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    London Plan Annual Monitoring Report London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 February 2009


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    Contents Page Executive Summary 3 Scope and Purpose 4 Overview 5 Progress against the London Plan’s Six Objectives 9 Progress on the Sub Regional Implementation Frameworks 14 Progress on Supplementary Planning Guidance, Best Practice Guidance 15 and other Mayoral Strategies Progress on Major Developments 16 Summary of Mayoral Planning Activity 17 London Development Database 20 London Planning Awards 2008 21 Update on Inter Regional Issues 21 Outer London Commission 21 Changes to the London Plan 22 Mayoral Powers 23 Looking to the Future 23 Appendix 1 Key Performance Indicators 24 Appendix 2 Contextual Indicators 64 Appendix 3 London Planning Awards 66 Appendix 4 Progress on Opportunity Areas/ 67 Areas for Intensification Appendix 5 National Regional Planning Guidance Indicators 70 Appendix 6 Mayoral Activity on Development Plans 72 Appendix 7 Affordability thresholds for social/intermediate housing 74 Appendix 8 Housing Provision in London 2007/8 Annual monitor 76 Index of Data Tables Table 1 Summary of Progress on Key Performance Indicators 5 Table 2 List of London Plan Supplementary Planning Guidance 15 Table 3 List of London Plan Best Practice Guidance 15 Table 4 List of Mayoral Strategies 16 Table 5 Planning Applications referred to the Mayor 18 Table 6 Progress with borough Core Strategy DPDs 20 Appendix 1 Table 7 Percentage of development on previously developed land (London) 24 Table 8 Percentage of development on previously developed land (by borough) 25 Table 9 Density of residential development by borough 26 Table 10 Density of Development in relation to SRQ Matrix 27 Table 11 Changes in open space due to new development 28 Table 12 Borough Progress on Open Space Audits 29 London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 1


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    Table 13 Number of housing completions by borough 30 Table 14 Housing completion trends 31 Table 15 Residential Planning Approvals 31 Table 16 Affordable Housing Out Turn 33 Table 17 Affordable Housing Delivery 34 Table 18 Borough Affordable housing completions chart 35 Table 19 Affordable housing policy by borough 36 Table 20 Life Expectancy at birth 37 Table 21 Standardised Mortality Rates (Ischaemic deaths) 37 Table 22 Workers in London 2001 38 Table 23 London Out Commuting 1990-2001 38 Table 24 London Out Commuting 2001-2007 38 Table 25 Ratio of Office planning permissions to 3 year completions 39 Table 26 Age specific unemployment rates for White and BME groups 41 Table 27 Lone parents on Income Support as % of all lone parent families 43 Table 28 Places in Day Nurseries 44 Table 29 GCSE A*- C Grade Passes 45 Table 30 Public and private transport indexes 46 Table 31 Passengers on the River Thames 47 Table 32 Cargo trade on the River Thames 48 Table 33 Employment Floorspace by PTAL zone 51 Table 34 Changes in protected habitat due to new development 52 Table 35 London’s Household waste recycling rate 1996/97 – 2007/08 53 Table 36 London waste authority household recycling rates 54 Table 37 London Municipal Waste Recycling Rates 55 Table 38 Regional Household recycling rates 55 Table 39 Total Municipal Waste in London 55 Table 40 Indicative land demand for waste management and recycling 56 Table 41 London CO2 Emissions 1990-2003 58 Table 42 Energy Produced per Annum from Renewable Sources 60 Table 43 Progress of Boroughs preparing Strategic Flood Risk Appraisals 62 Table 44 Proportion of Listed Buildings at risk in London 63 London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 2


