information or future events except as required by applicable law. The risk factors discussed in Item 1A. "Risk Factors" and the factors discussed in Item 7. "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" could cause our results to differ materially from those expressed in forward-looking statements. There may also be other risks that we are unable to predict at this time. All forward-looking statements included in this Report are expressly qualified in their entirety by these cautionary statements. These factors should not be construed as exhaustive. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or review any forward- looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise. 5


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    Table of Contents Explanatory Note OCI Resources LP (the “Partnership,” "OCIR," "we," "us," or "our") initially filed a Registration Statement on Form S-1, as amended (File No. 333-189838) with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on July 8, 2013, which was amended on July 22, 2013, August 1, 2013, August 9, 2013, September 3, 2013 and September 10, 2013, and declared effective on September 12, 2013 (the “Registration Statement”). The Partnership was formed on April 22, 2013 by OCI Wyoming Holding Co. ("OCI Holdings"), a wholly-owned subsidiary of OCI Chemical Corporation ("OCI Chemical"), to operate the trona ore mining and soda ash production business of OCI Wyoming, L.P. ("OCI Wyoming"). Most, but not all of, the information contained in this Report relates to periods that ended prior to the completion of the IPO (defined below), and prior to the effective dates of the agreements discussed herein. Consequently, the consolidated financial statements and related discussion of financial condition and results of operations contained in this Report pertain to the portion of the business of OCI Holdings and its subsidiary which we refer to herein as the "Predecessor" to the Partnership for accounting purposes. On September 18, 2013 (the “Closing Date”), the Partnership completed its initial public offering ("IPO") of a total of 5,000,000 common units representing limited partner interests (“Common Units”) at a price of $19.00 per unit. The Partnership received net proceeds of approximately $83.3 million from the IPO, after deducting the underwriting discount, the structuring fee and offering expenses. The Partnership paid, on October 28, 2013, a portion of the net proceeds to OCI Wyoming Company ("Wyoming Co.") in exchange for the contribution of its 10.02% limited partner interest in OCI Wyoming to the Partnership and distributed the remaining net proceeds of the IPO to OCI Chemical, via OCI Holdings. Prior to the IPO, OCI Wyoming's general partner interests were owned 50.49% and 48.51% by the Predecessor and Natural Resource Partners L.P. ("NRP"), respectively, with the 1% limited partner interests in OCI Wyoming being held by Wyoming Co. The Predecessor and Wyoming Co. are commonly controlled by OCI Chemical. In connection with the IPO, the following transactions (the "Restructuring") were completed: The Predecessor contributed its 50.49% general partner interest in OCI Wyoming to the Partnership. Through a series of transactions between OCI Chemical, its commonly controlled subsidiaries and NRP, the 1% limited partner interest in OCI Wyoming owned by Wyoming Co. was restructured resulting in the Partnership's and NRP's general partner interest in OCI Wyoming being reduced to 40.98% and 39.37%, respectively, and Wyoming Co. and NRP owning a 10.02% and 9.63% limited partner interest in OCI Wyoming, respectively. Wyoming Co. contributed its 10.02% limited partner interest to the Partnership in exchange for approximately $65.3 million paid from the net proceeds of the IPO. At the consummation of the restructuring, the Partnership owned a 40.98% general partnership interest and a 10.02% limited partner interest in OCI Wyoming, and NRP owned a 39.37% general partner interest and a 9.63% limited partner interest in OCI Wyoming. The restructuring has been accounted for as a reorganization of entities under common control. As a result, the consolidated balance sheet of the Predecessor as of December 31, 2012 has been restated to reflect the combination of the ownership interests in OCI Wyoming previously held by the Predecessor and Wyoming Co. adjusted for certain push-down accounting effects of the restructuring as of January 1, 2012. The consolidated financial statements of the Predecessor for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, reflect the ownership interests in OCI Wyoming previously held by the Predecessor and Wyoming Co. on a combined basis and adjusted for certain push-down accounting effects of the restructuring for all periods presented. The consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2013 includes the combined results of the Predecessor through September 17, 2013 and the Partnership for the period from September 18, 2013 through December 31, 2013. While management believes that the financial statements contained herein are prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), and in compliance with the rules and regulations of the SEC, we do not believe that these financial statements are necessarily indicative of the financial results which will be reported by the Partnership for periods subsequent to the IPO and the other transactions consummated in connection therewith. Emerging Growth Company Status We qualify as an "emerging growth company" as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, or the JOBS Act. For as long as we are an emerging growth company, unlike other public companies, we will not be required to: provide an auditor's attestation report on management's assessment of the effectiveness of our system of internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002; 6


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    Table of Contents present more than two years of audited financial statements, selected financial data and related Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in this Report; comply with certain new requirements adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or the PCAOB; comply with certain new audit rules adopted by the PCAOB after April 5, 2012, unless the SEC determines otherwise; provide disclosures regarding executive compensation required of larger public companies; or obtain unitholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We will cease to be an emerging growth company when any of the following conditions apply: we have $1.0 billion or more in annual revenues; at least $700 million in market value of our common units are held by non-affiliates; we issue more than $1.0 billion of non-convertible debt over a three-year period; or the last day of the fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of our initial public offering has passed. In addition, an emerging growth company can delay its adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. However, we have made the irrevocable election to "opt out" of such extended transition period, and as a result, we will comply with any new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which non-emerging growth companies must adopt such standards. Glossary of Industry Terms Industry terms are defined in the Glossary of Industry Terms, included at the end of this Report. 7


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    Table of Contents PART I Item 1. Business Overview We are a Delaware limited partnership formed by OCI Holdings to operate the trona ore mining and soda ash production business of OCI Wyoming. We own a controlling 40.98% general partner interest and 10.02% limited partner interest in OCI Wyoming, which is one of the largest and lowest cost producers of soda ash in the world, serving a global market from our facility in the Green River Basin of Wyoming. Our facility has been in operation for more than 50 years. The following table sets forth certain operating data regarding our business: Year Ended December 31, 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Operating and Other Data: (thousands of short tons, except for ratio data) Trona ore mined 3,921.5 3,865.4 3,676.0 3,597.4 3,193.4 Ore to ash ratio(1) 1.62: 1.0 1.59: 1.0 1.63: 1.0 1.64: 1.0 1.78: 1.0 Soda ash volume sold 2,492.2 2,455.5 2,308.3 2,235.6 1,833.8 (1) Ore to ash ratio expresses the number of short tons of trona ore needed to produce one short ton of soda ash and includes our deca rehydration recovery process. Trona, a naturally occurring soft mineral, is also known as sodium sesquicarbonate and consists primarily of sodium carbonate, or soda ash, sodium bicarbonate and water. We process trona ore into soda ash, which is an essential raw material in flat glass, container glass, detergents, chemicals, paper and other consumer and industrial products. The vast majority of the world's trona reserves are located in the Green River Basin. According to historical production statistics, approximately one-quarter of global soda ash is produced by processing trona, with the remainder being produced synthetically through chemical processes. We believe processing soda ash from trona is the cheapest manner in which to produce soda ash. The costs associated with procuring the materials needed for synthetic production are greater than the costs associated with mining trona for trona-based production. In addition, we believe trona-based production consumes less energy and produces fewer undesirable by-products than synthetic production. Our principal executive offices are located at Five Concourse Parkway, Suite 2500, Atlanta, Georgia 30328, and our telephone number is (770) 375-2300. Our website address is www.ociresources.com. We make available through our website our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish such material to, the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC. Our website also includes our Code of Conduct and Ethics, our Corporate Governance Guidelines, our Internal Reporting and Whistleblower Protection Policy, our Insider Trading Policy and the charters of our Audit Committee and Conflicts Committee. The information on our website, or information about us on any other website, is not incorporated by reference into this Report. The SEC maintains an internet site at www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. Our Competitive Strengths We believe that the following competitive strengths enable us and will continue to allow us to execute our business strategies successfully and to achieve our objective of generating and growing cash available for distribution to our unitholders: Cost Advantages of Producing Soda Ash from Trona. We believe that as a producer of soda ash from trona, we have a significant competitive advantage compared to synthetic producers of soda ash. The manufacturing and processing costs for producing soda ash from trona are more cost competitive than other manufacturing techniques partly because the costs associated with procuring the materials needed for synthetic production are greater than the costs associated with mining trona for trona-based production. In addition, we believe trona-based production consumes less energy and produces fewer undesirable by-products than synthetic production. Based on our estimates and industry sources, we believe the average cost of production per short ton of soda ash (before freight and logistics costs) from trona is approximately one-third to one-half the cost per short ton of soda ash from synthetic production. In addition, synthetic producers of soda ash incur additional costs associated with storing or disposing of, or attempting to resell, the by-products the synthetic processes produce. Even after taking into account the higher freight and logistics costs associated with our soda ash exports, we believe we can be cost competitive with synthetic soda ash operations who are typically located closer to customers than we are. We believe that our competitive cost structure, together with our current logistics arrangements, allows us to be competitive globally. 8


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    Table of Contents Substantial Reserve Life from Significant Reserves. As of December 31, 2013, Hollberg Professional Group, an independent mining and geological consulting firm, estimated we had proven and probable reserves of approximately 263.1 million short tons of trona, which is equivalent to 143.3 million short tons of soda ash. Based on a projected mining rate of 4.0 million short tons of trona per year, we have enough proven and probable trona reserves to continue mining trona for approximately 66 years. Please see Item 1, Business, "Trona Reserves" for more information. Certain Operational Advantages Compared to Other U.S. Trona-Based Producers. We believe we have certain operational advantages over other soda ash producers in the Green River Basin due to the operational characteristics of our facilities as described below. These advantages are manifested in our high productivity and efficiency rates. Location of our mining beds and high purity trona. Our mining beds are located 800 to 1100 feet below the surface, which is significantly closer to the surface than the mining beds of other operators in the Green River Basin. The relatively shallow depth of our beds compared to other Green River Basin trona mines contributes to favorable ground conditions and improved mining efficiency. Our competitive advantage resides in the fact that we can mine and roof bolt continuously while mining. In addition, the trona in our mining beds has a higher concentration of soda ash as compared to the trona mined at other locations in the Green River Basin, which is typically imbedded or mixed with greater amounts of halite and other impurities. Our trona ore is generally composed of approximately 85% to 89% pure trona. Advantageous facility layout. Our surface site includes a high capacity network of natural ponds that we use to recapture soda ash lost in processing trona through a process we introduced in 2009 called deca rehydration. Primarily as a result of this process, we have been able to reduce our ore to ash ratio by 9% over the past four years. While other producers in the Green River Basin also utilize deca rehydration, our natural pond complex enables us to spread deca-saturated water over a large surface area, which facilitates evaporation and access to the resulting deca. Additionally, we can transfer water from one pond to another, a process we call "de-watering," leaving the first pond dry. De-watering enables us to use front loaders and other hauling equipment to move dry deca from that "de-watered" pond to our processing facility. Other producers in the area instead need to utilize costly dredging techniques to extract deca from their ponds, and the recovered deca is wet, and therefore requires more energy to process than dry deca. Introducing deca into our process has also reduced our energy consumption per short ton of soda ash produced. Partly due to these operational advantages over other domestic producers, we believe we have the most efficient soda ash production facility in the Green River Basin both in terms of short tons of soda ash produced per employee and in energy consumed per short ton of soda ash produced. In 2013, we used approximately 4.0 mmBTUs of energy per short ton of soda ash processed, as compared to an average of 5.4 mmBTUs of energy for the other three operators in the Green River Basin according to the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality and our internal estimates. For the year ended December 31, 2013, we produced approximately 5,800 short tons of soda ash per employee. Based on historical production statistics we believe this production metric exceeds that of the other three operators in the Green River Basin. Strong Safety Record. We have an outstanding track record for safety, and we have among the lowest instances of workplace injury in the U.S. mining industry. Our tradition of excellence in safety has been recognized by the Wyoming State Mine Inspector, which has awarded us its Safety Excellence Award for five consecutive years from 2008 to 2012. We also received three consecutive safety awards from the U.S. Industrial Minerals Association of North America and the Mine Safety and Health Administration from 2009 to 2011. In addition, the safety performance of our facilities, as measured by the number of citations, recordable injuries and lost work day injuries and accident incident rate, significantly exceeds that of our peers in the Green River Basin over the last five years, according to the Mine Safety and Health Administration. We believe this emphasis on, and track record of, safety keeps the morale high for our sponsor's existing employees who operate our assets and enables our sponsor to recruit and retain the most qualified workers in the Green River Basin to operate our assets. Stable Customer Relationships. We have an extensive base of over 75 domestic customers in industries such as flat glass, container glass, detergents, chemicals, paper and other consumer and industrial products. We have long-term relationships with many of our customers due to our competitive pricing, reliable shipping and high quality soda ash. For the year ended December 31, 2013, approximately 70% of our domestic net sales were made to customers with whom we have done business for over ten years. We believe that these relationships lead to stable cash flows. We have a strong, long-standing relationship with our primary export customer, ANSAC. ANSAC is a cooperative that serves as the primary international distribution channel for us and two other U.S. manufacturers of trona-based soda ash. ANSAC is one of the largest purchasers and exporters of soda ash in the world and, as a result, is able to leverage its economies of scale in the markets it serves. We believe that our customer relationships, including our relationship with ANSAC, lead to more stable cash flows and allow us to plan production activity more accurately. Experienced Management and Workforce. Our facility has been in continuous operation for over 50 years. We are able to build on the collective knowledge gained from our experience during this period to continually improve our operations and introduce innovative processes. In addition, many members of OCI Wyoming's senior management team have more than 20 years of relevant industry experience. Our executives lead a highly productive workforce with an average tenure of more than 18 years. We believe our 9


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    Table of Contents institutional knowledge, coupled with the relative seniority of our workforce, engenders a strong sense of teamwork and collegiality, which has led to one of the safest and most efficient operations in the industry today. Our Business Strategies Our primary business objective is to generate stable cash flows, allowing us to make quarterly cash distributions to our common and subordinated unitholders and, over time, to increase those quarterly cash distributions. To achieve our objective, we intend to execute the following key business strategies: Capitalize on the Growing Demand for Soda Ash. We believe that as one of the leading low-cost producers of trona-based soda ash, we are well-positioned to capitalize on the worldwide growth of soda ash. While consumption of soda ash within the United States is expected to remain relatively stable in the near future, overall worldwide demand for soda ash, based on historical production statistics, is projected to grow from an estimated 53.9 million metric tons (equivalent to approximately 59.4 million short tons) to almost 75 million metric tons (equivalent to approximately 82.6 million short tons) in 2022, which represents a compounded annual growth rate of 3.3%. Through ANSAC and our own exports, as well as our long-standing relationship with domestic customers, we believe that as global demand increases, we will be well positioned to maintain our market share in the principal markets in which we operate by increasing our production through refinements in our production process and without significant additional strategic capital expenditures. Increase Operational Efficiencies. We intend to focus on increasing the efficiency of our operations. We plan to invest in our operations and improve our competitive position as one of the most cost efficient producers of soda ash in the world. We have identified opportunities to increase our annual production capacity by further streamlining our refining process and implementing certain process efficiencies. Maintain Financial Flexibility. We intend to pursue a disciplined financial policy and seek to maintain a conservative capital structure that we believe will provide enhanced stability to our existing cash flows and allow us to consider attractive growth projects and strategic acquisitions in all market environments. See Part II, Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Debt" for additional information. Expand Operations Strategically. In addition to capacity expansions and process improvements at our current facility, we plan to grow our business through various methods as they become available to us, including: (1) organic growth of our existing business by expanding our customer relationships and by making strategic capital expenditures; (2) acquisition of other businesses involved in mining and processing minerals and manufacturing chemicals; (3) acquisition of other soda ash facilities if and when they become available; and (4) acquisition of shipping, logistical or other ancillary businesses to improve our efficiencies and grow our cash flows. However, none of these opportunities may become available to us, and we may choose not to pursue any opportunities that are presented to us. We can provide no assurance that we will be able to utilize our strengths described above. For further discussion of the risks that we face, see Item 1A, "Risk Factors." 10


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    Table of Contents Our Organizational Structure The following chart depicts our ownership structure as of December 31, 2013 and approximate ownership percentages: Our Relationship with OCI Company OCI Company Ltd., the parent company of Enterprises ("OCI Company"), is a diversified, global company with its common shares listed on the Korea Exchange and its global depositary receipts listed on the Singapore Exchange Securities Trading Limited. OCI Company, its subsidiaries and its affiliates have a product portfolio consisting of inorganic chemicals, petrochemicals and coal chemicals, fine chemicals, specialty gases and renewable energy. OCI Company and its subsidiaries have produced soda ash since the late 1960s. OCI Chemical acquired its interest in OCI Wyoming in 1996. Omnibus Agreement. We entered into an omnibus agreement with Enterprises and our general partner under which we agree upon certain aspects of our relationship with them, including the provision whereby Enterprises will, or will cause certain of its affiliates, to provide to us specified administrative services and employees, our agreement to reimburse Enterprises for the cost of such services and employees, certain indemnification and reimbursement obligations, the use by us of "OCI" as part of our partnership name, and as a trademark and service mark, or as part of a trademark or service mark, for our products and services and other matters. Neither our general partner nor Enterprises will receive any management fee or other compensation in connection with our general partner's management of our business. However, prior to making any distribution on our common units, we will reimburse our general partner and its affiliates, including Enterprises, for all expenses they incur and payments they make on our behalf under the omnibus agreement and our partnership agreement. Our partnership agreement provides that our general partner will determine in good faith the expenses that are allocable to us. Additionally, we expect OCI Chemical or its affiliates, will continue to be appointed by Enterprises pursuant to the omnibus agreement, to act as our marketing and sales agent for all of our sales. Our general partner owns 399,000 general partner units representing a 2.0% general partner interest in us. These general partner units entitle it to receive 2.0% of all the distributions we make. Our general partner also owns initially all of our incentive distribution rights, which entitle it to increasing percentages, up to a maximum of 48.0%, of the cash we distribute in excess of $0.5750 per unit per quarter. In addition, OCI Holdings owns 4,775,500 common units and 9,775,500 subordinated units. 11