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    Executive Summary 1. 2008 has been a year of change not just in London but globally. The credit crunch has brought about a significant change in economic outlook and forecasts for the development industry. It is important to note that many of the London Plan Key Performance Indicators reported in Appendix 1 relate to figures for the financial year 2007-8. These figures reflect the position just before the credit crunch and economic downturn really had an impact. Where possible this report shows the nature and scale of changes during the 2008-9 year. 2. Following the election in May 2008 London has a new Mayor – Boris Johnson. The change of Mayor has signalled a fresh approach to planning policy. The London Plan (consolidated with alterations since 2004) was published in February 2008 and remains the statutory strategic plan for London. The Mayor has consulted on a limited set of Alterations to the existing London Plan focused on delivering Crossrail and work has begun on a review of the London Plan with the aim of a London Assembly consultation in Spring 2009 and a full public consultation later in 2009. 3. In terms of development, there has been continued investment in housing across London during 2007-8. There is little sign in the figures for that year of the economic slow down. This may in part be due to the fact that most dwellings that were completed would already have been substantially built and therefore it would have made little sense to have halted construction. Other projects which were in the early stages of construction may well have been stopped and there is some anecdotal evidence of this; future AMRs will reflect the extent to which this has happened. A total of 29,150 net new dwellings were built, which is very similar to the previous year’s figure. However the actual number of effective new units is reduced to 28,199 due to the increase of 951 long term vacant dwellings. Therefore housing delivery is at 92% of the revised London Plan target of 30,500. 4. There has been progress on several major development schemes anticipated in the London Plan. Work has continued apace planning for the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics with the start of construction in earnest and the stadia beginning to take shape. The Westfield Shopping centre opened near Shepherds Bush. 5. Progress has continued on major transport schemes particularly with the planning for Crossrail, the construction of the East London Line and the opening of the DLR Woolwich Extension. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 3


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    Scope and Purpose 6. This is the fifth Annual Monitoring Report (AMR5). The AMR is the central component of the statutory monitoring process required to assess the effectiveness of the London Plan. It is based on the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) set out in the Chapter 6 of the London Plan but also includes additional contextual monitoring which illuminates more specific challenges for London. 7. As with previous AMRs, AMR5 assesses the overall performance of the plan relative to key issues and trends reported during 2007/8. The figures in the Appendices generally relate to the period April 2007-March 2008, although in some cases it is only previous years’ data that are available. The report draws on many data sources, but of particular importance is the London Development Database (LDD). The LDD is a “live” system of monitoring planning permissions and completions which generates good quality data for both boroughs and the GLA. Where possible a time series of data is given to help show trends. The Appendices also note that there are some areas where proxy data have had to be used. 8. Given the significant economic changes that have taken place during 2008, and the fact that most of the data relates to 2007-8, this year’s AMR also presents some partial data for 2008 to give an indication of the impacts that are being felt in London. 9. Several of the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for the London Plan were amended in the London Plan 2008, and an additional 3 indicators added increasing the number of KPIs from 25 to 28. The notable changes are the alteration of the housing target to 30,500 dwellings per annum with effect from April 2007, the addition of indicators on health, childcare and education and the tweaking of a number of sustainability related Indicators to reflect new environmental targets. 10. The scope of the Annual Monitoring Report is outlined in chapter 6B of the London Plan. In line with this, the AMR has been drafted to reflect the overall policy direction of the plan and does not attempt to measure and monitor each of its policies individually. The AMR will continue to be useful in keeping the London Plan under review and up to date. 11. This London Plan Annual Monitoring Report should not be confused with either the Mayor’s Annual Report or the State of the Environment Report: • The Mayor’s Annual Report is required by the GLA Act 1999. The latest report was published in February 2008 covering the period 2007/08 and describes the Mayor and GLA’s objectives and targets, performance in the 8th year of operation, how well the Authority has engaged with Londoners in setting these objectives and how it will review and improve its operation to deliver best value to Londoners. The report is available on the website http://www.london.gov.uk/mayor/annual_report/index.jsp • The State of the Environment Report is also required by the GLA Act 1999 and must be produced every 4 years. The first Report was published in May 2003 and in 2007 the second State of the Environment Report was published, it is available at http://www.london.gov.uk/mayor/environment/soereport.jsp and reports progress on many aspects of London’s environment. The State of Environment Report is a valuable source of detailed environmental data covering 36 specific indicators. There is some limited overlap with some of the key performance indicators detailed in Appendix 1 of this report. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 4


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    Overview 12. A simplified assessment of the plan’s performance against its 28 Key Performance Indicators (KPI) is given in Table 1 below. A fuller description of the indicators is given in Appendix 1. Table 1 Summary Progress against Key Performance Indicators + Indicator generally being met - Indicator generally failing = Indicator showing neutral trend (may be lacking data) KPI Progress Comment 1 Increasing the proportion of Slight drop in performance for development taking place on previously developed land. Maintain 96% residential development on + 2007/8 but still meets target (which was revised in London Plan 2008) previously developed land 2 Increasing the density of Positive that densities are residential development. Over 95 per cent of development to comply with the housing density location and = generally increasing but concern at the proportion that are above the density range. SRQ matrix 3 Protection of open space. Significant losses during 2007/8, No net loss of open space designated for protection in UDPs due to new development. - of 20ha on completed schemes and 78ha on approved schemes, see table 11 in Appendix 1 4 An increased supply of new homes. New build properties up but total At least 30 500 units per year. = provision reduced by an increase in vacant properties. 5 An increased supply of affordable Up on last years completions to homes. Completion of 50 per cent of new homes as affordable homes each year 2004–2016. = 10,394 net units (38%), which is below the 50% target but takes into account other policy *the Mayor has signaled his intention to objectives. change this target see para 30 5a By 2026 reducing by at least 10% New Target, highlights the gap. the gap between life expectancy at birth in Areas of Regeneration and the average in London = 5b By 2015, reducing by at least New Target, highlights the gap. 10% the gap between the age standardized death rate from coronary heart disease per 100 000 = population in Areas for Regeneration and the average in London 6 Net increase in the proportion of Only reliably reported through the London residents working in London = census. 7 Ensure that there is sufficient Target being met, current ratio is development capacity in the office market by maintaining at least 3:1 ratio of permissions:3 year starts. + 7:1 London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 5


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    8 Direction of economic and Significant progress in some population growth to follow the indicative sub-regional allocations and fulfill the priority to east London + Opportunity Areas over the past year. 9 Age specific unemployment rates Improvement in absolute terms for BME groups to be no higher than for the white population by 2016, 50 % reduction of the difference by - but gap remains. Target unlikely to be met. 2011 10 Percentage of lone parents Improvement in absolute and dependant on income support to be no higher than the UK average by 2016, 50 per cent reduction of the - comparative terms but gap remains wide. Target unlikely to be met difference by 2011. 11a An increase in the provision of New Target - Shows wide variation childcare places per 1000 under fives, particularly in Areas for Regeneration = in places but most parts of London are below the national average. 11b An improvement in the New Target – shows that there are percentage of pupils obtaining 5 or more GCSEs at grades A-C in areas for regeneration relative to the LEA = variations but in general a gap exists between regeneration areas and rest of London as a whole. 12 Use of public transport per head Target being comfortably achieved grows faster than use of the private car per head + as public transport use has grown and private transport use has reduced 13 From 2001-2011, 15 per cent Overall decline of 9% use of reduction in traffic in the congestion charging zone, zero traffic growth in inner London, and traffic growth in + private vehicles across London since 2001. outer London reduced to no more than 5 per cent. 14 A five per cent increase in Passenger services are significantly passengers and freight transported on the Blue Ribbon Network from 2001-2011 = up while freight cargo is down 15 50 per cent increase in public On target with existing and transport capacity between 2001 – 2021, with interim increases to reflect Table 6A.2. + planned investment in public transport. 16 Regular assessment of the Being done progressively as major adequacy of transport capacity to support development in opportunity and intensification areas. + development sites progress. 17 Maintain at least 50% of B1 Revised target being met development in PTAL zones 5-6 and at least 90% of B2 and B8 development in zones 0-2. + 18 No net loss of designated Sites of Significant losses in planning Importance for Nature Conservation over the plan period. - approvals of designated sites of 18ha, see table 34 in Appendix 1 London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 6