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    Table of Contents Our Operations Our Green River Basin surface operations are situated on approximately 880 acres in Wyoming, and our mining operations consist of approximately 23,500 acres of leased and licensed subsurface mining area. Our facility is accessible by both road and rail. We use six large continuous mining machines and ten underground shuttle cars in our mining operations. Our processing assets consist of material sizing units, conveyors, calciners, dissolver circuits, thickener tanks, drum filters, evaporators and rotary dryers. The following map provides an aerial overview of our surface operations: 12


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    Table of Contents The following map shows the known sodium leasing area within the Green River Basin, including the boundaries of our leased and licensed subsurface mining area: The Green River Basin geological formation holds the largest, and one of the highest purity, known deposits of trona ore in the world. Our reserves contain trona deposits having a purity between 85 to 89% by weight, which means that insoluble impurities and water make up approximately 10% to 15% of our trona. 13


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    Table of Contents Our mining leases and license are located in two mining beds, designated by the U.S. Geological Survey as beds 24 and 25, at depths of 800 to 1100 feet, respectively, below the surface. Mining these beds affords us several competitive advantages. First, the depth of our beds is shallower than other actively mined beds in the Green River Basin, which allows us to use a continuous mining technique to mine trona and roof bolt the ceiling simultaneously. In addition, mining two beds that are on top of one another allows for production efficiencies because we are able to use a single hoisting shaft to service both beds. The following graphic shows a cross-section of the strategic areas of the Green River Basin where we mine trona. Source: Management. We remove insoluble materials and other impurities by thickening and filtering the liquor. We then add activated carbon to our filters to remove organic impurities, which can cause color contamination in the final product. The resulting clear liquid is then crystallized in evaporators, producing sodium carbonate monohydrate. The crystals are then drawn off and passed through a centrifuge to remove excess water. We then dry the resulting material in a product dryer to form anhydrous sodium carbonate, or soda ash. The resulting processed soda ash is then stored in seven on-site storage silos to await shipment by bulk rail or truck to distributors and end customers. Our storage silos can hold up to 65,000 short tons of processed soda ash at any given time. Our facility is in good working condition and has been in service for over 50 years. Deca Rehydration. The evaporation stage of our trona ore processing produces a precipitate and natural by-product called deca. "Deca", short for sodium carbonate decahydrate, is one part soda ash and ten parts water. Solar evaporation causes deca to crystallize and precipitate to the bottom of the four main surface ponds at our Green River Basin facility. In 2009 we implemented a process called deca rehydration, which enables us to recover soda ash from the deca-rich purged liquor as a by-product of our processing process. We capture the soda ash contained in deca by allowing the deca crystals to evaporate in the sun and separating the dehydrated crystals from the soda ash. We then blend the separated deca crystals with partially processed trona ore at the dissolving stage of our production process described above. This process enables us to reduce our waste storage needs and convert what is typically a waste product into a usable raw material. Primarily as a result of this process, we have been able to reduce our ore to ash ratio by 9% over the past four years. Energy Consumption. We believe we have one of the most efficient mining and soda ash production surface operations in the world. In 2013, we used approximately 4.0 mmBTUs of energy in the form of electricity and natural gas to produce each short ton of soda ash. We believe this to be the lowest energy consumption of any soda ash producer in North America. In addition, we and other producers of soda ash in the Green River Basin benefit from relatively low cost and stable supplies of coal and natural gas in Wyoming, which further enhances our competitive cost advantage over other regions of the world. Shipping and Logistics. All of our soda ash is shipped by rail or truck from our Green River Basin operations. For the year ended December 31, 2013, we shipped approximately 96.0% of our soda ash to our customers initially via rail under a contract with 14


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    Table of Contents Union Pacific that expires on December 31, 2014, and our plant receives rail service exclusively from Union Pacific. The rail freight rate we are charged under our agreement increases annually based on a published index tied to certain rail industry metrics. If we do not ship a significant portion of our soda ash production on the Union Pacific rail line during a twelve-month period, we must pay Union Pacific a shortfall payment under the terms of our transportation agreement. We lease a fleet of more than 1,700 hopper cars that serve as dedicated modes of shipment to our domestic customers. For export, we ship our soda ash on unit trains consisting of approximately 100 cars to two primary ports: Port Arthur, Texas and Portland, Oregon. From these ports, our soda ash is loaded onto ships for delivery to ports all over the world. ANSAC provides logistics and support services for all of our export sales. For domestic sales, OCI Chemical provides similar services. The flow chart below illustrates the steps of our mining, processing and shipping operations. Customers Our largest customer is ANSAC, which buys soda ash from us (through our sales agent) and other of its member companies for further export to its customers. ANSAC takes soda ash orders directly from its overseas customers and then purchases soda ash for resale from its member companies pro rata based on each member's production volumes. ANSAC is the exclusive distributor for its members to the markets it serves. However, OCI Chemical, on our behalf, negotiates directly with, and we export to, customers in markets not served by ANSAC. For the year ended December 31, 2013, ANSAC accounted for approximately 45.3% of our net sales (years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011: approximately 49.6% and 38.3% of net sales, respectively). Other than ANSAC, for the year ended December 31, 2013, no one customer individually accounted for more than ten percent of our net sales. We had more than 75 domestic customers and 15 foreign customers to whom our agent made sales directly. For the year ended December 31, 2013, 10.6% of our net sales (years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011: 7.3% and 13.5% of net sales, respectively) were through direct exports not involving ANSAC and its affiliated distributors. For the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011, OCI Chemical served as the marketing and sales agent for OCI Wyoming with respect to all of its U.S. domestic and export sales, including sales to ANSAC. For customers other than ANSAC, our sales agent typically enters into contracts, on our behalf, which we refer to as our customer contracts, having terms ranging from three months to three years. Under these contracts, our customers generally agree to purchase either minimum estimated volumes of soda ash or a certain percentage of their soda ash requirements. Although we do not have a "take or pay" arrangement with our customers, substantially all of our sales are made pursuant to written agreements and not through spot sales. Our customers, including end users to whom ANSAC makes sales overseas, consist primarily of: Glass manufacturing companies, account for 50% or more of the consumption of soda ash around the world, including Owens-Illinois Inc., Guardian Industries, Ardagh and Arc International; and Chemical and detergent manufacturing companies, including Elementis plc, Church and Dwight Co. Inc., PQ Corporation, Procter and Gamble Company and Innophos Holdings Inc. 15


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    Table of Contents For accounts in North America, OCI Chemical, on our behalf, typically enters into sales contracts with our customers having terms of one to three years. Pursuant to these contracts, we supply an estimated annual tonnage of soda ash to a customer at a fixed price for a given calendar year. Generally speaking, we have long-term relationships with the majority of our customers, meaning we have been a supplier to them for more than five years. Leases and Licenses We are party to nine mining leases and one license, which give us subsurface mining rights. Some of our leases are renewable at our option upon expiration. We pay royalties to the State of Wyoming, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and Anadarko Petroleum or its affiliates, which are calculated based upon a percentage of the quantity or gross value of soda ash and related products at a certain stage in the mining process, or a certain sum per each ton of such products. These royalty payments are typically subject to a minimum domestic production volume from our Green River Basin facility, although we are obligated to pay minimum royalties or annual rentals to our lessors and licensor regardless of actual sales. The royalty rates we pay to our lessors and licensor may change upon our renewal of such leases and license. Under our license with Anardarko Petroleum or its affiliates, the applicable royalty rate varies based on an index. Anadarko Petroleum or its affiliates are entitled to adjust their royalty rate if we pay a higher royalty rate to certain other mineral rights owners in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. Any increase in the royalty rates we are required to pay to our lessors and licensor, or any failure by us to renew any of our leases and license, could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations, financial condition or liquidity, and. therefore, may affect our ability to distribute cash to unitholders. The following is a summary of the material terms of our leases and our license as of December 31, 2013: Number of Total Leases or Approximate Name of Lessor Licenses as of Acreage as of or December 31, December 31, Expiration Year of Licensor 2013 2013 Date Range Renewals Commencement Royalty Rate Anadarko 1 12,441 acres N/A Renewed until 2061 in 2010 1962 7% of soda ash sold (calculated on a Petroleum or its netback basis); scheduled to increase Affiliates to 8% on October 1, 2016. If royalty rates paid to other lessors are higher, royalty rates are increased to match. U.S. Government 4 7,934 acres 2017-2018 We have a preferential 1961 6% of gross output(2) renewal right upon application to the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management(1) State of Wyoming 5 3,079 acres 2019 No contractual right to 1969 6% of gross value renewal, but leases have been historically renewed for consecutive 10-year periods (1) Renewals are typically for ten-year periods. (2) On October 2, 2013, U.S. Congress passed the Helium Stewardship Act of 2013, giving U.S. natural soda ash producers some relief on royalties paid to the federal government for trona mined on federal land, reducing the royalty rate from 6% to 4%, for the next two years. The foregoing descriptions of the material terms of our leases and our license do not purport to be complete descriptions of our leases and our license, and are qualified in their entirety by reference to the full text of the leases and license, copies of which have been filed or incorporated by reference as exhibits to this Report. See Part IV, Item 15, "Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules— Exhibit Index" for more information. Trona Reserves As of December 31, 2013, we had estimated proven and probable reserves of approximately 263.1 million short tons, which is equivalent to 143.3 million short tons of soda ash. The estimates of our proven and probable reserves are derived from a year-end reserve report funded by us and prepared by Hollberg Professional Group, an independent mining and geological consulting firm. Based on a projected mining rate of 4.0 million short tons of trona per year, we have enough proven and probable trona reserves to continue mining trona for approximately 66 years. Hollberg Professional Group performed a mineral reserve estimate on our trona mineral assets, which are contained in beds 24 and 25 of the Green River Basin, at depths of 800 and 1100 feet below the surface, respectively. To ensure continuity and mineability of our trona reserves, Hollberg Professional Group's estimates are based on geological data provided by us and third parties, which were generated from historical exploration drill holes, borings within the mine space, and mine observations and measurements, 16


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    Table of Contents including core samples. In addition, Hollberg Professional Group reviewed and analyzed our reserve base maps and current mining plans, and developed a life of mine plan with respect to the predicted life of our reserves using a non-subsidence design. Our trona reserve estimates include reserves that can be economically and legally extracted and processed into soda ash at the time of their determination. Our trona reserves are categorized as "proven (measured) reserves" and "probable (indicated) reserves," which are defined as follows: Proven (Measured) Reserves—Reserves for which: (a) quantity is computed from dimensions revealed in outcrops, trenches, workings or drill holes; grade and/or quality are computed from the results of detailed sampling and (b) the sites for inspection, sampling and measurement are spaced so closely and the geologic character is so well defined that size, shape, depth and mineral content of reserves are well-established. Probable (Indicated) Reserves—Reserves for which quantity and grade and/or quality are computed from information similar to that used for proven (measured) reserves, but the sites for inspection, sampling, and measurement are farther apart or are otherwise less adequately spaced. The degree of assurance, although lower than that for proven (measured) reserves, is high enough to assume continuity between points of observation. For purposes of categorizing our proven reserves, Hollberg Professional Group's estimates applied exploration and mine measurements and drill hole data within a one-quarter mile radius, and required at least 8-feet of trona thickness and a trona ore grade of at least 85% (with 15% of clays, shales and other impurities). For purposes of categorizing our probable reserves, Hollberg Professional Group's estimates applied exploration and mine measurements and drill hole data within a three-quarter mile radius, and required at least 8-feet of trona thickness and a trona ore grade of at least 85% (with 15% of clays, shales and other impurities). To assess the economic viability of our reserves, Hollberg Professional Group reviewed our cost of products sold and average sales price of soda ash for the three years ended December 31, 2013. In determining whether our reserves meet these proven and probable standards, Hollberg Professional Group made certain assumptions regarding the remaining life of our reserves, including, among other things, that: our cost of products sold per short ton will remain consistent with our cost of products sold for the three years ended December 31, 2013, which was approximately $79 per short ton of soda ash; the average CIF (carriage, insurance, and freight) sales price will remain consistent with our historical average CIF sales price for the three years ended December 31, 2013, which was approximately $183 per short ton of soda ash; we will achieve an annual mining rate of approximately 4.0 million short tons of trona; we will process soda ash with a 90% recovery rate without accounting for our deca rehydration process; the ore to ash ratio for the stated trona reserves is 1.835:1.0 (short tons of trona run-of-mine to short tons of soda ash); our run-of-mine ore estimate contains dilution from the mining process; we will, in approximately 30-40 years, make necessary equipment modifications to operate at a seam height of 7-feet, although our current mining limit is 9 to 10 feet; we will, within the next four to nine years, conduct "two-seam mining," which means to perform continuous mining simultaneously on beds 24 and 25 in close proximity; our mining costs will remain consistent with 2013 levels until we begin two-seam mining, at which time our mining costs for the two-seam mine tonnage will increase by approximately 25%; our processing costs will remain consistent with 2013 levels; we will continue to conduct only conventional mining using the room and pillar method and a non-subsidence mine design; we have and will continue to have valid leases and licenses in place with respect to the reserves, and that these leases and licenses can be renewed for the life of the mine based on our extensive history of renewing leases and licenses; we have and will continue to have the necessary permits to conduct mining operations with respect to the reserves; and we will maintain the necessary tailings storage capacity to maintain tailings disposal between the mine and surface placement for the life-of-mine. Our reserves are subject to leases with the State of Wyoming and the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and a license with Anadarko Petroleum or its affiliates. See "Leases and Licenses" above for a summary of these leases and our license, including expiration date ranges. 17


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    Table of Contents The following table presents our estimated proven and probable trona reserves at December 31, 2013: Average Average Run-of-Mine Run-of-Mine Grade of Grade of Proven Probable Soda Ash Produced Proven Trona Probable Trona Total Proven and from Total Proven Right of Access and Trona Reserves Trona Reserves Probable Trona and Probable Trona Extraction Reserves (% Trona)(1) Reserves (% Trona)(1) Reserves(2) Reserves(3) (In millions of short tons except percentages)(4) License with Anadarko Petroleum or its affiliates 71.7 86.1% 64.7 85.4% 136.4 74.3 Leases with the U.S. Government 51.1 86.2% 50.4 85.4% 101.5 55.2 Leases with the State of Wyoming 7.0 86.5% 18.2 86.0% 25.2 13.8 Total(5) 129.8 86.2% 133.3 85.5% 263.1 143.3 (1) For purposes of these estimates, the minimum grade for reported tonnage is 85%. (2) The average run-of-mine trona grade, or the percentage of the raw trona mined that comprises soda ash, of our proven and probable trona reserves is approximately 86.2% and 85.5%, respectively. These estimates assume out-of-seam dilution of 4 inches. The price used to estimate our proven and probable trona reserves was our historical average CIF (carriage, insurance and freight) sales price for the three years ended December 31, 2013, which was approximately $183 per short ton of soda ash. (3) Soda ash conversion assumes a 90% recovery rate, resulting in an ore to ash ratio of 1.835:1.0. (4) The sums of some of the rows and columns may not foot due to rounding. (5) Except percentages, which are averages. Our reserve estimates will change from time to time as a result of mining activities, analysis of new engineering and geologic data, modification of mining plans or mining methods and other factors. For addition information, see Item 1A, Risk Factors, "Risks Inherent in Our Business and Industry" for more information regarding risks surrounding our reserves. Competition Soda ash is a commodity chemical traded globally with numerous producers and consumers worldwide. We compete with both North American and international soda ash producers. There are two ways to consider how we compete: (1) versus our fellow North American competitors; and (2) versus our worldwide competitors. Against our principal North American competitors, which include subsidiaries of FMC, Solvay and Tata in the Green River Basin and Searles Valley Minerals in California, we believe we have a number of competitive advantages, including operational advantages that improve our relative cost position, life of our mineral reserves, our strong safety record, customer relationships and an experienced management team and workforce. Against our principal worldwide competitors, Solvay, Tata and Nirma Group, virtually all of their production is manufactured from synthetic processes and we believe, as a producer of soda ash from trona, we have significant competitive advantages, even after considering the fact that we generally have higher logistics costs to move the soda ash from Wyoming to regions around the world. First, the costs associated with procuring the materials needed for synthetic production are greater than the costs associated with mining trona. In addition, we believe trona-based production consumes less energy and produces fewer undesirable by-products than synthetic production. See "Our Competitive Strengths" above for additional information. Insurance Because all of our operations are conducted at a single facility, an event such as an explosion, fire, equipment malfunction or severe weather conditions could significantly disrupt our trona mining or soda ash production operations and our ability to supply soda ash to our customers. These hazards can also cause personal injury and loss of life, pollution or environmental damage and suspension of our surface and subsurface operations. To mitigate this risk, our sponsor maintains, on our behalf, property, casualty and business interruption insurance in amounts and with coverage and deductibles that we believe are adequate for our current operations. We continually evaluate our policy limits and deductibles as they relate to the overall cost and scope of our insurance coverage to account for changes or growth in our business. 18