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    19 Increase in household waste Improvement in figures but recycled or composted At least 35 per cent by 2010 At least 45 per cent by 2015 - unlikely to hit 2010 target. 20 Achievement of quantified Achievement of facilities yet to be requirement for waste treatment facilities = fully tested. 21 75% (16 million tonnes) of Currently estimated at 60% and London’s waste treated or disposed of within London by 2010 - unlikely to meet 2010 target. 22 Reduce emissions to 15 per cent Revised target below 1990 levels by 2010 20% reduction by 2016 25% by 2020 = 9% reduction by 2003 gives a reasonable chance of meeting 2016 target 23 Production of 945GWh of energy Data indicates only a small from renewable sources by 2010 including at least six large wind turbines - increase on 2001 levels. Although some significant new renewables are now programmed, target is unlikely to be met. 24 No net loss of functional flood No known development on plain within referable planning applications. + floodplain although target is recognised as in need of review 25 Reduction in the proportion of Steady if slight improvements on buildings at risk as a percentage of the total number of listed buildings in London. + 2004 levels. 13. The London Plan was first published in February 2004. It was republished in 2008 as the London Plan (consolidated with alterations since 2004). The Mayor has commenced work to review the London Plan. Consultation will take place later in 2009, (see para 79) and published later during his term of office. 14. The tables contained within Appendix 1 of this report demonstrate mixed outcomes against the KPIs. The delivery of new housing continued to be significantly above historic pre-London Plan levels at 28,199, although this is 92% of the 30,500 target. Whilst new development maintained the target level of 96% on brownfield land, a number of schemes were permitted on greenfield sites that would lead to the loss of 78ha of open space including 18ha of protected habitats. Most of the social, health and education indicators, whilst showing absolute improvements, did not achieve reductions in the gap between the target groups and the population as a whole. 15. The London Plan also has a vital role in co-ordinating and securing the necessary infrastructure to support London’s growth. This infrastructure covers transport, utilities, education, health and social facilities. The Mayor is planning to step up engagement with the providers of these facilities, especially in terms of social infrastructure to ensure that their plans complement the London Plan. 16. Detailed planning and the first phases of construction have begun on the infrastructure and facilities for the London Olympics and Paralympics. Up to date progress can be checked on the Olympic Delivery Authority website http://www.london2012.com/index.php and the London London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 7


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    Development Agency Website http://www.lda.gov.uk/server/show/nav.00100h003 . Detailed planning for the Olympic Legacy has commenced, led by the London Development Agency. 17. In July 2008 the Mayor published “Planning for a Better London” http://www.london.gov.uk/mayor/publications/2008/07/plan-better-london.jsp . The document set out a range of policy suggestions and consultation questions. The responses to the consultation were broadly supportive, and are summarised in a document “Planning for a Better London Response” together with the Mayor’s proposals after considering those responses – that document is also accessible through the above weblink. 18. In terms of housing provision, this is the first year of monitoring against the revised target of 30,500. The 2007-8 monitoring figure of 28,199 dwellings represented 92% of the 30,500 target. The actual number of new dwellings constructed was 29,150, an increase of 400 over the 2006-7 figure of 28,737 and the highest figure in recent years. The overall monitoring figure was however reduced by a net increase in the number of long term vacant properties of 951. In each of the previous years there had been a net reduction in the number of vacant properties and this had boosted the figure – indeed in 2006-7 there were 2695 vacants returning to occupation. 19. Private sector house prices had a significant drop during 2008 with reports varying between 12- 20% falls in value and predictions of further falls through 2009 and an associated drastic reduction in the number of property sales. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 8


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    Progress against the London Plan’s Six Objectives Objective 1 To accommodate London’s growth within its boundaries without encroaching on open spaces. 20. The London Plan is clear that development should make the most efficient use of land, be focused on already used land and should not encroach upon parks, Green Belt, designated open spaces and other environmental assets such as rivers and canals. 21. The London Development Database figures demonstrate that of the housing development permitted in 2007/8, the vast majority, 96% of all units, were permitted on previously developed land. Data on residential completions also shows 96% of units being completed on previously developed land. Whilst this was achieving the target, it was a drop from 98% in the previous year. This was reflected in the losses of protected open space and sites of nature conservation value, both of which hit high levels this year. The majority of these losses were accounted for by the Slade Green Rail Freight depot in Bexley, which was granted permission by the Secretary of State. These figures do maintain London ahead of all other UK regions and well above the national 60% target (see Tables 7 & 8 in Appendix 1 for more detailed breakdown). 22. Densities for residential planning approvals across London increased slightly in 2007/8 to 145 dwellings/hectare. The figure for completions remained broadly similar at 121 dwellings/hectare. There appears to have been a levelling off from the considerable increases in residential densities over the past few years. As may be expected there was a general trend of lower densities in outer London boroughs and higher densities in inner and central London – see Table 9 in Appendix 1. 23. The Mayor has expressed a concern over the internal space standards of some of the new dwellings being built. This issue will be examined as part of the review of the London Plan. Objective 2 To make London a better city for people to live in. 24. The provision of an adequate supply of new homes, particularly affordable homes, is critical to the delivery of a sustainable London. The Housing Capacity Study 2004 led to the upward revision of the original London Plan homes target from 23,000 to 30,500, with effect from April 2007. This is the first year of officially measuring progress against this target, although AMR4 did compare 2006/7 performance against the new target. The delivery of 28,199 homes in 2007/8 represents 92.4% of the target 30,500. Whilst it was disappointing to miss the target, there is positive news amongst the figures. The number of newly built dwellings was actually up on the previous year, 29,150 compared to 28,737, (including both conventional dwellings and non self contained units). This represents the highest level of new homes construction in recent years and certainly since the creation of the Greater London Authority. Overall delivery was down due to an increased number of long term (i.e. more than 6 months) vacant properties. During 2007/8 an additional 951 properties became vacant. This went against the trend of recent years which has shown a steady decrease – typically around 1000 less vacant properties per year. 2006/7 was a particularly high year for vacants returning to use – with 2695. During 2009, the GLA will be working with the boroughs to determine future housing capacity in London through the Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA). 25. Looking forward it does seem clear that delivery for the year 2008/9 will be markedly down due to economic circumstances. Anecdotal evidence indicates a number of significant housing London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 9


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    developments have ceased construction and others with planning permission have not been commenced. The scale of this downturn in delivery cannot be fully reported until AMR6 but the NHBC produced national figures in January which indicate a reduction of 31% in the number of dwellings under construction, a 37% reduction in completions and a 65% reduction in the number of new starts. The NHBC analysis for London appears to show a similar picture to the national situation. 26. An examination of planning permissions provides some mixed messages. In 2007/8 there were over 80,000 dwellings approved (gross) – this is significantly up from recent years which have typical levels of 50-60,000. This may in part be due to a small number of very large schemes given outline approval, for example a total of 10,800 at Barking Riverside and several other schemes of several thousand units. A more recent indication is the number of planning approvals granted during April - September 2008. The average over recent years (2004-2007) for this period is 34,154 dwellings whereas the figure for 2008 is 23,052 dwellings, ie down by approximately one third. This of course is only a figure for planning permissions, as noted above, anecdotal evidence indicates that many developers are not taking up new planning permissions. 27. The monitoring is suggesting that in general London Plan policy is working in increasing housing provision. The economic factors are however beyond the direct control or influence of the Plan. The delivery of housing will need to remain the focus of attention in order to continue this level of provision and continue to meet the 30,500 target. 28. Of the 27,569 conventional new homes constructed 10,394 units were affordable. This is a slight increase on previous years and represents 37.7% of new build. An additional 632 affordable properties were delivered through the Home Buy scheme and 404 through the rehabilitation of properties for temporary accommodation, but these do not count towards the London Plan affordable housing delivery. An additional 1581 non self contained units were also provided, these count toward the overall housing target but are not considered in terms of determining affordable proportion. The Mayor has indicated that he intends to remove the London Plan policy of 50% affordable housing, this will be an important aspect of the review of the London Plan. The updating of the affordability thresholds for social and intermediate housing is given in Appendix 7. 29. The Homes and Communities Agency (HCA) was established in 2008 and will give added focus to affordable housing delivery. The HCA will deliver the bulk of the 50,000 affordable homes expected to be delivered in London between 2008 and 2011, a significant increase over recent years. It should be noted that this figure includes non-new build delivery such as acquisitions as well as completions of new homes. Whilst it is a little early to say, it may be that the economic downturn can actually assist with this provision as land and indeed properties becomes available for purchase and, importantly, the construction labour market has capacity available to work on such projects. 30. The GLA Act 2007 gives the Mayor responsibility for producing the London Housing Strategy. He published his Assembly draft in November 2008, see the weblink: http://www.london.gov.uk/mayor/housing/strategy/docs/strategy.pdf . The draft Strategy sets out the Mayor’s vision for housing in London, to raise aspirations and promote opportunity, improve homes and transform neighbourhoods, to maximize delivery and optimize value for money. In particular the Mayor intends to scrap the 50% affordable target and replace it with borough based targets. The Mayor also wishes to promote more family sized accommodation London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 10