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    Table of Contents Environmental Matters Our mining and processing operations, which have been conducted at our Green River Basin facility for many years, are subject to strict regulation by federal, state and local authorities with respect to protection of the environment. We have a rigorous compliance program to ensure that our facilities comply with environmental laws and regulations. However, we are involved from time to time in administrative and judicial proceedings and inquiries relating to environmental matters. Modifications or changes in enforcement of existing laws and regulations or the adoption of new laws and regulations in the future, particularly with respect to environmental or climate change, or changes in the operation of our business or the discovery of additional or unknown environmental contamination, could require expenditures which might be material to our results of operations or financial conditions. We summarize below certain environmental laws applicable to us that regulate discharges of substances into the air and water, the management and disposal of hazardous substances and wastes, the clean-up of contaminated sites, the protection of groundwater quality and availability, plant and wildlife protection, and climate change. Our failure to comply with any of the below laws may result in the assessment of administrative, civil and criminal penalties, the imposition of clean-up and site restoration costs and liens, the issuance of injunctions to limit or cease operations, the suspension or revocation of permits and other enforcement measures that could have the effect of limiting production from our operations. Clean Air Act The federal Clean Air Act and comparable state laws restrict the emission of air pollutants from many sources. Under the Clean Air Act, our facility has been issued a Title V operating permit, which regulates emissions to air from our operations. In particular, our operations are subject to technology-based standards pursuant to the Clean Air Act's New Source Performance Standards for Nonmetallic Mineral Processing Plants, which limit particulate matter emissions. In addition, our boilers are subject to technology- based standards pursuant to the Clean Air Act's National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Source: Industrial, Commercial and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters, which were published in final form in January 2013. These laws and regulations may require us to obtain pre-approval for the construction or modification of certain projects or facilities expected to produce or significantly increase air emissions, obtain and strictly comply with stringent air permit requirements or utilize specific equipment or technologies to control emissions of certain pollutants. Clean Water Act The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, which we refer to as the Clean Water Act, and comparable state laws impose restrictions and controls regarding the discharge of pollutants into regulated waters. The discharge of pollutants into regulated waters is prohibited, except in accordance with the terms of a permit issued by the federal EPA or the state. We do not discharge any wastewater from our operations into the Green River, the nearest river system to our Green River Basin facility. However, the discharge of storm water runoff from our facility is governed by a general permit issued by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. In particular, the general permit requires our compliance with a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan. We periodically monitor groundwater wells at our processing facility, most of which are proximate to our surface pond complex, for salinity, conductivity and other parameters pursuant to permits issued by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. Permitted interceptor trenches are used to collect saline groundwater to prevent discharge and impact to the Green River. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act The federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, or RCRA, and analogous state laws, impose requirements for the careful generation, handling, storage, treatment and disposal of nonhazardous and hazardous solid wastes. Based on the amount of hazardous waste our operations generate (more than 100 kilograms but less than 1,000 kilograms per month), we have been classified under RCRA as a Small Quantity Generator. RCRA limits and regulates the manner and duration of our on-site storage/accumulation of hazardous waste, requires us to dispose of our hazardous waste off-site using manifests, licensed transporters and licensed disposal facilities, and imposes certain training and operational requirements on us. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act The federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, or CERCLA, (otherwise known as "Superfund") and comparable state laws impose liability in connection with the release of hazardous substances into the environment. CERCLA imposes liability, without regard to fault or the legality of the original conduct, on certain classes of persons that are considered to have contributed to the release of a hazardous substance into the environment. These persons include the current and past owner or operator of the disposal site or the site where the release occurred and those who disposed or arranged for the disposal of the hazardous substances at the site where the release occurred. Under CERCLA, such persons may be subject to joint and several liability for the costs of cleaning up the hazardous substances that have been released into the environment and for damages to natural resources. Wyoming's Environmental Quality Act also creates the potential for liability in connection with the release of hazardous substances into the environment, and has been construed to impose liability without regard to fault. We have not received notice that we are a potentially responsible party at any Superfund site. 19


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    Table of Contents Climate Change Legislation and Regulations In response to findings that emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases, or GHGs, present an endangerment to public health and the environment, the EPA has adopted rules requiring the monitoring and annual reporting of GHG emissions from specified sources, including soda ash processors like us. We are monitoring and reporting GHG emissions from our operations, and we believe we are in substantial compliance with the rules. In the past, the U.S. Congress has considered, but not enacted, legislation that would impose requirements to reduce emissions of GHGs. The State of California recently enacted regulations establishing a so-called GHG "cap-and-trade" system designed to reduce GHG emissions. Our operations are not currently subject to any federal or state requirement to reduce GHG emissions. Although it is not possible at this time to predict how legislation or new regulations that may be adopted to address GHG emissions would impact our business, any such future laws and regulations limiting, or otherwise imposing a tax or financial penalty for, emissions of GHGs from our equipment and operations might be material to our results of operations or financial conditions. Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality—Land Quality Division Our operations are subject to oversight by the Land Quality Division of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. In particular, our principal mine permit issued by the Land Quality Division requires us to "self-bond" for the estimated future cost to reclaim the area of our processing facility, surface pond complex and on-site sanitary landfill. As of December 31, 2013, the amount of the self-bond was $27.1 million. The amount of the bond is subject to change based upon periodic re-evaluation by the Land Quality Division. Mining and Workplace Safety The U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration, or MSHA, is the primary regulatory organization governing safety matters associated with trona ore mining. Accordingly, MSHA regulates underground mines and the industrial mineral processing facilities associated with trona ore mines. MSHA administers the provisions of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 and enforces compliance with that statute's mandatory safety and health standards. As part of MSHA's oversight, representatives perform at least four unannounced inspections (quarterly) annually for our entire facility. To date these inspections have not resulted in any citations for major violations of MSHA's Code of Federal Regulations. We also are subject to the requirements of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Act, or OSHA, and comparable state statutes that regulate the protection of the health and safety of workers. In addition, the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard requires that information be maintained about hazardous materials used or produced in operations and that this information be provided to employees, state and local government authorities and the public. Our Green River Basin facility maintains a rigorous safety program. Our sponsor's employees and contractors who operate our assets are required to complete 40 hours of initial training, as well as eight-hour annual refresher sessions. These training programs cover all of the potential site-specific hazards present at the facility. As a direct result of our commitment to safety, the Green River Basin facility has had an exceptional safety record in recent years. During the year ended December 31, 2013, our facility had only two lost work day injuries and only six recordable injuries as reported by MSHA. Over the five years ended December 31, 2013, the Green River Basin facility averaged 1.4 lost work day injuries and only 4.6 recordable injuries as reported by MSHA, which we believe to be better than the industry average. Employees/Labor Relations We are managed by the directors and officers of our general partner. The personnel who operate our assets are employees of our sponsor. Under the omnibus agreement, we reimburse Enterprises and its affiliates for the expenses incurred by them in providing services to us, and we also reimburse Enterprises for certain direct operating expenses they pay on our behalf. As of December 31, 2013, Enterprises and its affiliates had 415 employees at our facility in the Green River Basin that operate the mine, 122 of whom were full-time salaried employees. None of these employees was covered by a collective bargaining agreement as of December 31, 2013, and we did not experience any labor strikes or other significant labor problems during 2013. ITEM 1A. Risk Factors Limited partner interests are inherently different from the capital stock of a corporation, although many of the business risks to which we are subject are similar to those that would be faced by a corporation engaged in a similar business. You should carefully consider the following risk factors together with all of the other information included in this Report in evaluating an investment in our common units. 20


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    Table of Contents If any of the following risks were to occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations and our ability to distribute cash could be materially adversely affected. In that case, we might not be able to make distributions on our common units, the trading price of our common units could decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment. Risks Inherent in Our Business and Industry We may not have sufficient cash from operations following the establishment of cash reserves and payment of fees and expenses, including cost reimbursements to our general partner and its affiliates, to enable us to pay the minimum quarterly distribution on our units. In order to pay the minimum quarterly distribution of $0.5000 per unit, or $2.00 per unit on an annualized basis, we will require available cash of approximately $10 million per quarter, or $40 million per year, based on the number of common, subordinated and general partner units currently outstanding. We may not have sufficient available cash each quarter to pay the minimum quarterly distribution. The amount of cash we can distribute on our units principally depends upon the amount of cash we generate from our operations, which will fluctuate from quarter to quarter based on several factors, some of which are beyond our control, including, among other things: the market prices for soda ash in the markets in which we sell; the volume of natural and synthetic soda ash produced worldwide; domestic and international demand for soda ash in the flat glass, container glass, detergent, chemical and paper industries in which our customers operate or serve; the freight costs we pay to transport our soda ash to customers or various delivery points; the cost of electricity and natural gas used to power our operations; the amount of royalty payments we are required to pay to our lessors and licensor and the duration of our leases and license; political disruptions in the international markets we or our customers serve, including any changes in trade barriers; our relationships with our customers and our or our sales agent's ability to renew contracts; the creditworthiness of our customers; regulatory action affecting the supply of, or demand for, soda ash, our ability to mine trona ore, our transportation logistics, our operating costs or our operating flexibility; new or modified statutes, regulations, governmental policies and taxes or their interpretations; and prevailing U.S. and international economic conditions. In addition, the actual amount of cash we will have available for distribution will depend on other factors, some of which are beyond our control, including, among other things: the level and timing of capital expenditures we make; the level of our operating, maintenance and general and administrative expenses, including reimbursements to our general partner for services provided to us; the cost of acquisitions, if any; our debt service requirements and other liabilities; fluctuations in our working capital needs; our ability to borrow funds and access capital markets; restrictions on distributions contained in debt agreements to which we, OCI Wyoming or OCI Chemical are a party; the amount of cash reserves established by our general partner; and other business risks affecting our cash levels. 21


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    Table of Contents Soda ash prices have been and in the future may be volatile, and lower soda ash prices will negatively affect our financial position and results of operations. Our only product is soda ash, and the market price of soda ash directly affects the profitability of our operations. If the market price for soda ash declines, our revenue may decrease. Historically, the global market and, to a lesser extent, the domestic market for soda ash have been volatile, and those markets are likely to remain volatile in the future. In the past, we have reduced production to mitigate the impact of low soda ash prices. Volatility in soda ash prices can make it difficult to predict the cash we may have on hand at any given time, and a prolonged period of low soda ash prices may materially and adversely affect our financial position, liquidity (including our borrowing capacity under the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility), ability to finance planned capital expenditures and results of operations. To illustrate the volatility of the price of soda ash, according to IHS data, over the last six years, the weighted average price of soda ash in the U.S. has ranged from a high of $159 per short ton in 2013 to a low of $128 per short ton in 2008. Over the same period, the weighted average price of soda ash in Europe, India and South America, the three regions with the highest soda ash demand outside of the United States and China, ranged from a high of $266 per short ton in 2008 to a low of $197 per short ton in 2010, with a weighted average price of $229 per short ton in 2012 and $238 per short ton in 2013. Prices for soda ash may fluctuate in response to relatively minor changes in the supply of and demand for soda ash, market uncertainty and other factors beyond our control. These factors include, among other things: overall economic conditions; the level of customer demand, including in the glassmaking industry; the level of production and exports of soda ash globally; the level of production of materials used to produce soda ash, including trona ore or synthetic materials, globally; the cost of energy consumed in the production of soda ash, including the price of natural gas, electricity and coal; the impact of non-ANSAC members increasing their capacity and exports; domestic and foreign governmental relations, regulations and taxes; and political conditions or hostilities and unrest in regions where we export soda ash. A substantial portion of our costs are attributable to transportation and freight costs. Increases in freight costs could increase our costs significantly and adversely affect our results of operations. Most soda ash is sold inclusive of transportation costs, which make up a substantial portion of the total delivered cost to the customer. We transport our soda ash by rail or truck and ocean vessel. As a result, our business and financial results are sensitive to increases in rail freight, trucking and ocean vessel rates. Increases in transportation costs, including increases resulting from emission control requirements, port taxes and fluctuations in the price of fuel, could make soda ash a less competitive product for glass manufacturers when compared to glass substitutes or recycled glass, or could make our soda ash less competitive than soda ash produced by competitors that have other means of transportation or are located closer to their customers. Under our current rail transport contract, our rail freight rates increase each year based upon an industry price index. We may be unable to pass on our freight and other transportation costs in full because market prices for soda ash are generally determined by supply and demand forces. An increase in natural gas prices, or an interruption in our natural gas supply would negatively impact our competitive cost position when compared to other foreign and domestic soda ash producers. We rely on natural gas as the main energy source in our soda ash production process, and therefore the cost of natural gas is a significant component of the total production cost for our soda ash. Natural gas prices have historically been volatile, with the Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price ranging between $1.63 and $18.48 per mmBTU during the period from 1999 to 2013. As of December 31, 2013, the NYMEX natural gas futures closing price was $4.23 per mmBTU (December 31, 2012: $3.35 per mmBTU). Furthermore, the price of natural gas could increase as a result of reduced domestic drilling and production activity. Drilling and production operations are subject to extensive federal, state, local and foreign laws and government regulations concerning, among other things, emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases, hydraulic fracturing, and the handling of natural gas and other substances used in connection with natural gas operations, such as drilling fluids and wastewater. In addition, natural gas operations are subject to extensive federal, state and local taxation. More stringent legislation, regulation or taxation of natural gas drilling activity in the United States could directly curtail such activity or increase the cost of drilling, resulting in reduced levels of drilling activity and therefore increased natural gas prices. Although we have a policy of making forward purchases of approximately one-third of our natural gas needs within six months of use, we have not historically used, derivative instruments to hedge our exposure to natural gas prices. Any material 22


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    Table of Contents increase in natural gas prices could adversely impact our operations by making us less competitive with other soda ash producers who do not use natural gas as a key input. If U.S. natural gas prices were to increase to a level where foreign soda ash producers were able improve their competitive position on a unit cost basis, this would negatively affect our competitive cost position. All of our operations are conducted at one facility. Any adverse developments at our facility could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and therefore our ability to make cash distributions to our unitholders. Because all of our operations are conducted at a single facility, an event such as an explosion, fire, equipment malfunction or severe weather conditions that adversely affect our facility could significantly disrupt our trona mining or soda ash production operations and our ability to supply soda ash to our customers. While our sponsor maintains business interruption insurance, our policy includes a 15 day equivalent time element deductible, per occurrence, and is subject to customary limitations and exclusions. Any sustained disruption in our ability to meet our obligations under our sales agreements could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and therefore our ability to distribute cash to unitholders. Due to our lack of product diversification, adverse developments in the soda ash industry would adversely affect our results of operations and our ability to make cash distributions to our unitholders. We rely exclusively on the revenues generated from the production and sale of soda ash. An adverse development in the market for soda ash in U.S. or foreign markets would have a significantly greater impact on our operations and cash available for distribution to our unitholders than it would on other companies that have a more diverse asset and product base. Some of the soda ash producers with which we compete sell a more diverse range of products to broader markets. For the year ended December 31, 2013, approximately 96.0% of our soda ash was shipped via rail, and we rely on one rail line to service our facility under a contract that expires in 2014. Interruptions of service on this rail line could adversely affect our results of operations and our ability to make cash distributions to our unitholders. For the year ended December 31, 2013, we shipped approximately 96.0% of our soda ash from our facility on a single rail line under a contract with the Union Pacific Railroad Company, or Union Pacific. Our current transportation contract with Union Pacific expires on December 31, 2014 and there can be no assurance that it will be renewed on terms favorable to us or at all. Rail operations are subject to various risks that may result in a delay or lack of service at our facility, including mechanical problems, extreme weather conditions, work stoppages, labor strikes, terrorist attacks and operating hazards. Moreover, if Union Pacific's financial condition were adversely affected, it could decide to cease or suspend service to our facility. If we are unable to ship soda ash by rail, it would be impracticable to ship all of our soda ash by truck and it would be cost-prohibitive to construct a rail connection to the closest alternative rail line that is approximately 140 miles from our facility. Any delay or failure in the rail services on which we rely could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our unitholders. Moreover, if we do not ship a significant portion of our soda ash production on the Union Pacific rail line during a twelve-month period, we must pay Union Pacific a shortfall payment under the terms of our transportation agreement. A significant portion of the demand for soda ash comes from glass manufacturers and other industrial end users whose businesses can be adversely affected by economic downturns. A significant portion of the demand for soda ash comes from glass manufacturers and other industrial customers. Companies that operate in the industries that glass manufacturers serve, including the automotive, construction and glass container industries, may experience significant fluctuations in demand for their own end products because of economic conditions, changes in consumer demand, or increases in raw material and energy costs. In addition, many large end users of soda ash depend upon the availability of credit on favorable terms to make purchases of raw materials such as soda ash. As interest rates increase or if our customers' creditworthiness deteriorates, this credit may be expensive or difficult to obtain. If these customers cannot obtain credit on favorable terms, they may be forced to reduce their purchases of soda ash. These and other factors may lead some customers to seek renegotiation or cancellation of their existing arrangements with us, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and our ability to distribute cash to unitholders. A significant portion of our international sales of soda ash are to ANSAC, a U.S. export cooperative, and therefore adverse developments at ANSAC or its customers, or in any of the markets in which we make direct international sales, could adversely affect our ability to compete in certain international markets. We, along with two other U.S. trona-based soda ash producers, utilize ANSAC as our exclusive export vehicle for sales to customers in all countries excluding Canada, South Africa and members of the European Community and European Free Trade Area, which provides us with the benefits of large purchases of soda ash and significant economies of scale in managing international sales and logistics. Because ANSAC makes sales to its end customers directly and then allocates a portion of such sales to each member, we do not have direct access to ANSAC's customers and we have no direct control over the credit or other terms ANSAC extends to its customers. As a result, we are indirectly vulnerable to ANSAC's customer relationships and the credit 23