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    and improve housing design in London. The Mayor will work with the Homes and Communities Agency and London Boroughs to ensure the delivery of 50,000 additional affordable homes between 2008-2011. 31. Appendix 8 of this year’s AMR contains the Housing Provision in London Annual Monitor, which prior to AMR4 was published as a separate document 32. From April 2008 the LDD system has started recording the number of dwellings meeting Lifetime Homes and Wheelchair accessible homes standards. These will be reported from AMR6 in February 2010. The figures for the period April 2008-Sept 2008 are 23,052 dwellings approved of which 6,419 are lifetime homes and 1,104 are wheelchair accessible. Objective 3 To make London a more prosperous city. 33. In common with the rest of the country, and indeed most of the rest of the developed world, London has experienced a dramatic slow down in economic growth during 2008, indeed this has turned into a reduction in the size of the economy, ie a recession. At the time of writing there is debate about the whether the recession will turn into a depression and various comparisons are being made to previous downturns. Whilst this is currently speculation, what is clear is that the decline has come about abruptly. Even in quarter 3 of 2007 AMR4 reported London’s economy growing at 4.6% compared to the national economy growing at 3.2%. 34. The London Plan must continue to promote economic growth and to plan for a better London as and when the economic outlook improves. The Mayor has made clear his intention to give a particular focus on Outer London and has set up the Outer London Commission, see para 76. Ensuring that outer London makes a full contribution to London’s economy will not only bring benefits to Outer London itself, but also offer opportunities for more varied employment in outer areas and a more dispersed and potentially more sustainable travel patterns. Objective 4 To promote social inclusion and tackle deprivation and Discrimination 35. An important aspect of the London Plan is its broad focus on issues wider than land use. The Key Performance Indicators under this objective aim to ensure that the gap between disadvantaged groups and the rest of London is narrowed. This is recognised as an extremely challenging aim. The positive news is that the indicators, such as the proportion of single parents on income support and unemployment rates amongst BME communities, are improving. The disappointing news is that the gap, ie the inequality, is continuing or even widening. This is because these rates are also improving in the baseline communities. 36. The London Plan 2008 introduced new targets to specifically report on education, childcare places and heart disease within the London Plan Areas for Regeneration. These indicators replaced the broader “floor targets” indicator that was reported on in previous AMRs. The Government still record data on the “floor targets” and are available via the following webpage http://www.fti.communities.gov.uk/fti/ . The data for measuring the new targets is not readily available on a ward by ward basis so the monitoring has used the six boroughs that contain the majority (68%) of the Areas for Regeneration (Hackney, Haringey, Islington, Newham, Southwark and Tower Hamlets). Table 20 in Appendix 1 demonstrates that in the six boroughs male life expectancy is 1.5 years less than the London average, for females the gap is 0.8 years. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 11


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    37. In terms of childcare places Islington is notable in that it is significantly above the national average, while the other 5 boroughs are considerably below the national average, with Newham having only half the national average number of places per 1000 children under 5. A comparison with 2004 shows that although the absolute number of childcare places in London has increased significantly, London has fallen further behind the England average as there has been greater increases elsewhere in the country. London as a whole has 77% of the national average number of childcare places, see Table 28 in Appendix 1 38. A similar pattern emerges in the educational attainment of students in the Regeneration areas. In most areas the achievement of 5 or more A*- C grade GCSE passes is below the borough average and in some cases there are particularly low levels of attainment. See table 29 in Appendix 1. Objective 5 To improve London’s accessibility. 39. The Mayor has reviewed priorities in transport projects. There has been a continued trend of increased use of public transport both in absolute terms and in relation to use of the private car. In particular there has been a continued fall in the number of vehicles on the London’s roads. Since 2001 there has been a drop of 9.5% in private vehicle use against a 22% increase in public transport across London. Progress on the major transport projects in London is set out below. 40. Crossrail – Following the Government’s go ahead for the project in 2007, The Crossrail Bill received Royal Assent in 2008. The delivery of Crossrail is fundamental to the delivery of the London Plan strategy of accommodating growth. It provides an increase of 10% of total London public transport capacity by providing capacity for 78 000 passengers per hour. The Mayor has consulted on an Alteration to the London Plan to deliver £200m through S106 towards the funding of this £16bn project. Site acquisition for permanent Crossrail developments and for temporary construction sites is underway. Construction work is expected to begin in 2010 and be completed in 2017. See Crossrail website for further details: http://www.crossrail.co.uk/ 41. East London Line – Construction work has continued on the first phase from Dalston Junction via a short connection at New Cross Gate to Crystal Palace and West Croydon. Important milestones include the construction of the bridge over Shoreditch High Street which was put in place early in 2008. The project is on target for completion in June 2010 with the further extension of services to Highbury and Islington to be commenced in February 2011. Phase two was given the go-ahead in January 2009 and will extend the line west to Clapham Junction via a new connection from Surrey Quays to Queens Road Peckham. The line will form part of the London Overground network and will provide the capability of inner London orbital rail travel. 42. Work has also continued on the programme of tube upgrades. In March 2008 the Piccadilly Line extension to Heathrow Terminal 5 opened. By the end of 2009, there will be a 33% increase in capacity on the Jubilee Line coupled with a 20% reduction in journey times. By 2012 there will be an additional 20% capacity on the Northern and Victoria Lines, again with reductions in journey times. Between 2014 – 2018 there will be capacity increases of up to 50% on Piccadilly, Metropolitan, Hammersmith & City, Circle and District lines with new trains incorporating air conditioning on the sub surface lines. By 2020 the Bakerloo Line will also receive a 40% increase in capacity. http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/projectsandschemes/10127.aspx London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 12


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    43. DLR extensions – The Woolwich extension was opened by the Mayor in January 2009 ahead of schedule and has already proved very popular. The extension of the DLR to Stratford International station is on course for completion in mid 2010. This scheme involves the conversion of the former North London Line branch south east of Stratford and will deliver four new stations at Star Lane, Abbey Road, Stratford High Street and Stratford International. Progress is continuing on a number of station and junction improvements on the DLR network and the enabling of 3 car operation. 44. A decision on the potential extension to Dagenham Dock has been postponed. Discussions are pending with Government on potential sources of funding for the project. 45. The Channel Tunnel Rail Link was opened on time in November 2007. The renovation and extension of St Pancras station has been very well received and all Eurostar International services now use this station. The project, including the rail infrastructure and renovation and extension of St Pancras won the 2008 Mayor’s Award for Planning Excellence at the London Planning Awards and won the Silver Jubilee Cup for 2008 at the RTPI national planning awards. The domestic services using the route to access North Kent will commence later in 2009. Services are planned to be altered during the Olympic and Paralympic Games to provide extra capacity to Stratford, this will be known as the Javelin service. 46. Thameslink– Funding for the Thameslink project was announced in summer 2007 work has begun on a number of sections. The Farringdon – Moorgate Branch has now closed and construction work has begun at Blackfriars, Farrringdon and Borough Market Viaduct. The major re-modelling of the tracks to the east of London Bridge will commence in late 2012. The scheme will be complete by 2015 but in the interim will offer 50% capacity increases prior to the 2012 Olympics. 47. East London River Crossings – The Mayor supports the principle of the need for additional river crossings east of Tower Bridge. The DLR Woolwich Extension has opened, the enhanced East London line will re-open in 2010 and Crossrail is making real progress. The Mayor was concerned at the balance of traffic and environmental impacts compared to regeneration benefits of the proposed Thames Gateway Bridge. Work on the bridge project has therefore ceased pending a review of crossing options by TfL. 48. Tram and light transit schemes – Construction work has begun on East London Transit with the project scheduled to be operational in early 2010 between Ilford and Dagenham Dock. Planning work has continued on the Greenwich Waterfront Transit scheme which is proposed to be operational from 2011 between North Greenwich and Abbey Wood. TfL are carrying out transport studies along the general routes of the West London Tram and Cross River Tram corridors. 49. Roads - The Mayor has announced his intention to remove the Western Extension to the Congestion Charge Zone. This is will be consulted on in the Mayor’s Transport Strategy during 2009. The Mayor has also commenced a trial period of allowing motorcycles in Bus Lanes from January 2009. This is expected to deliver safety improvements for motorcyclists and pedal cyclists. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 13