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    Table of Contents and other terms ANSAC extends to its customers. Any adverse change in ANSAC's customer relationships could have a direct impact on ANSAC's ability to make sales and our ability to make sales to ANSAC. In addition, to the extent ANSAC extends credit or other favorable terms to its end customers and those customers subsequently default under sales contracts or otherwise fail to perform, we would have no direct recourse against them. Furthermore, from time to time international competition authorities have conducted inquiries into the potentially anti- competitive nature of ANSAC's activities. The Secretariat of Economic Law of the Ministry Justice of Brazil has commenced an investigation into ANSAC's activities in Brazil. OCI Chemical and the two other members of ANSAC have been named in these investigations. An unfavorable outcome in any such investigation could result in our having to pay fines or penalties, either on behalf of OCI Chemical or through ANSAC, or otherwise adversely affect the ability of ANSAC to continue serving export markets. In the event of an unfavorable outcome in any such investigation, the withdrawal of one of the other two members of ANSAC or the dissolution of ANSAC, we would be forced to use alternative methods to facilitate additional direct export sales, resulting in less favorable arrangements in respect of logistics or sales. Any of these developments could lead us to incur significant additional costs and may result in lower pricing for our export sales, which could have a negative impact on our results of operations, financial condition and our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. For more information about ANSAC, see Item 1, "Business—Customers." If the percentage of our international sales increases as a percentage of total sales, our gross margin could decrease and the average trade credit payment period of our customers could increase, which could adversely affect our financial position and our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. From 2012 to 2013, our international sales of soda ash as a percentage of total sales decreased from 56.9% to 55.9%. Our gross margin for international sales is lower than our gross margin for domestic sales because the average price of soda ash sold internationally is lower than the average price of soda ash sold domestically. Lower margins could adversely affect our financial position and our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. We typically receive payment for our domestic sales 38 to 53 days following the date of shipment, while for international sales, we typically receive payment 89 to 104 days following the date of shipment. Therefore, an increase in our international sales and a decrease in domestic sales would extend the average time period for our receipt of payment for our soda ash, which could expose us to greater credit risk from our customers, increase our working capital requirements and negatively affect the amount of cash available for distribution to our unitholders. OCI Chemical, on our behalf, typically enters into contracts and exclusive arrangements with our customers that have terms of three months to three years, and our customers are not obligated to purchase any amount of soda ash from us. The terms of our customer contracts vary by geography. Most of our domestic contracts have terms of one to three years. Our European contracts typically have a term of one year, and some Asian contracts have only a three-month term. We understand that ANSAC's customer contract terms also vary by region. Moreover, our customer contracts are not exclusive dealing or take-or-pay arrangements. Additionally, we may lose a customer for any number of reasons, including as a result of a merger or acquisition, the selection of another provider of soda ash, business failure or bankruptcy of the customer or dissatisfaction with our performance or pricing. Loss of any of our major customers could adversely affect our business, results of operations and cash flow. Increased use of glass substitutes and recycled glass may affect demand for soda ash, which could adversely affect our result of operations. Increased use of glass substitutes or recycled glass in the container industry could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. Container glass production is one of the principal end markets for soda ash. Competition from increased use of glass substitutes, such as plastic and recycled glass, has had a negative effect on demand for soda ash. Demand for soda ash by the glass container industry has generally declined over the last ten years. We believe that the use of containers containing alternative materials such as plastic and aluminum will continue to affect negatively the growth in domestic demand for soda ash. We are exposed to trade credit risk in the ordinary course of our business activities. We extend credit to our customers as a normal part of our business, and as such, are subject to the credit risk of our customers, including the risk of loss resulting from nonpayment or nonperformance. Typical industry contract terms are net 30 days from date of shipment for domestic U.S. customers. We have experienced nonperformance by our customers and counterparties in the past, and we take reserves for accounts more than 90 days past due. Some of our customers and counterparties may be highly leveraged and subject to their own operating and regulatory risks. Our credit procedures and policies may not be adequate to eliminate customer credit risk, and we may not adequately assess the creditworthiness of existing or future customers. In addition, even if our procedures work properly, our customers may experience unanticipated deterioration of their 24


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    Table of Contents creditworthiness. Material nonpayment or nonperformance by our customers could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations and on our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. We face intense competition, including from companies that have capital resources greater than ours and that have more diversified operations. We face competition from a number of soda ash producers in the United States, Europe and Asia, some of which have greater market share and greater financial, production and other resources than we do. Some of our competitors are diversified global corporations that have many lines of business. Some of our competitors have greater capital resources and may be in a better position to withstand a long term deterioration in the soda ash market. Other competitors, even if smaller in size, may have greater experience and stronger relationships in their local markets. Competitive pressures could make it more difficult for us to retain our existing customers and attract new customers, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. Competition could also intensify the negative impact of factors that decrease demand for soda ash in the markets we serve, such as adverse economic conditions, weather, higher fuel costs and taxes or other governmental or regulatory actions that directly or indirectly increase the cost or limit the use of soda ash. We expect to face competition from Turkey's trona-based soda ash production in the next several years. In addition, China is the largest producer of synthetic soda ash in the world and historically has exported only a small percentage of its production. If Chinese producers, which we believe are supported by government subsidies, and other new producers were to begin exporting significant quantities of soda ash, including on non-commercial terms, the supply of soda ash in the global market could materially increase and put downward pressure on pricing. Unfavorable economic conditions may reduce demand for our products, which could adversely affect our results of operations. Worldwide soda ash demand generally correlates to global economic growth generally. The U.S. economy and global capital and credit markets remain volatile. Worsening economic conditions or factors that negatively affect the economic health of the United States and other parts of the world into which we or ANSAC sells soda ash could reduce our revenues and adversely affect our results of operations. The recent global financial crisis and sovereign debt crises in Europe have led to a global economic slowdown, with the economies of those regions showing significant signs of weakness, resulting in greater volatility in the U.S. economy and in the global capital and credit markets. These markets have been experiencing disruption, including volatility in securities markets, diminished liquidity and credit availability, credit ratings downgrades, failure and potential failures of major financial institutions, unprecedented government support of financial institutions and high unemployment rates. Instability in consumer confidence and increased unemployment have increased concerns of prolonged economic weakness. These developments may adversely affect the ability of our customers to obtain financing to perform their obligations to us. We believe that further deterioration of economic conditions or a prolonged period of economic weakness will have an adverse impact on our results of operations, business and financial condition, as well as our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. Our reserve data are estimates based on assumptions that may be inaccurate and are based on existing economic and operating conditions that may change in the future, which could materially and adversely affect the quantities and value of our reserves. Our reserve estimates may vary substantially from the actual amounts of minerals we are be able to recover economically from our reserves. There are numerous uncertainties inherent in estimating quantities of reserves, including many factors beyond our control. Estimates of reserves necessarily depend upon a number of variables and assumptions, any one of which may, if incorrect, result in an estimate that varies considerably from actual results. These factors and assumptions relate to: future prices of soda ash, mining and production costs, capital expenditures and transportation costs; future mining technology; the effects of regulation by governmental agencies; and geologic and mining conditions, which may not be identified by available exploration data and may differ from our experiences in areas where we currently mine. Actual production, revenue and expenditures with respect to our reserves will likely vary from our estimates, and these variations may be material. Restrictions in the agreements governing OCI Wyoming's indebtedness, including the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility, could limit its operations and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and ability to make quarterly cash distributions to our unitholders. On July 18, 2013, OCI Wyoming entered into the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility. The OCI Wyoming Credit Facility contains various covenants and restrictive provisions that limit (subject to certain exceptions) OCI Wyoming's ability to: make distributions on or redeem or repurchase its units; 25


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    Table of Contents incur or guarantee additional debt; make certain investments and acquisitions; incur certain liens or permit them to exist; enter into certain types of transactions with affiliates of OCI Wyoming; merge or consolidate with another company; and transfer, sell or otherwise dispose of assets. The OCI Wyoming Credit Facility also contains covenants requiring OCI Wyoming to maintain certain financial ratios. For example, OCI Wyoming is subject to a consolidated fixed charge coverage ratio (as defined in the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility) of not less than 1.00 to 1.00 and a consolidated leverage ratio (as defined in the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility) of not greater than 3.00 to 1.00. OCI Wyoming's ability to meet those financial ratios and tests can be affected by events beyond our control, and we cannot assure you that OCI Wyoming will meet those ratios and tests. In addition, the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility contains events of default customary for transactions of this nature, including (1) failure to make payments required under the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility, (2) events of default resulting from OCI Wyoming's failure to comply with covenants and financial ratios in the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility, (3) the institution of insolvency or similar proceedings against OCI Wyoming, (4) the occurrence of a default under any other material indebtedness OCI Wyoming may have, and (5) the occurrence of a change of control. Under the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility, a change of control is triggered if OCI Chemical and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, in the aggregate, directly or indirectly, cease to own all of the equity interests, or cease to have the ability to elect a majority of the board of directors (or equivalent governing body) of OCI GP (or any entity that performs the functions of our general partner). In addition, a change of control would be triggered if we cease to own at least 50.1% of the economic interests in OCI Wyoming or cease to have the ability to elect a majority of the members of OCI Wyoming's partnership committee. The provisions of the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility may affect OCI Wyoming's ability to obtain future financing and pursue attractive business opportunities and its flexibility in planning for, and reacting to, changes in business conditions. In addition, OCI Wyoming's failure to comply with the provisions of the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility could result in an event of default, which could enable its lenders, subject to the terms and conditions of the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility, to terminate all outstanding commitments and declare any outstanding principal of that debt, together with accrued and unpaid interest, to be immediately due and payable. If the payment of OCI Wyoming's debt is accelerated, its assets may be insufficient to repay such debt in full. As a result, our results of operations and, therefore, our ability to distribute cash to unitholders, could be materially and adversely affected, and our unitholders could experience a partial or total loss of their investment. Please read Part II, Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Debt—OCI Wyoming Credit Facility" for more information. If we are not able to renew our leases and license, it will have a material adverse effect on us. Under the terms of our subsurface mining leases and license, we are required to make minimum royalty payments or annual rentals, and the royalty rates we are required to pay may change with little or no notice to us. All of our reserves are held under leases with the State of Wyoming and the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and a license with Anadarko Petroleum or its affiliates. As of December 31, 2013, leases covering approximately 42% of our acreage were scheduled to expire in the next six years. If we are not able to renew our leases and license, it will have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and cash available for distribution to unitholders. Each of those leases and the license requires that minimum royalties or annual rentals be paid regardless of production levels. If our operations do not meet production goals, then it could have an adverse effect on our ability to pay cash distributions due to the ongoing requirement to pay minimum royalty payments despite a lack of production and the corresponding net sales. Under our license with Anadarko Petroleum or its affiliates, the applicable royalty rate varies based on an index. Anadarko Petroleum or its affiliates are entitled to adjust their royalty rate if we pay a higher royalty rate to certain other mineral rights owners in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. Any increase in the royalty rates we are required to pay to our lessors or licensor, or any failure by us to renew any of our leases or our license, could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition, results of operations and ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. 26


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    Table of Contents Defects in title or loss of any leasehold interests in our properties could limit our ability to conduct mining operations on these properties or result in significant unanticipated costs. All of our trona reserves are leased or licensed. A title defect in our leased, licensed or owned property or the loss of any lease or license upon expiration of its term, upon a default or otherwise could adversely affect our ability to mine the associated reserves and/or process the trona that we mine. In some cases, we rely on title information or representations and warranties provided by our lessors, licensor or grantors. We cannot rely on any such representations or warranties with respect to the surface land on which our facility is located because we acquired the surface land in 1991 by quitclaim deed. We have no title insurance for our interests in this property. Any challenge to our title or leasehold interests could delay our operations and could ultimately result in the loss of some or all of our interest in the property. From time to time we also may be in default with respect to leases or the license for properties on which we have mining operations. In such events, we may have to close down or alter significantly the sequence of such mining operations, which may adversely affect our future soda ash production and future revenues. If we mine on property that we do not own, lease or license, we could incur liability for such mining and be subject to regulatory sanction and penalties. Also, in any such case, the investigation and resolution of title issues would divert management's time from our business, and our results of operations could be adversely affected. As a result, our results of operations, business and financial condition, as well as our ability to pay distributions to our unitholders may be materially adversely affected. Mining development, exploration and processing operations pose numerous hazards and uncertainties that may negatively affect our business. Mining and processing operations involve many hazards and uncertainties, including, among other things: seismic activity; ground failures; industrial accidents; environmental contamination or leakage; fires and explosions; unusual and unexpected rock formations or water conditions; flooding and periodic interruptions due to inclement or hazardous weather conditions or other acts of nature; and mechanical equipment failure and facility performance problems. These occurrences could damage or destroy our properties or production facilities, or result in personal injury or wrongful death claims, environmental damage to our properties or the properties of others, delays in, or prohibitions on, mining or processing, increased production costs, asset write downs, monetary losses and legal liability, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. In particular, underground mining and related processing activities present inherent risks of injury to persons and damage to equipment. Our insurance policies provide limited coverage for some of these risks but will not fully cover these risks. Please read “Risk Factors—Risks Inherent in Our Business and Industry—Our business is subject to inherent risk, including risk relating to natural disasters, and our insurance coverage for such risks may not be adequate or available to us. If an accident or event occurs that is not fully insured, it could materially affect our business.” Significant mine accidents could occur, potentially resulting in a mine shutdown or leading to liabilities, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. We may be unable to obtain, maintain or renew permits necessary for our operations, which could impair our ability to conduct our operations and limit our ability to make distributions to unitholders. Our facility and operations require us to obtain a number of permits that impose strict regulations on various environmental and operational matters in connection with mining trona ore and producing soda ash. These include permits issued by various federal, state and local agencies and regulatory bodies. The permitting rules, and the interpretations of these rules, are complex, change frequently and are subject to discretionary interpretations by our regulators, all of which may make compliance difficult or impractical and may impair our existing operations or the development of future facilities. The public, including non-governmental organizations, environmental groups and individuals, have certain statutory rights to comment upon and submit objections to requested permits and environmental impact statements prepared in connection with applicable regulations and otherwise engage in the permitting process, including bringing citizen's lawsuits to challenge the issuance or renewal of permits, the validity of environmental impact statements or the performance of mining activities. If permits are not issued or renewed in a timely fashion or at all or are conditioned in a manner that restricts our ability to conduct our operations economically, our cash flows may decline, which could limit our ability to distribute cash to unitholders. 27


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    Table of Contents Equipment upgrades, equipment failures and deterioration of assets may lead to production curtailments, shutdowns or additional expenditures. Our operations depend upon critical equipment that require scheduled upgrades and maintenance and may suffer unanticipated breakdowns or failures. As a result, our mining operations and processing may be interrupted or curtailed, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. As our mine ages and we deplete our trona reserves, in order to maintain current production rates over the next five to ten years, we expect to need to use smaller mining equipment or two seam mining technique, which will increase our mining costs. In addition, our maintenance capital expenditures do not include actual or estimated capital expenditures for replacement of our trona reserves. In addition, assets critical to our trona ore mining and soda ash production operations may deteriorate due to wear and tear or otherwise sooner than we currently estimate. Such deterioration may result in additional maintenance spending and additional capital expenditures. If these assets do not generate the amount of future cash flows that we expect, and we are not able to procure replacement assets in an economically feasible manner, our future results of operations may be materially and adversely affected. If any of the equipment on which we depend were severely damaged or were destroyed by fire, abnormal wear and tear, flooding, or otherwise, we may be unable to replace or repair it in a timely manner or at a reasonable cost, which would impact our ability to produce and ship soda ash, which would have a material adverse effect our results of operations, financial condition and our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. We may record impairment charges on our assets, including our reserves, that would adversely impact our results of operations and financial condition. We are required to perform impairment tests on our assets, including our trona reserves, whenever events or changes in circumstances modify the estimated useful life of or estimated future cash flows from an asset that would indicate that the carrying amount of such asset may not be recoverable or whenever management's plans change with respect to such asset. An impairment in one period may not be reversed in a later period even if prices increase. If we are required to recognize impairment charges in the future, our results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected. A shortage of skilled workers could reduce our labor productivity and increase our costs, which could negatively affect our business. Our mining and processing operations require personnel with specialized skills and experience. Our ability to be productive and profitable will depend upon our ability to employ and retain skilled workers. If we experience shortages of skilled workers in the future, our labor costs and overall productivity could be materially and adversely affected. If our labor costs increase or if we experience materially increased health and benefits costs, our results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. Severe weather conditions could have a material adverse impact on our business. Our business could be materially adversely affected by severe weather conditions. Severe weather conditions may affect our mining and processing operations by resulting in weather-related damage to our facility and equipment or impact our ability to transport soda ash from our facility. In addition, severe weather conditions could hinder our operations by causing us to halt or delay our operations, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. Our business is subject to inherent risk, including risk relating to natural disasters, and our insurance coverage for such risks may not be adequate or available to us. If an accident or event occurs that is not fully insured it could materially affect our business. We are covered by insurance policies maintained by our sponsor. These insurance policies provide limited coverage for some, but not all, of the potential risks and liabilities associated with our businesses. For some risks, we do not obtain insurance or are covered by our sponsor's policies if we believe the cost of available insurance is excessive relative to the risks presented. As a result of market conditions, premiums and deductibles for certain insurance policies can increase substantially, and certain types of insurance may become unavailable or available only for reduced amounts of coverage. As a result, we may not be able to renew our or its existing insurance policies or procure other desirable insurance on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. In addition, we cannot insure against certain environmental and pollution risks. Even where insurance coverage applies, insurers may contest their obligations to make payments. Our insurance coverage may not be adequate to cover us against losses we incur, and coverage under these policies may be depleted or may not be available to us to the extent that we otherwise exhaust its coverage limits. Our results of operations, and therefore our ability to distribute cash to unitholders, could be materially and adversely affected by losses and liabilities from uninsured or under-insured events, as well as by delays in the payment of insurance proceeds or the failure by insurers to make payments. 28


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    Table of Contents We also may incur costs and liabilities resulting from claims for damages to property or injury to persons arising from our operations. We must compensate employees for work-related injuries. If we do not make adequate provision for our workers' compensation liabilities, such claims could harm our future operating results. If we are required to pay for these fines, costs and liabilities, our financial condition, results of operations, and therefore our ability to distribute cash to unitholders, could be adversely affected. We may be subject to litigation, the disposition of which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. The nature of our operations exposes us to possible litigation claims, including disputes with customers and providers of shipping services. Some of the lawsuits may seek fines or penalties and damages in large amounts, or seek to restrict our business activities. Because of the uncertain nature of litigation and coverage decisions, we cannot predict the outcome of these matters or whether insurance claims may mitigate any damages to us. Litigation is very costly, and the costs associated with prosecuting and defending litigation matters could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. Expansion or improvement of our existing facilities may not result in revenue increases and will be subject to regulatory, environmental, political, legal and economic risks, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. One of the ways we may grow our business is through the expansion or improvement of our existing facility. The construction of additions or modifications to our existing facility involve numerous regulatory, environmental, political, legal and economic uncertainties that are beyond our control. Such expansion or improvement projects may also require the expenditure of significant amounts of capital, and financing may not be available on economically acceptable terms or at all. If we undertake these projects, they may not be completed on schedule, at the budgeted cost, or at all. Moreover, our revenue may not increase immediately upon the expenditure of funds on a particular project. As a result, we may not be able to realize our expected investment return, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. We may not achieve the acquisition component of our growth strategy. Acquisitions are an important component of our current growth strategy. We can offer no assurance that we will be able to identify any acquisition opportunities, that we will be able to grow our business through acquisitions, or that any assets or business we acquire will perform in accordance with our expectations or that our assessment concerning the value, strengths and weaknesses of assets or business acquired will prove to be correct. We have not made any acquisitions in the past, and there are currently a limited number of producers in North America with businesses similar to ours. In connection with future acquisitions, if any, we may incur debt and contingent liabilities, increased interest expense and amortization expense and significant charges relative to integration costs. In addition, our financial condition and results of operations will be adversely affected if we overpay for acquisitions. Acquisitions involve a number of special risks, including: unforeseen difficulties extending internal control over financial reporting and performing the required assessment at the newly acquired business or assets; potential adverse short-term effects on operating results through increased costs or otherwise; diversion of management's attention and failure to recruit new, and retain existing, key personnel of the acquired business or assets; failure to implement infrastructure, logistics and systems integration successfully; and the risks inherent in the systems of the acquired business and risks associated with unanticipated events or liabilities, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. We conduct our operations through a joint venture, which subjects us to additional risks that could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. OCI Wyoming is a joint venture with an affiliate of NRP. We may also enter into other joint venture arrangements with third parties in the future. NRP has, and these third parties may have, obligations that are important to the success of the joint venture, such as the obligation to pay their share of capital and other costs of the joint venture. The performance of these third party obligations, including the ability of our joint venture partner in OCI Wyoming, to satisfy their respective obligations, is outside our control. If these parties do not satisfy their obligations under the arrangement, our business may be adversely affected. Our joint venture arrangement may involve risks not otherwise present without such partner, including, for example: 29


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    Table of Contents our joint venture partner shares certain blocking rights over transactions between OCI Wyoming and its affiliates, including us; our joint venture partner may take actions contrary to our instructions or requests or contrary to our policies or objectives; although we control OCI Wyoming, we owe contractual duties to OCI Wyoming and its other owners, which may conflict with our interests and the interests of our unitholders; and disputes between us and our joint venture partner may result in delays, litigation or operational impasses. The risks described above or any failure to continue our joint venture or to resolve disagreements with our joint venture partner could adversely affect our ability to transact the business that is the subject of such joint venture, which would, in turn, negatively affect our financial condition, results of operations and ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. Restrictions in the Revolving Credit Facility could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and ability to make quarterly cash distributions to our unitholders. On July 18, 2013, we entered into the Revolving Credit Facility. The Revolving Credit Facility contains various covenants and restrictive provisions that limit (subject to certain exceptions) our ability (and the ability of our subsidiaries, including OCI Wyoming) to: make distributions on or redeem or repurchase units; incur or guarantee additional debt; make certain investments and acquisitions; incur certain liens or permit them to exist; enter into certain types of transactions with our affiliates; merge or consolidate with another company; and transfer, sell or otherwise dispose of assets. The Revolving Credit Facility also contains a covenant requiring us to maintain a consolidated fixed charge coverage ratio (as defined in the Revolving Credit Facility) of not less than 1.00 to 1.00. Our ability to meet that financial ratio and test can be affected by events beyond our control, and we cannot assure you that we will meet that ratio and test. In addition, the Revolving Credit Facility contains events of default customary for transactions of this nature, including (1) failure to make payments required under the Revolving Credit Facility, (2) events of default resulting from our failure to comply with covenants and financial ratios in the Revolving Credit Facility, (3) the institution of insolvency or similar proceedings against us, (4) the occurrence of a default under any other material indebtedness we (or any of our subsidiaries) may have, including the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility, and (5) the occurrence of a change of control. In addition, our obligations under the Revolving Credit Facility are secured by a pledge of substantially all of our assets (subject to certain exceptions), including the partnership interests in OCI Wyoming held by us. Under the Revolving Credit Facility, a change of control is triggered if OCI Chemical and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, in the aggregate, directly or indirectly, cease to own all of the equity interests, or cease to have the ability to elect a majority of the board of directors (or equivalent governing body) of, OCI Holdings or OCI GP (or any entity that performs the functions of our general partner). In addition, a change of control would be triggered if we cease to own at least 50.1% of the economic interests in OCI Wyoming or cease to have the ability to elect a majority of the members of OCI Wyoming's partnership committee. The provisions of the Revolving Credit Facility may affect our ability to obtain future financing and pursue attractive business opportunities and our flexibility in planning for, and reacting to, changes in business conditions. In addition, a failure to comply with the provisions of the Revolving Credit Facility could result in an event of default, which could enable our lenders to, subject to the terms and conditions of the Revolving Credit Facility, terminate all outstanding commitments and declare any outstanding principal of that debt, together with accrued and unpaid interest, to be immediately due and payable. If the payment of our debt is accelerated, our assets may be insufficient to repay such debt in full, the lenders could foreclose on our assets, including without limitation our ownership interests in OCI Wyoming, and our unitholders could experience a partial or total loss of their investment. Please read Part II, Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations —Liquidity and Capital Resources—Debt—Revolving Credit Facility." 30


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    Table of Contents Our level of indebtedness may increase, reducing our financial flexibility. In the future, we may incur significant indebtedness in order to make future acquisitions or to develop or expand our facilities and mining capabilities. Our level of indebtedness could affect our operations in several ways, including: a significant portion of our cash flows could be used to service our indebtedness; a high level of debt would increase our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions; the covenants contained in the agreements governing our outstanding indebtedness will limit our ability to borrow additional funds, dispose of assets, pay distributions and make certain investments; a high level of debt may place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that are less leveraged, and therefore may be able to take advantage of opportunities that our indebtedness would prevent us from pursuing; our debt covenants may also affect our flexibility in planning for, and reacting to, changes in the economy and our industry; and a high level of debt may impair our ability to obtain additional financing in the future for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, distributions or for general corporate or other purposes. A high level of indebtedness increases the risk that we may default on our debt obligations. Our ability to meet our debt obligations and to reduce our level of indebtedness depends on our future performance. General economic conditions and financial, business and other factors affect our operations and our future performance. Many of these factors are beyond our control. We may not be able to generate sufficient cash flows to pay the interest on our debt, and future working capital, borrowings or equity financing may not be available to pay or refinance such debt. Factors that will affect our ability to raise cash through an offering of our units or a refinancing of our debt include financial market conditions, the value of our assets and our performance at the time we need capital. Our general partner is a guarantor under, and its equity interests and assets (other than its general partner interests in us) are pledged as collateral for, OCI Chemical's $25 million senior secured credit facility; in the event OCI Chemical is unable to meet its obligations under that facility, or is declared bankrupt, OCI Chemical's lenders may gain control of our general partner or, in the case of bankruptcy, our partnership may be dissolved. On July 18, 2013, OCI Chemical entered into a senior secured credit facility, which we refer to as the OCI Chemical Credit Facility. Our general partner is a guarantor under the OCI Chemical Credit Facility, and all of our general partner's assets (other than its general partner interest in us) and OCI Chemical's ownership interest in our general partner are subject to a lien under the OCI Chemical Credit Facility. In the event OCI Chemical is unable to satisfy its obligations under the OCI Chemical Credit Facility and the lenders foreclose on their collateral, the lenders will own our general partner, and effectively all of its assets, which include the general partner interest in us and our incentive distribution rights. In such event, the lenders would own the entity that controls our management and operation. Moreover, in the event OCI Chemical becomes insolvent or is declared bankrupt, our general partner also may be deemed insolvent or declared bankrupt. Under the terms of our partnership agreement, the bankruptcy or insolvency of our general partner may cause a dissolution of our partnership. Restrictions in the OCI Chemical Credit Facility could limit our operations and our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. We and OCI Wyoming are indirectly affected by certain prohibitions and limitations contained in the OCI Chemical Credit Facility. Specifically, OCI Chemical has agreed (subject to certain exceptions in addition to those described below) that it will not, and will not permit any of its subsidiaries, including OCI Wyoming and us, to: make distributions on or redeem or repurchase equity interests, other than distributions to our and OCI Wyoming's unitholders to the extent no default is in effect at such time and that the required financial ratio tests are met prior to and after giving effect to such distribution; incur or guarantee additional debt, other than debt incurred under the Revolving Credit Facility or the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility, among certain other types of permitted debt; make certain investments and acquisitions, other than investments in each of OCI Wyoming and us in an amount not to exceed $2 million per calendar year, respectively, and other exceptions set forth therein; incur certain liens or permit them to exist, other than, with respect to our and OCI Wyoming's liens, an aggregate amount outstanding at any time equal to $200,000 and $1 million, respectively; enter into certain types of transaction with affiliates, other than transactions between OCI Wyoming and us; 31


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    Table of Contents merge or consolidate with another company; or transfer, sell or otherwise dispose of assets, other than our and OCI Wyoming's dispositions of assets with a net book value not to exceed $500,000 and $2.5 million, respectively, in any given year. The OCI Chemical Credit Facility also contains covenants requiring OCI Chemical to maintain certain financial ratios. For example, OCI Chemical is subject to a consolidated fixed charge coverage ratio (as defined in the OCI Chemical Credit Facility) of not less than 1.25 to 1.00 and a consolidated leverage ratio (as defined in the OCI Chemical Credit Facility) of not greater than 3.00 to 1.00. OCI Chemical's ability to meet those financial ratios and tests can be affected by events beyond our control, and we cannot assure you that OCI Chemical will meet those ratios and tests. Due to its ownership and control of our general partner, OCI Chemical has the ability to prevent OCI Wyoming and us from taking actions that would cause OCI Chemical to violate any covenants in, or otherwise to be in default under, the OCI Chemical Credit Facility. In deciding whether to prevent OCI Wyoming or us from taking any such action, OCI Chemical will have no fiduciary duty to us or our unitholders. Moreover, if we or OCI Wyoming desire to take any action, to the extent such action would not be permitted under the OCI Chemical Credit Facility, OCI Chemical would be required to seek the consent of the lenders under the OCI Chemical Credit Facility. OCI Chemical's compliance with the covenants in the OCI Chemical Credit Facility may restrict our and OCI Wyoming's ability to undertake certain actions that might otherwise be considered beneficial to us, including borrowing under the Revolving Credit Facility or the OCI Wyoming Credit Facility to finance operations or expansions or to distribute cash to our and their respective unitholders. Under the OCI Chemical Credit Facility, a change of control is triggered if Enterprises and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, in the aggregate, directly or indirectly, cease to own all of the equity interests, or cease to have the ability to elect a majority of the board of directors (or equivalent governing body) of, OCI Chemical, OCI Holdings or OCI GP (or any entity that performs the functions of our general partner). In addition, a change of control would be triggered if we cease to own at least 50.1% of the economic interests in OCI Wyoming or cease to have the ability to elect a majority of the members of OCI Wyoming's partnership committee. Any debt instruments that OCI Chemical or any of its affiliates enter into in the future, including any amendments to the OCI Chemical Credit Facility, may include additional or more restrictive limitations that may impact our ability to conduct our business. These additional restrictions could adversely affect our ability to finance our future operations or capital needs or engage in, expand or pursue our business activities. We are subject to stringent environmental laws and regulations that may expose us to significant costs and liabilities. Our operations are subject to stringent and complex federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations that govern the discharge of materials into the environment or otherwise relate to environmental protection. Examples of these laws include: the federal Clean Air Act and analogous state laws that impose obligations related to air emissions; the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, known as CERCLA or the Superfund law, and analogous state laws that regulate the cleanup of hazardous substances that may be or have been released at properties currently or previously owned or operated by us or at locations to which our wastes are or have been transported for disposal; the federal Water Pollution Control Act, or the Clean Water Act, and analogous state laws that regulate discharges from our facilities into state and federal waters, including wetlands and the Green River; the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, or RCRA, and analogous state laws that impose requirements for the storage, treatment and disposal of solid and hazardous waste from our facilities; the Endangered Species Act, or ESA; and the Toxic Substances Control Act, or TSCA, and analogous state laws that impose requirements on the use, storage and disposal of various chemicals and chemical substances at our facility. These laws and regulations may impose numerous obligations that are applicable to our operations, including the acquisition of permits to conduct regulated activities, the incurrence of capital or operating expenditures to limit or prevent releases of materials from our facility, and the imposition of substantial liabilities and remedial obligations for pollution resulting from our operations. Numerous governmental authorities, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or the EPA, and analogous state agencies, have the power to enforce compliance with these laws and regulations and the permits issued under them, oftentimes requiring difficult and costly corrective actions. Failure to comply with these laws, regulations and permits may result in the assessment of administrative, civil and criminal penalties, the imposition of remedial obligations and the issuance of injunctions limiting or preventing some or all of our operations. In addition, we may experience a delay in obtaining or be unable 32


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    Table of Contents to obtain required permits or regulatory authorizations, which may cause us to lose potential and current customers, interrupt our operations and limit our growth and revenue. In addition, future changes in environmental or other laws may result in additional compliance expenditures that have not been pre-funded and which could adversely affect our business and results of operations and our ability to make cash distributions to our unitholders. There is a risk that we may incur costs and liabilities in connection with our operations due to historical industry operations and waste disposal practices, our handling of wastes and potential emissions and discharges related to our operations. Private parties, including the owners of the properties on which we operate, may have the right to pursue legal actions to require remediation of contamination or enforce compliance with environmental requirements as well as to seek damages for personal injury or property damage. For example, an accidental release from our facility could subject us to substantial liabilities arising from environmental cleanup and restoration costs, claims made by neighboring landowners and other third parties for personal injury and property damage and fines or penalties for related violations of environmental laws or regulations. Under the terms of the omnibus agreement, our sponsor will indemnify us for certain potential environmental and toxic tort claims, losses and expenses associated with the operation of the assets contributed to us and occurring before the closing date of our IPO. OCI Company Ltd. has not agreed to indemnify us for these or any other losses. The maximum liability of our sponsor for these indemnification obligations will not exceed $10 million, which may not be sufficient to fully compensate us for such claims, losses and expenses. Moreover, our assets constitute substantially all of our sponsor's assets, and our sponsor has not agreed to maintain any cash reserve to fund any indemnification obligations under the omnibus agreement. In addition, changes in environmental laws occur frequently, and any such changes that result in more stringent and costly waste handling, storage, transport, disposal or remediation requirements could have a material adverse effect on our operations or financial position. We may not be able to recover all or any of these costs from insurance. Please read Item 1, "Business—Environmental Matters" and Item 13, "Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions, and Director Independence—Omnibus Agreement" for more information. The adoption of climate change legislation by Congress could result in increased operating costs and reduced demand for the soda ash we produce. Many nations have agreed to limit emissions of "greenhouse gases," or GHGs, pursuant to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, also known as the "Kyoto Protocol." Methane, a primary component of natural gas, and carbon dioxide, a by-product of the burning of coal, oil, natural gas and refined petroleum products, are GHGs regulated by the Kyoto Protocol. The United States signed, but did not ratify, the Kyoto Protocol. Although the United States is not participating in the Kyoto Protocol at this time, several states or geographic regions have adopted legislation and regulations to reduce emissions of GHGs. The EPA has adopted two sets of related rules, one of which purports to regulate emissions of GHGs from motor vehicles, and the other of which regulates emissions of GHGs from large stationary sources of emissions such as power plants or industrial facilities. The EPA finalized the motor vehicle rule in April 2010, and it became effective in January 2011. The EPA adopted the stationary source rule, also known as the "Tailoring Rule," in May 2010, and it became effective in January 2011. Additionally, in September 2009, the EPA issued a final rule requiring the reporting of GHG emissions from specified large GHG emission sources in the United States, including soda ash manufacturers, beginning in 2011 for emissions occurring in 2010. In addition, the EPA has continued to adopt GHG regulations of other industries, such as the March 2012 proposed GHG rule restricting future development of coal-fired power plants. As a result of this continued regulatory focus, future GHG regulations of the soda ash industry remain a possibility. In addition, the U.S. Congress has from time to time considered adopting legislation to reduce emissions of GHGs, and almost one-half of the states have already taken legal measures to reduce emissions of GHGs, primarily through the planned development of GHG emission inventories and/or regional GHG "cap and trade" programs. Although the U.S. Congress has not adopted such legislation at this time, it may do so in the future and many states continue to pursue regulations to reduce GHG emissions. Most of these cap and trade programs work by requiring major sources of emissions, such as electric power plants, or major producers of fuels, such as refineries and natural gas processing plants, to acquire and surrender emission allowances corresponding with their annual emissions of GHGs. These programs work by reducing the number of allowances available for purchase each year until the overall GHG emission reduction goal is achieved. As the number of GHG emission allowances declines each year, the cost or value of allowances is expected to escalate significantly. Restrictions on GHG emissions that may be imposed in various states could adversely affect the soda ash industry. In addition, there has been public discussion that climate change may be associated with extreme weather conditions, such as more intense hurricanes, thunderstorms, tornados and snow or ice storms, as well as rising sea levels. Another possible consequence of climate change is increased volatility in seasonal temperatures. Some studies indicate that climate change could cause some areas to experience temperatures substantially colder than their historical averages. Extreme weather conditions can interfere with our production and increase our costs, and damage resulting from extreme weather may not be fully insured. However, at this time, we are unable to determine the extent to which climate change may lead to increased storm or weather hazards affecting our operations. 33


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    Table of Contents We are subject to strict laws and regulations regarding employee and process safety, and failure to comply with these laws and regulations could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and ability to distribute cash to unitholders. We are subject to a number of federal and state laws and regulations related to safety, including the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, the Mine Safety and Health Administration, or MSHA, and comparable state statutes, the purposes of which are to protect the health and safety of workers. In addition, OSHA requires that we maintain information about hazardous materials used or produced in our operations and that we provide this information to employees, state and local governmental authorities, and local residents. Failure to comply with OSHA and MSHA requirements and related state regulations, including general industry standards, record keeping requirements and monitoring and control of occupational exposure to regulated substances, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and ability to make cash distributions if we are subjected to significant penalties, fines or compliance costs. The amount of cash we have available for distribution to holders of our units depends primarily on our cash flow and not solely on profitability, which may prevent us from making cash distributions during periods when we record net income. The amount of cash we have available for distribution depends primarily upon our cash flow, including cash flow from reserves and working capital or other borrowings, and not solely on profitability, which will be affected by non-cash items. As a result, we may pay cash distributions during periods when we record net losses for financial accounting purposes and may not pay cash distributions during periods when we record net income. Failure to maintain effective quality control systems at our mining, processing and production facilities could have a material adverse effect on our business and operations. The performance and quality of our products are critical to the success of our business. These factors depend significantly on the effectiveness of our quality control systems, which, in turn, depends on a number of factors, including the design of our quality control systems, our quality-training program and our ability to ensure that our sponsor's employees that operate our assets adhere to our quality control policies and guidelines. Any significant failure or deterioration of our quality control systems could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our inability to acquire, maintain or renew financial assurances related to the reclamation and restoration of mining property could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Mining operations are generally obligated under federal, state and local laws to restore property in accordance with regulatory standards and an approved reclamation plan after it has been mined, and generally must also maintain financial assurances, such as surety bonds, to secure such obligations. To fulfill the financial assurances requirement, the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (“WDEQ”) allows us to “self-bond,” which commits us to pay directly for reclamation costs rather than obtaining a traditional surety bond. As of December 31, 2013, the amount of our self-bond agreement with the WDEQ was $27.1 million. The Land Quality Division of the WDEQ periodically re-evaluates the amount of the bond, so the current amount is subject to increase. Our inability to secure financial assurances satisfactory to WDEQ could subject us to fines and penalties as well as the revocation of our operating permits. Such inability could result from a variety of factors, including: the State of Wyoming’s future decision to require mining operations to maintain surety bonds instead of self-bonds; continued increases in the amount of our self-bond; the lack of availability, high expense, or unreasonable terms of financial assurances; the ability of future financial assurance counterparties to require collateral; and the exercise by financial assurance counterparties of any rights to refuse to renew the financial assurance instruments. Our inability to acquire, maintain, or renew necessary financial assurances related to the reclamation and restoration of mining property could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. Federal or state regulatory agencies have the authority to order certain of our mines to be temporarily or permanently closed under certain circumstances, which could materially and adversely affect our ability to meet our customers’ demands. Federal or state regulatory agencies have the authority under certain circumstances following significant health and safety incidents, such as fatalities, to order a mine to be temporarily or permanently closed. If this occurred, we may be required to incur capital expenditures to re-open the mine. In the event that these agencies order the closing of our Green River Basin facility, our 34


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    Table of Contents soda ash sales contracts generally permit us to issue force majeure notices which suspend our obligations to deliver soda ash under these contracts. However, our customers may challenge our issuances of force majeure notices. If these challenges are successful, we may have to purchase soda ash from third-party sources, if it is available, to fulfill these obligations, incur capital expenditures to re-open the mine and/or negotiate settlements with the customers, which may include price reductions, the reduction of commitments, the extension of time for delivery or the termination of customers’ contracts. Any of these actions could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. Risks Inherent in an Investment in Us Our sponsor indirectly owns and controls our general partner, which has sole responsibility for conducting our business and managing our operations. Our general partner and its affiliates, including our sponsor, have conflicts of interest with us and our unitholders and limited duties to us and our unitholders, and they may favor their own interests to the detriment of us and our unitholders. Our sponsor indirectly owns and controls our general partner and OCI Holdings will appoint all of the directors of our general partner, who in turn will appoint all of our general partner's officers. Although our general partner has a duty to manage us in a manner that is beneficial to us and our unitholders, the executive officers and directors of our general partner have a fiduciary duty to manage our general partner in a manner beneficial to our sponsor. Therefore, conflicts of interest will arise between our sponsor or any of its affiliates, including our general partner, on the one hand, and us or any of our unitholders, on the other hand. In resolving these conflicts of interest, our general partner may favor its own interests and the interests of its affiliates over the interests of our common unitholders. These conflicts include the following situations: neither our partnership agreement nor any other agreement requires our sponsor to pursue a business strategy that favors us, and the directors and officers of our sponsor have a fiduciary duty to make these decisions in the best interests of our sponsor, which may be contrary to our interests. Our sponsor may choose to shift the focus of its investment and growth to areas not served by our assets; our general partner is allowed to take into account the interests of parties other than us, such as our sponsor, in exercising certain rights under our partnership agreement, which may effectively limit its duty to our unitholders; many of the officers and two of the directors of our general partner are also officers and/or directors of our sponsor and will owe fiduciary duties to our sponsor. The officers of our general partner that are also officers of our sponsor will devote significant time to the business of our sponsor and will be compensated by our sponsor accordingly; our partnership agreement replaces the fiduciary duties that would otherwise be owed by our general partner with contractual standards governing its duties, limits our general partner's liabilities and restricts the remedies available to our unitholders for actions that, without such limitations, might constitute breaches of fiduciary duty; except in limited circumstances, our general partner has the power and authority to conduct our business without unitholder approval; our largest customer is ANSAC, of which our affiliate, OCI Chemical, is one of three members, and the officers of our general partner periodically serve as chairman of ANSAC; our sponsor and its affiliates are not limited in its ability to compete with us and may compete directly with us for acquisition opportunities; our general partner determines the amount and timing of asset purchases and sales, borrowings, issuances of additional partnership securities and the level of reserves, each of which can affect the amount of cash that we distribute to our unitholders; our general partner determines the amount and timing of any capital expenditure and whether a capital expenditure is classified as a maintenance capital expenditure, which reduces operating surplus, or an expansion or investment capital expenditure, which does not reduce operating surplus. Our partnership agreement does not set a limit on the amount of maintenance capital expenditures that our general partner may determine to be necessary or appropriate. Please read Part II, Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Capital Expenditures" for a discussion regarding when a capital expenditure constitutes a maintenance capital expenditure or an expansion capital expenditure. This determination can affect the amount of cash that is distributed to our unitholders, which, in turn, may affect the ability of the subordinated units to convert. Please read Part II, Item 5, "Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchase of Equity Securities—Subordinated Units," for more information; 35


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    Table of Contents our general partner may cause us to borrow funds to pay cash distributions, even if the purpose or effect of the borrowing is to make a distribution on the subordinated units, to make incentive distributions or to accelerate the expiration of the subordination period; our partnership agreement permits us to classify up to $20.0 million as operating surplus, even if it is generated from asset sales, non-working capital borrowings or other sources that would otherwise constitute capital surplus. This cash may be used to fund distributions on our subordinated units or to our general partner in respect of the incentive distribution rights; our general partner determines which costs incurred by it and its affiliates are reimbursable by us; our partnership agreement does not restrict our general partner from causing us to pay our general partner or its affiliates for any services rendered to us or from entering into additional contractual arrangements with its affiliates on our behalf; our general partner intends to limit its liability regarding our contractual and other obligations; our general partner may exercise its right to call and purchase our common units if it and its affiliates own more than 80% of the common units; our general partner controls the enforcement of obligations that it and its affiliates owe to us, including our sponsor's obligations under the omnibus agreement and its commercial agreement with us; our general partner decides whether to retain separate counsel, accountants or others to perform services for us; our general partner may transfer its incentive distribution rights without unitholder approval; and our general partner may elect to cause us to issue common units to it in connection with a resetting of the target distribution levels related to our general partner's incentive distribution rights without the approval of the conflicts committee of the board of directors of our general partner or the unitholders. Any such election may result in lower distributions to the common unitholders in certain situations. We expect that we will distribute substantially all of our available cash, which could limit our ability to grow and make acquisitions. We expect that we will distribute substantially all of our available cash to our unitholders and may rely primarily upon external financing sources, including commercial bank borrowings and the issuance of debt and equity securities, to fund any acquisitions and expansion capital expenditures. If we are unable to finance growth externally, our cash distribution policy will impair our ability to grow. In addition, because we intend to distribute substantially all of our available cash, we may not grow as quickly as businesses that reinvest their cash to expand ongoing operations. Moreover, our maintenance capital expenditures do not include actual or estimated capital expenditures for replacement of our trona reserves. To the extent we issue additional units in connection with any acquisitions or expansion capital expenditures, the payment of distributions on those additional units may increase the risk that we will be unable to maintain or increase our per unit distribution level. There are no limitations in our partnership agreement or the Revolving Credit Facility on our ability to issue additional units, including units ranking senior to the common units. The incurrence of additional commercial borrowings or other debt to finance our growth strategy will increase our interest expense, which, in turn, may impact the cash that we have available to distribute to our unitholders. Our partnership agreement does not contain a requirement for us to pay distributions to our unitholders, and we do not guarantee that we will pay the minimum quarterly distribution (as defined in our partnership agreement) or any distribution on the units in any quarter. Our partnership agreement does not contain a requirement for us to pay distributions to our unitholders, and we do not guarantee that we will pay the minimum quarterly distribution or any distribution on the units in any quarter. Our partnership agreement generally may not be amended during the subordination period without the approval of our public common unitholders (excluding common units held by our general partner and its affiliates) other than in certain circumstances where no unitholder approval is required. However, our partnership agreement can be amended with the consent of our general partner and the approval of a majority of the outstanding common units (including common units held by affiliates of our general partner) after the subordination period has ended. Our partnership agreement replaces our general partner's fiduciary duties to holders of our common units with contractual standards governing its duties. Our partnership agreement contains provisions that eliminate and replace the fiduciary standards to which our general partner would otherwise be held by Delaware law regarding fiduciary duty and replace those duties with several different contractual 36


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    Table of Contents standards. For example, our partnership agreement permits our general partner to make a number of decisions in its individual capacity, as opposed to in its capacity as our general partner, free of any duties to us and our unitholders other than the implied contractual covenant of good faith and fair dealing, which means that a court will enforce the reasonable expectations of the partners where the language in the partnership agreement does not provide for a clear course of action. This provision entitles our general partner to consider only the interests and factors that it desires and relieves it of any duty or obligation to give any consideration to any interest of, or factors affecting, us, our affiliates or our limited partners. Examples of decisions that our general partner may make in its individual capacity include: how to allocate business opportunities among us and its affiliates; whether to exercise its limited call right; whether to seek approval of the resolution of a conflict of interest by the conflicts committee of the board of directors of our general partner; how to exercise its voting rights with respect to the units it owns; whether to exercise its registration rights; whether to elect to reset target distribution levels; whether to transfer the incentive distribution rights or any units it owns to a third party; and whether or not to consent to any merger, consolidation or conversion of the partnership or amendment to the partnership agreement. By purchasing a common unit, a unitholder is treated as having consented to the provisions in the partnership agreement, including the provisions discussed above. Our partnership agreement restricts the remedies available to holders of our units for actions taken by our general partner that might otherwise constitute breaches of fiduciary duty. Our partnership agreement contains provisions that restrict the remedies available to unitholders for actions taken by our general partner that might otherwise constitute breaches of fiduciary duty under Delaware law regarding fiduciary duty under state fiduciary duty law. For example, our partnership agreement provides that: whenever our general partner, the board of directors of our general partner or any committee thereof (including the conflicts committee) makes a determination or takes, or declines to take, any other action in their respective capacities, our general partner, the board of directors of our general partner and any committee thereof (including the conflicts committee), as applicable, is required to make such determination, or take or decline to take such other action, in good faith, meaning that it subjectively believed that the decision was in the best interests of our partnership, and, except as specifically provided by our partnership agreement, will not be subject to any other or different standard imposed by our partnership agreement, Delaware law, or any other law, rule or regulation, or at equity; our general partner will not have any liability to us or our unitholders for a decision made in its capacity as a general partner so long as such decisions are made in good faith; our general partner and its officers and directors will not be liable for monetary damages to us or our limited partners resulting from any act or omission unless there has been a final and non-appealable judgment entered by a court of competent jurisdiction determining that our general partner or its officers and directors, as the case may be, acted in bad faith or engaged in fraud or willful misconduct or, in the case of a criminal matter, acted with knowledge that the conduct was criminal; and our general partner will not be in breach of its obligations under the partnership agreement or its duties to us or our limited partners if a transaction with an affiliate or the resolution of a conflict of interest is: approved by the conflicts committee of the board of directors of our general partner, although our general partner is not obligated to seek such approval; approved by the vote of a majority of the outstanding common units, excluding any common units owned by our general partner and its affiliates; determined by the board of directors of our general partner to be on terms no less favorable to us than those generally being provided to or available from unrelated third parties; or 37


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    Table of Contents determined by the board of directors of our general partner to be fair and reasonable to us, taking into account the totality of the relationships among the parties involved, including other transactions that may be particularly favorable or advantageous to us. In connection with a situation involving a transaction with an affiliate or a conflict of interest, any determination by our general partner or the conflicts committee must be made in good faith. If an affiliate transaction or the resolution of a conflict of interest is not approved by our common unitholders or the conflicts committee and the board of directors of our general partner determines that the resolution or course of action taken with respect to such affiliate transaction or conflict of interest satisfies either of the standards set forth in the third and fourth bullets above, then it will be presumed that, in making its decision, the board of directors acted in good faith, and in any proceeding brought by or on behalf of any limited partner or the partnership challenging such determination, the person bringing or prosecuting such proceeding will have the burden of overcoming such presumption. Our sponsor and other affiliates of our general partner are not restricted in their ability to compete with us. Our partnership agreement provides that our general partner will be restricted from engaging in any business activities other than acting as our general partner and those activities incidental to its ownership of interests in us. Affiliates of our general partner, including our sponsor and its other subsidiaries, are not prohibited from owning assets or engaging in businesses that compete directly or indirectly with us. Our sponsor may make investments in and purchases of entities that acquire, own and operate other soda ash producing assets. Our sponsor will be under no obligation to make any acquisition opportunities available to us. Moreover, while our sponsor may offer us the opportunity to buy additional assets from it, it is under no contractual obligation to accept any offer we might make with respect to such opportunity. Pursuant to the terms of our partnership agreement, the doctrine of corporate opportunity, or any analogous doctrine, does not apply to our general partner or any of its affiliates, including its executive officers and directors and our sponsor. Any such person or entity that becomes aware of a potential transaction, agreement, arrangement or other matter that may be an opportunity for us will not have any duty to communicate or offer such opportunity to us. Any such person or entity will not be liable to us or to any limited partner for breach of any fiduciary duty or other duty by reason of the fact that such person or entity pursues or acquires such opportunity for itself, directs such opportunity to another person or entity or does not communicate such opportunity or information to us. This may create actual and potential conflicts of interest between us and affiliates of our general partner and result in less than favorable treatment of us and our common unitholders. Our general partner, or any transferee holding a majority of the incentive distribution rights, may elect to cause us to issue common units to it in connection with a resetting of the minimum quarterly distribution (as defined in our partnership agreement) and target distribution levels related to its incentive distribution rights, without the approval of the conflicts committee of our general partner or the holders of our common units. This election could result in lower distributions to holders of our common units in certain situations. The holder or holders of a majority of the incentive distribution rights, which is initially our general partner, have the right, at any time when there are no subordinated units outstanding and it has received incentive distributions at the highest level to which it is entitled (48.0%) for each of the prior four consecutive fiscal quarters (and the amount of each such distribution did not exceed adjusted operating surplus for each such quarter), to reset the minimum quarterly distribution and the initial target distribution levels at higher levels based on our cash distribution at the time of the exercise of the reset election. Following such a reset election, the minimum quarterly distribution will be reset to an amount equal to the average cash distribution per unit for the two fiscal quarters immediately preceding the reset election (such amount is referred to as the "reset minimum quarterly distribution"), and the target distribution levels will be reset to correspondingly higher levels based on percentage increases above the reset minimum quarterly distribution. Our general partner has the right to transfer the incentive distribution rights at any time, in whole or in part, and any transferee holding a majority of the incentive distribution rights will have the same rights as our general partner with respect to resetting target distributions. In the event of a reset of our minimum quarterly distribution and target distribution levels, our general partner will be entitled to receive, in the aggregate, a number of common units equal to that number of common units that would have entitled the holder of such units to an aggregate quarterly cash distribution in the two-quarter period prior to the reset election equal to the distribution to our general partner on the incentive distribution rights in the quarter prior to the reset election prior two quarters. Our general partner will also be issued the number of general partner units necessary to maintain its general partner interest in us that existed immediately prior to the reset election (currently 2.0%). We anticipate that our general partner would exercise this reset right to facilitate acquisitions or internal growth projects that would not be sufficiently accretive to cash distributions per common unit without such conversion. However, our general partner or a transferee could also exercise this reset election at a time when it is experiencing, or expects to experience, declines in the cash distributions it receives related to its incentive distribution rights and may, therefore, desire to be issued common units rather than retain the right to receive incentive distributions based on target distribution levels that are less certain in the then-current business environment. This risk could increase if our incentive distribution rights have been transferred to a third-party. As a result, a reset election may cause our common unitholders to 38


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    Table of Contents experience dilution in the amount of cash distributions that they otherwise would have received had we not issued new common units to our general partner in connection with resetting the target distribution levels. Holders of our common units have limited voting rights and are not entitled to appoint our general partner or its directors, which could reduce the price at which our common units will trade. Unlike the holders of common stock in a corporation, unitholders have only limited voting rights on matters affecting our business and, therefore, limited ability to influence management's decisions regarding our business. Unitholders will have no right on an annual or ongoing basis to appoint our general partner or its board of directors. The board of directors of our general partner, including the independent directors, is chosen entirely by OCI Holdings as a result of its ownership in our general partner and not by our unitholders. As a result of these limitations, the secondary market price at which the common units will trade could decline because of the absence or reduction of a takeover premium in the trading price. Unlike publicly traded corporations, we will not conduct annual meetings of our unitholders to appoint directors or to conduct other matters routinely conducted at annual meetings of stockholders of corporations. Our partnership agreement also contains provisions limiting the ability of unitholders to call meetings or to acquire information about our operations, as well as other provisions limiting the unitholders' ability to influence the manner or direction of management. Even if holders of our common units are dissatisfied, they cannot initially remove our general partner without its consent. If our unitholders are dissatisfied with the performance of our general partner, they will have limited ability to remove our general partner. The vote of the holders of at least 662/3% of all outstanding common and subordinated units voting together as a single class is required to remove our general partner. As of March 10, 2014, OCI Holdings owned 4,775,500 common units and 9,775,500 subordinated units, which together constitute an aggregate of 74.4% of the common units and subordinated units in us. Also, if our general partner is removed without cause during the subordination period and no units held by the holders of the subordinated units or their affiliates are voted in favor of that removal, all remaining subordinated units will automatically be converted into common units and any existing arrearages on the common units will be extinguished. Removal of our general partner under these circumstances would adversely affect our common units by prematurely eliminating their distribution and liquidation preference over our subordinated units, which would otherwise have continued until we had met certain distribution and performance tests. Cause is narrowly defined in our partnership agreement to mean that a court of competent jurisdiction has entered a final, non-appealable judgment finding our general partner liable for actual fraud or willful misconduct in its capacity as our general partner. Cause does not include most cases of charges of poor management of the business, so the removal of our general partner because of unitholder dissatisfaction with the performance of our general partner in managing our partnership will most likely result in the termination of the subordination period and conversion of all subordinated units to common units. Our general partner interest or the control of our general partner may be transferred to a third party without unitholder consent. Our general partner may transfer its general partner interest to a third party in a merger or in a sale of all or substantially all of its assets without the consent of our unitholders. Furthermore, our partnership agreement does not restrict the ability of our sponsor to transfer its ownership interest in our general partner to a third party. In such a situation, the new members of our general partner would be in a position to replace the board of directors and executive officers of our general partner with their own designees and thereby exert significant control over the decisions taken by the board of directors and executive officers of our general partner. This effectively permits a "change of control" without the vote or consent of our unitholders. The incentive distribution rights held by our general partner, or indirectly held by our sponsor, may be transferred to a third party without unitholder consent. Our general partner or our sponsor may transfer the incentive distribution rights to a third party at any time without the consent of our unitholders. If our sponsor transfers the incentive distribution rights to a third party but retains its ownership interest in our general partner, our general partner may not have the same incentive to grow our partnership and increase quarterly distributions to unitholders over time as it would if our sponsor had retained ownership of the incentive distribution rights. For example, a transfer of incentive distribution rights by our sponsor could reduce the likelihood of our sponsor accepting offers made by us to purchase assets owned by it, as it would have less of an economic incentive to grow our business, which in turn would impact our ability to grow our asset base. Our general partner has a limited call right that may require unitholders to sell their common units at an undesirable time or price. If at any time our general partner and its affiliates own more than 80% of the common units, our general partner will have the right, which it may assign to any of its affiliates or to us, but not the obligation, to acquire all, but not less than all, of the common units held by unaffiliated persons at a price equal to the greater of (1) the average of the daily closing price of the common units over the 20 trading days preceding the date three days before notice of exercise of the call right is first mailed and (2) the highest 39


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    Table of Contents per-unit price paid by our general partner or any of its affiliates for common units during the 90-day period preceding the date such notice is first mailed. We refer to this right in this Report as the limited call right. As a result, unitholders may be required to sell their common units at an undesirable time or price and may receive no return or a negative return on their investment. Unitholders may also incur a tax liability upon a sale of their units. Our general partner is not obligated to obtain a fairness opinion regarding the value of the common units to be repurchased by it upon exercise of the limited call right. There is no restriction in our partnership agreement that prevents our general partner from issuing additional common units and exercising its limited call right. If our general partner exercised its limited call right, the effect would be to take us private and, if the units were subsequently deregistered, we would no longer be subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act. As of March 10, 2014, OCI Holdings owned an aggregate of 48.9% of our common units. At the end of the subordination period, assuming no additional issuances of units (other than upon the conversion of the subordinated units), OCI Holdings will own 74.4% of our common units. We may issue additional units, including units ranking senior to common units, without unitholder approval, which would dilute existing unitholder ownership interests. Our partnership agreement does not limit the number of additional limited partner interests we may issue at any time without the approval of our unitholders. Any additional partnership interests that we issue may be senior to the common units in right of distribution, liquidation and voting. The issuance of additional common units or other equity interests of equal or senior rank will have the following effects: our existing unitholders' proportionate ownership interest in us will decrease; the amount of cash available for distribution on each unit may decrease; because a lower percentage of total outstanding units will be subordinated units, the risk that a shortfall in the payment of the minimum quarterly distribution will be borne by our common unitholders will increase; because the amount payable to holders of incentive distribution rights is based on a percentage of the total cash available for distribution, the distributions to holders of incentive distribution rights will increase even if the per unit distribution on common units remains the same; the ratio of taxable income to distributions may increase; the relative voting strength of each previously outstanding unit may be diminished; the market price of the common units may decline; the amounts available for distributions to our common unitholders may be reduced or eliminated; and the claims of the common unitholders to our assets in the event of our liquidations may be subordinated. Our general partner intends to limit its liability regarding our obligations. Our general partner intends to limit its liability under contractual arrangements so that the counterparties to such arrangements have recourse only against our assets, and not against our general partner or its assets. Our general partner may therefore cause us to incur indebtedness or other obligations that are nonrecourse to our general partner. Our partnership agreement permits our general partner to limit its liability, even if we could have obtained more favorable terms without the limitation on liability. In addition, we are obligated to reimburse or indemnify our general partner to the extent that it incurs obligations on our behalf. Any such reimbursement or indemnification payments would reduce the amount of cash otherwise available for distribution to our unitholders. Our partnership agreement restricts the voting rights of unitholders owning 20% or more of our common units. Our partnership agreement restricts unitholders' voting rights by providing that any units held by a person or group that owns 20% or more of any class of units then outstanding, other than our general partner and its affiliates, their transferees and persons who acquired such units with the prior approval of the board of directors of our general partner, cannot vote on any matter. Cost reimbursements due to our general partner and its affiliates for services provided to us or on our behalf will reduce our earnings and therefore our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. The amount and timing of such reimbursements will be determined by our general partner. Prior to making any distribution on the common units, we will reimburse our general partner and its affiliates for all expenses they incur and payments they make on our behalf. Our partnership agreement does not set a limit on the amount of expenses for which our general partner and its affiliates may be reimbursed. These expenses include salary, bonus, incentive compensation and other amounts paid to persons who perform services for us or on our behalf and expenses allocated to our general partner by its affiliates. Our partnership agreement provides that our general partner will determine in good faith the expenses that are allocable 40


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    Table of Contents to us. The reimbursement of expenses and payment of fees, if any, to our general partner and its affiliates will reduce our earnings and therefore our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. Your liability may not be limited if a court finds that unitholder action constitutes control of our business. A general partner of a partnership generally has unlimited liability for the obligations of the partnership, except for those contractual obligations of the partnership that are expressly made without recourse to the general partner. Our partnership is organized under Delaware law, and we conduct business primarily in Wyoming and Georgia. The limitations on the liability of holders of limited partner interests for the obligations of a limited partnership have not been clearly established in some jurisdictions. You could be liable for any and all of our obligations as if you were a general partner if a court or government agency were to determine that: we were conducting business in a state but had not complied with that particular state's partnership statute; or your right to act with other unitholders to remove or replace the general partner, to approve some amendments to our partnership agreement or to take other actions under our partnership agreement constitute "control" of our business. Unitholders may have liability to repay distributions and in certain circumstances may be personally liable for the obligations of the partnership. Under certain circumstances, unitholders may have to repay amounts wrongfully returned or distributed to them. Under Section 17-607 of the Delaware Revised Uniform Limited Partnership Act, we may not make a distribution to our unitholders if the distribution would cause our liabilities to exceed the fair value of our assets. Delaware law provides that, for a period of three years from the date of the impermissible distribution, limited partners who received a distribution and who knew at the time of such distribution that it violated Delaware law will be liable to the limited partnership for the distribution amount. Transferees of common units are liable both for the obligations of the transferor to make contributions to the partnership that were known to the transferee at the time of transfer and for those obligations that were unknown if the liabilities could have been determined from the partnership agreement. Liabilities to partners on account of their partnership interests and liabilities that are non-recourse to the partnership are not counted for purposes of determining whether a distribution is permitted. For as long as we are an emerging growth company, we will not be required to comply with certain reporting requirements, including those relating to accounting standards and disclosure about our executive compensation, that apply to other public companies. We are classified as an emerging growth company. The JOBS Act contains provisions that, among other things, relax certain reporting requirements for emerging growth companies, including certain requirements relating to accounting standards and compensation disclosure. For as long as we are an emerging growth company, which may be up to five full fiscal years, unlike other public companies, we will not be required to (1) provide an auditor's attestation report on management's assessment of the effectiveness of our system of internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002, (2) comply with any new requirements adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or the PCAOB, requiring mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor's report in which the auditor would be required to provide additional information about the audit and the financial statements of the issuer, (3) comply with any new audit rules adopted by the PCAOB after April 5, 2012 unless the SEC determines otherwise, (4) provide certain disclosure regarding executive compensation required of larger public companies or (5) hold unitholder advisory votes on executive compensation. We have chosen to "opt out" of the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards, and as a result, we will comply with new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies. The JOBS Act provides that our decision to opt out of the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards is irrevocable. If we fail to develop or maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud. As a result, current and potential unitholders could lose confidence in our financial reporting, which would harm our business and the trading price of our units. We are an emerging growth company and we cannot be certain if the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies will make our common units less attractive to investors. We are an emerging growth company, as defined in the JOBS Act, and we have taken advantage and may in the future take advantage of certain temporary exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not "emerging growth companies," including not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We cannot predict if investors will find our common units less attractive if we continue to rely on this exemption. If some investors find our common units less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common units, and the secondary market price of our common units may be more volatile. The New York Stock Exchange does not require a publicly-traded partnership like us to comply with certain of its corporate governance requirements. 41


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    Table of Contents Our common units are listed on the NYSE under the symbol “OCIR.” Because we are a publicly-traded partnership, the NYSE does not require us to have a majority of independent directors on our general partner’s board of directors or to establish a compensation committee or a nominating and corporate governance committee. Accordingly, unitholders do not have the same protections afforded to certain corporations that are subject to all of the NYSE corporate governance requirements. We incur increased costs as a result of being a publicly-traded partnership. We have a limited history operating as a publicly-traded partnership. As a publicly-traded partnership, we incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur prior to becoming public. In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as well as rules implemented by the SEC and the NYSE, require publicly-traded entities to adopt various corporate governance practices that further increase our costs. Before we are able to make distributions to our unitholders, we must first pay or reserve cash for our expenses, including the costs of being a publicly-traded partnership. As a result, the amount of cash we have available for distribution to our unitholders is affected by the costs associated with being a public company. The market price of our common units could be adversely affected by sales of substantial amounts of our common units in the public markets, including sales by our existing unitholders. Under our partnership agreement, we have agreed to register for resale under the Securities Act and applicable state securities laws any common units, subordinated units or other limited partner interests proposed to be sold by our general partner or any of its affiliates or their assignees if an exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act is not otherwise available. These registration rights continue for two years following any withdrawal or removal of our general partner. The sale or disposition of a substantial number of our common units in the public markets could have a material adverse effect on the price of our common units or could impair our ability to obtain capital through an offering of equity securities. We do not know whether any such sales would be made in the public market or in private placements, nor do we know what impact such potential or actual sales would have on our unit price in the future. Our unitholders who fail to furnish certain information requested by our general partner or who our general partner, upon receipt of such information, determines are not eligible citizens are not entitled to receive distributions or allocations of income or loss on their common units and their common units will be subject to redemption. Our general partner may require each limited partner to furnish information about his nationality, citizenship or related status. If a limited partner fails to furnish information about his nationality, citizenship or other related status within 30 days after a request for the information or our general partner determines after receipt of the information that the limited partner is not an eligible citizen, the limited partner may be treated as a non-citizen assignee. A non-citizen assignee does not have the right to direct the voting of his units and may not receive distributions in kind upon our liquidation. Furthermore, we have the right to redeem all of the common units and subordinated units of any holder that is not an eligible citizen or fails to furnish the requested information. The redemption price will be paid in cash or by delivery of a promissory note, as determined by our general partner. We are dependent on information technology and our systems and infrastructure face certain risks, including cybersecurity risks and data leakage risks. We are dependent on information technology systems and infrastructure. Any significant breakdown, invasion, destruction or interruption of these systems by employees, others with authorized access to our systems, or unauthorized persons could negatively impact operations. There is also a risk that we could experience a business interruption, theft of information, or reputational damage as a result of a cyber-attack, such as an infiltration of a data center, or data leakage of confidential information either internally or at our third-party providers. While we have invested in the protection of our data and information technology to reduce these risks and periodically test the security of our information systems network, there can be no assurance that our efforts will prevent breakdowns or breaches in our systems that could adversely affect our business. Tax Risks to Common Unitholders Our tax treatment depends on our status as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes, as well as our not being subject to a material amount of entity-level taxation by individual states. If the IRS were to treat us as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes or we were to become subject to material additional amounts of entity-level taxation for state tax purposes, then our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders could be substantially reduced. The anticipated after-tax economic benefit of an investment in our common units depends largely on our being treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes. 42


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    Table of Contents Despite the fact that we are organized as a limited partnership under Delaware law, it is possible in certain circumstances for a partnership such as ours to be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Although we do not believe, based upon our current operations, that we will be so treated the IRS could disagree with positions we take, or a change in our business (or a change in current law) could cause us to be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes or otherwise subject us to taxation as an entity. If we were treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we would pay U.S. federal income tax on our taxable income at the corporate tax rate, which is currently a maximum of 35%, and would likely pay state income tax at varying rates. Distributions to our unitholders would generally be taxed again as corporate distributions, which would be taxable as dividends for U.S. federal income tax purposes to the extent paid out of our current or accumulated earnings and profits as determined for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and no income, gains, losses, deductions or credits recognized by us would flow through to our unitholders. Because tax would be imposed upon us as a corporation, our after tax earnings, and therefore our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders, would be substantially reduced. Therefore, treatment of us as a corporation would result in a material reduction in the anticipated cash flow and after-tax return to the unitholders, likely causing a substantial reduction in the value of our common units. Our partnership agreement provides that if a law is enacted or existing law is modified or interpreted in a manner that subjects us to taxation as a corporation or otherwise subjects us to entity-level taxation for federal, state or local income tax purposes, the minimum quarterly distribution amount and the target distribution amounts may be adjusted to reflect the impact of that law on us. The tax treatment of publicly traded partnerships or an investment in our common units could be subject to potential legislative, judicial or administrative changes and differing interpretations, possibly on a retroactive basis. The present U.S. federal income tax treatment of publicly traded partnerships, including us, or an investment in our common units may be modified by administrative, legislative or judicial changes or differing interpretations at any time. For example, from time to time, members of Congress propose and consider substantive changes to the existing U.S. federal income tax laws that affect publicly traded partnerships. We are unable to predict whether any of these changes or other proposals will ultimately be enacted. Any modification to the U.S. federal income tax laws may be applied retroactively and could make it more difficult or impossible to meet the exception for certain publicly traded partnerships to be treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Any such changes could negatively impact the value of an investment in our common units. Unitholders are required to pay taxes on their respective shares of our income even if they do not receive any cash distributions from us. Because our unitholders are treated as partners to whom we will allocate taxable income that could be different in amount than the cash we distribute, unitholders are required to pay U.S. federal income taxes and, in some cases, state and local income taxes on their respective shares of our taxable income whether or not they receive cash distributions from us. Unitholders may not receive cash distributions from us equal to their respective shares of our taxable income or even equal to the actual tax liability that results from that income. The sale or exchange of 50% or more of our or OCI Wyoming's capital and profits interests during any twelve-month period will result in the termination of our partnership or OCI Wyoming for U.S. federal income tax purposes. We will be considered to have terminated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes if there is a sale or exchange of 50% or more of the total interests in our capital and profits within a twelve-month period. For purposes of determining whether the 50% threshold has been met, multiple sales of the same interest will be counted only once. Therefore, a transfer by our sponsor of all or a portion of its interests in us could result in a termination of us as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Our termination would, among other things, result in the closing of our taxable year for all unitholders, which would result in us filing two tax returns (and our unitholders could receive two Schedules K-1 if relief was not available, as described below) for one fiscal year and could result in a deferral of depreciation deductions allowable in computing our taxable income. In the case of a unitholder reporting on a taxable year other than the calendar year, the closing of our taxable year may also result in more than twelve months of our taxable income or loss being included in his taxable income for the year of termination. Our termination currently would not affect our classification as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes but instead, after our termination we would be treated as a new partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes. If we were treated as a new partnership, we would be required to make new tax elections and could be subject to penalties if we were unable to determine that a termination occurred. The IRS has announced a relief procedure whereby if a publicly traded partnership that has technically terminated requests and the IRS grants special relief, among other things, the partnership will be required to provide only a single Schedule K-1 to unitholders for the tax years in which the termination occurs. Similarly, any actual or deemed transfers of 50% or more of the capital of OCI Wyoming in a twelve-month period will cause a termination of OCI Wyoming, resulting in the same deferral of depreciation deductions discussed above with respect to our termination. 43


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    Table of Contents Tax gain or loss on the disposition of our common units could be more or less than expected. If our unitholders sell their common units, they will recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the amount realized and our unitholders tax basis in those common units. Because distributions in excess of their allocable share of our net taxable income result in a decrease in their tax basis in their common units, the amount, if any, of such prior excess distributions with respect to the units they sell will, in effect, become taxable income to them if they sell such units at a price greater than their tax basis in those units, even if the price they receive is less than their original cost. Furthermore, a substantial portion of the amount realized, whether or not representing gain, may be taxed as ordinary income due to potential recapture of depreciation, depletion or certain other expense deductions and certain other items. In addition, because the amount realized includes a unitholder's share of our liabilities, if they sell their units, they may incur a tax liability in excess of the amount of cash they receive from the sale. Tax-exempt entities and non-U.S. persons face unique tax issues from owning common units that may result in adverse tax consequences to them. Investments in common units by tax-exempt entities, such as employee benefit plans and individual retirement accounts, or "IRAs", and non-U.S. persons raises issues unique to them. For example, virtually all of our income allocated to organizations that are exempt from U.S. federal income tax, including IRAs and other retirement plans, will be unrelated business taxable income and will be taxable to them. Distributions to non-U.S. persons will be reduced by withholding taxes at the highest applicable effective U.S. federal tax rates, and non-U.S. persons will be required to file federal tax returns and pay tax on their shares of our taxable income. Prospective unitholders who are tax-exempt entities or non-U.S. persons should consult their tax advisor before investing in our common units. If the IRS contests the U.S. federal income tax positions we take, the market for our common units may be adversely impacted and the cost of any IRS contest will reduce our earnings and therefore our ability to distribute cash to our unitholders. The IRS may adopt positions that differ from the positions we take. It may be necessary to resort to administrative or court proceedings to sustain some or all of the positions we take. A court may not agree with some or all of the positions we take. Any contest by the IRS may materially and adversely impact the market for our common units and the price at which they trade. Our costs of any contest by the IRS will be borne indirectly by our unitholders and our general partner because the costs will reduce our earnings and therefore our ability to distribute cash. We will treat each purchaser of our common units as having the same tax benefits without regard to the actual common units purchased. The IRS may challenge this treatment, which could adversely affect the value of the common units. Because we cannot match transferors and transferees of common units, we will adopt depreciation, depletion and amortization positions that may not conform to all aspects of existing Treasury Regulations. A successful IRS challenge to those positions could adversely affect the amount of tax benefits available to our unitholders. It also could affect the timing of these tax benefits or the amount of gain from the sale of common units and could have a negative impact on the value of our common units or result in audit adjustments to a unitholder's tax returns. We prorate our items of income, gain, loss and deduction between transferors and transferees of our units based upon the ownership of our units on the first day of each month, instead of on the basis of the date a particular unit is transferred. The IRS may challenge this treatment, which could change the allocation of items of income, gain, loss and deduction among our unitholders. We generally prorate our items of income, gain, loss and deduction between transferors and transferees of our common units based upon the ownership of our common units on the first day of each month, instead of on the basis of the date a particular common unit is transferred. The use of this proration method may not be permitted under existing Treasury Regulations, and although the U.S. Treasury Department issued proposed Treasury Regulations allowing a similar monthly simplifying convention, such regulations are not final and do not specifically authorize the use of the proration method we have adopted. If the IRS were to successfully challenge our proration method, we may be required to change the allocation of items of income, gain, loss, and deduction among our unitholders. 44


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    Table of Contents A unitholder whose common units are the subject of a securities loan (e.g., a loan to a "short seller" to cover a short sale of common units) may be considered as having disposed of those common units. If so, he or she would no longer be treated for tax purposes as a partner with respect to those common units during the period of the loan and may recognize gain or loss from the disposition. Because there is no tax concept of loaning a partnership interest, a unitholder whose common units are the subject of a securities loan may be considered as having disposed of the loaned units. In that case, he or she may no longer be treated for tax purposes as a partner with respect to those common units during the period of the loan to the short seller and the unitholder may recognize gain or loss from such disposition. Moreover, during the period of the loan, any of our income, gain, loss or deduction with respect to those common units may not be reportable by the unitholder and any cash distributions received by the unitholder as to those common units could be fully taxable as ordinary income. Unitholders desiring to assure their status as partners and avoid the risk of gain recognition from a loan to a short seller should modify any applicable brokerage account agreements to prohibit their brokers from borrowing their common units. We will adopt certain valuation methodologies and monthly conventions for U.S. federal income tax purposes that may result in a shift of income, gain, loss and deduction between our general partner and our unitholders. The IRS may challenge this treatment, which could adversely affect the value of the common units. When we issue additional units or engage in certain other transactions, we will determine the fair market value of our assets and allocate any unrealized gain or loss attributable to our assets to the capital accounts of our unitholders and our general partner. Our methodology may be viewed as understating the value of our assets. In that case, there may be a shift of income, gain, loss and deduction between certain unitholders and our general partner, which may be unfavorable to such unitholders. Moreover, under our valuation methods, subsequent purchasers of common units may have a greater portion of their Internal Revenue Code Section 743 (b) adjustment allocated to our tangible assets and a lesser portion allocated to our intangible assets. The IRS may challenge our valuation methods, or our allocation of the Section 743(b) adjustment attributable to our tangible and intangible assets, and allocations of taxable income, gain, loss and deduction between our general partner and certain of our unitholders. A successful IRS challenge to these methods or allocations could adversely affect the amount of taxable income or loss being allocated to our unitholders. It also could affect the amount of taxable gain from our unitholders' sale of common units and could have a negative impact on the value of the common units or result in audit adjustments to our unitholders' tax returns without the benefit of additional deductions. Our unitholders will likely be subject to state and local taxes and return filing requirements in states where they do not live as a result of investing in our common units. In addition to U.S. federal income taxes, our unitholders may be subject to other taxes, including state and local income taxes, unincorporated business taxes and estate, inheritance or intangible taxes that are imposed by the various jurisdictions in which we conduct business or own property now or in the future, even if they do not live in any of those jurisdictions. Further, unitholders may be subject to penalties for failure to comply with those requirements. As we make acquisitions or expand our business, we may own assets or conduct business in additional states or foreign jurisdictions that impose a personal income tax. It is a unitholder's responsibility to file all U.S. federal, foreign, state and local tax returns. ITEM 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments None. ITEM 2. Properties In addition to the information provided below, information regarding our properties is included in Item 1. "Business — Our Operations,” “Leases and Licenses” and "Trona Reserves” and is incorporated by reference in this Item. Our Green River Basin facility is situated on approximately 880 acres in the Green River Basin of Wyoming. We own the surface land and its improvements in fee, which we acquired pursuant to a quitclaim deed in 1991. See Item 1A, "Risk Factors—Risks Inherent in Our Business and Industry—Defects in title or loss of any leasehold interests in our properties could limit our ability to conduct mining operations on these properties or result in significant unanticipated costs" for more information. We have operated our facility since 1996, prior to which Rhône-Poulenc was the operator. In addition, we have approximately 23,500 acres of subsurface leased/licensed mining areas. Four ponds on the property of our Green River Basin facility enable us to store the by-products from our refining process. We draw the water necessary for our refining processes from the nearby Green River. Our mining assets consist of two mining beds with five active mining faces at any one given time. The mine is served by three separate mine shafts. Our general partner leases 21,688 square feet of office space for its headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. 45


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    Table of Contents We believe that our facilities are adequate for our current and anticipated needs. Item 3. Legal Proceedings From time to time we are party to various claims and legal proceedings related to our business. We are not aware of any claims or legal proceedings material to us. However, we cannot predict the nature of any future claims or proceedings, nor the ultimate size or outcome of existing claims and legal proceedings and whether any damages resulting from them will be covered by insurance. Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures Information regarding mine safety violations and other regulatory matters required by Section 1503(a) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and Item 104 of Regulation S-K is included in Exhibit 95.1 to this Report. PART II Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities Our public common units began trading on the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") under the symbol "OCIR" on September 13, 2013. Prior to that time, there was no public market for our securities. As of December 31, 2013, OCI Holdings owned 4,775,500 common units and 9,775,500 subordinated units, which together constitute a 72.9% ownership interest in us. We issued 5,000,000 common units to the public in connection with our IPO. There are two record holders of our outstanding common units as of January 30, 2014. The following table sets forth the range of the high and low closing prices of our common units and cash distributions declared per unit for the period from September 13, 2013, the date our common units began trading, through December 31, 2013. Quarterly Cash Sales Price per Common Units Distribution Distribution Date Record Date Declared per High Low Unit (1) Quarter Ended December 31, 2013 $ 22.33 $ 18.35 $ 0.5000 2/14/2014 1/30/2014 September 30, 2013 (2) $ 18.39 $ 18.00 $ 0.0707 2/14/2014 1/30/2014 (1) There were no distributions paid to unitholders during the period from September 13, 2013, the date our common units began trading, through December 31, 2013. Distribution information is for distributions declared with respect to that quarter. For each quarter beginning with the fourth quarter 2013, the declared distributions will be paid within 45 days after the end of such quarter. (2) Sales price per common unit from September 13, 2013, the commencement date of trading. Cash distribution declared per unit of $0.5000 per quarter was prorated for the 13 days of operation from September 18, 2013, the closing date of our IPO, to September 30, 2013. Distributions of Available Cash from Operating Surplus and Capital Surplus General Our partnership agreement requires that, within 45 days after the end of each quarter, beginning with the quarter ending December 31, 2013, we distribute our available cash to unitholders of record on the applicable record date. The distribution for the quarter ended December 31, 2013 was adjusted for the number of days beginning with the completion of the IPO. Definition of Available Cash Available cash generally means, for any quarter, all cash and cash equivalents on hand at the end of that quarter: less, the amount of cash reserves established by our general partner to: provide for the proper conduct of our business (including reserves for our future capital expenditures and for anticipated future credit needs subsequent to that quarter); comply with applicable law, any of our debt instruments or other agreements; or 46


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    Table of Contents provide funds for distributions to our unitholders and to our general partner for any one or more of the next four quarters (provided that our general partner may not establish cash reserves for distributions if the effect of the establishment of such reserves will prevent us from distributing the minimum quarterly distribution on all common units and any cumulative arrearages on such common units for the current quarter); plus, if our general partner so determines, all or any portion of the cash on hand on the date of determination of available cash for the quarter, resulting from working capital borrowings made subsequent to the end of such quarter. The purpose and effect of the last bullet point above is to allow our general partner, if it so decides, to use cash received by us after the end of the quarter but on or before the date of determination of available cash for the quarter, including cash on hand from working capital borrowings made after the end of the quarter but on or before the date of determination of available cash for that quarter, to pay distributions to unitholders. Under our partnership agreement, working capital borrowings are generally borrowings that are made under a credit facility, commercial paper facility or similar financing arrangement, and in all cases are used solely for working capital purposes or to pay distributions to partners, and with the intent of the borrower to repay such borrowings within 12 months with funds other than from additional working capital borrowings. Any distributions we make will be characterized as made from "operating surplus" or "capital surplus." Distributions of available cash from operating surplus are made differently than distributions of available cash that we would make from capital surplus. Operating surplus distributions will be made to first our unitholders. If our quarterly distributions exceed the first target distribution level described below, then operating surplus distributions will also be made to the holder of our incentive distribution rights ("IDRs"). We do not anticipate that we will make any distributions from capital surplus. If we do make any capital surplus distribution, however, we will distribute such amount pro rata to all unitholders. The holder of the IDRs would generally not participate in any capital surplus distributions with respect to those rights. In determining operating surplus and capital surplus, we will only take into account our proportionate share of our interest in our consolidated subsidiaries, so long as they are not wholly owned, as well as our proportionate share of entities accounted for under the equity method. Operating Surplus We define operating surplus as: $20.0 million; plus all of our cash receipts, including amounts received by us from Enterprises under the omnibus agreement to the extent such amounts offset operating expenditures or lost revenue, and excluding cash from interim capital transactions (as defined below) and, under certain circumstances, the termination of hedge contracts; plus working capital borrowings, if any, made after the end of a period but on or before the date of determination of operating surplus for the period; plus cash distributions paid in respect of equity issued (including incremental distributions on IDRs), to finance all or a portion of replacement, improvement or expansion capital expenditures in respect of the period from such financing until the earlier to occur of (1) the date the related capital improvement commences commercial service and (2) the date that it is abandoned or disposed of; plus cash distributions paid in respect of debt or equity issued (including incremental distributions on IDRs) to pay the construction period interest on debt incurred, or to pay construction period distributions on equity issued, to finance the expansion capital expenditures referred to above, in each case, in respect of the period from such financing until the earlier to occur of (1) the date the capital asset is placed in service and (2) the date that it is abandoned or disposed of; less all of our operating expenditures (as defined below); less the amount of cash reserves or our proportionate share of cash reserves in the case of subsidiaries that are not wholly owned established by our general partner to provide funds for future operating expenditures; less all working capital borrowings not repaid within twelve months after having been incurred, or repaid within such twelve- month period with the proceeds of additional working capital borrowings; less any cash loss realized on disposition of an investment capital expenditure. We will include in operating surplus, when collected, cash receipts equal to our proportionate share of accounts receivable that are retained by Enterprises. As described above, operating surplus does not reflect actual cash on hand that is available for distribution to our unitholders and is not limited to cash generated by our operations. For example, it includes a basket of $20.0 million that will enable us, if we 47

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