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    Objective 6 To make London a more attractive, well-designed and green city 50. The London Plan contains policies to ensure that London’s development is sustainable. These include promoting excellence in urban design, protection of biodiversity and open spaces, improving air quality, minimising noise and other pollution, promoting sustainable waste management and minimising the use of resources. 51. Following the Government’s announcement of the go ahead for the Thames Tideway Sewer project in March 2007, Thames Water applied for planning permission for the first phase of the project (Lee Valley – Beckton) in 2008. Following detailed discussions about impacts a planning decision is expected in Spring 2009 with an anticipated completion date of 2014. The second phase of this £2bn project (Chiswick/Hammersmith – Beckton) is undergoing detailed engineering design with a planning application expected in 2010-2011 and completion of the final project is programmed for 2020. 52. The Low Emission Zone was introduced in February 2008. It covers virtually all of London and affects commercial vehicles. Further details can be found at www.tfl.gov.uk/lezlondon . The third phase of the LEZ, which would have brought in restrictions on smaller commercial vehicles in 2010 has been suspended. The fleet of hybrid buses will increase by 56 buses from February 2009 and further to 300 by 2011, after which all new buses are expected to be hybrids. Prototype low carbon taxis will be constructed later in 2009 for use on the roads from March 2010. 53. The Mayor is preparing a Climate Change Adaptation Strategy which will be a first for a world city. It sets out to address the inevitable impacts that Climate Change will have on London and policies and actions to ensure that London can continue to successfully function. It will be published for public consultation in the spring of 2009. 54. In 2008 the Mayor launched the Help a London Park programme. 47 parks across London were selected in 5 sub regions of London. The ten parks (2 in each sub region) that receive the most votes will receive up to £400.000 for enhancements. The voting was open to the public and over 100 000 votes were cast. The winners will be announced in March 2009. http://www.london.gov.uk/parksvote/ 55. January 2009 saw the launch of the London River Restoration Action Plan, a web based tool to aid the restoration of London’s tributary rivers and work towards delivering the London Plan target of restoring 15km of river by 2016. The interactive website, managed by the national River Restoration Centre enables Londoners to suggest restoration projects in their neighbourhood. http://www.therrc.co.uk/lrap.php Progress on the Sub Regional Implementation Frameworks (SRIF) 56. The Mayor has expressed his intention to review the sub regional boundaries in the London Plan 2008. Given this and the imminent review of the London Plan, work on producing SRIFs has been cancelled. The review of the London Plan will specifically address implementation mechanisms. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 14


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    Progress on Supplementary Planning Guidance, Best Practice Guidance and other Mayoral Strategies. 57. Following the publication of the London Plan, there has been a series of Supplementary Planning Guidance (Table 2) and Best Practice Guidance (Table 3) produced to inform the implementation of strategic policy. The Mayor has also produced a number of other Strategies which cover important themes for London’s future, see Table 4 below, several of these will be reviewed or replaced to reflect the policy changes of Mayor Johnson. The consultation on Planning for a Better London revealed a concern amongst some respondents about the amount of SPG and BPG. This will be taken into account in future work programmes. Table 2 Progress of London Plan Supplementary Planning Guidance Supplementary Planning Guidance Title Consultation Final Document draft Accessible London: achieving an inclusive environment July 03 April 04 Housing Provision (inc Affordable Housing) Dec 04 Nov 05 Revised Spring 09 Late 09 Sustainable Design and Construction March 05 May 06 Revised Summer 09 2010 Land for Transport Functions May 06 March 07 View Management Framework April 05 July 07 Revised Spring 09 Winter 09/10 Planning for Equality and Diversity in London Dec 06 Oct 07 East London Green Grid Framework Nov 06, Aug 07 Feb 08 Providing for Children & Young People’s Play Oct 06 March 08 Industrial Capacity Oct 07 March 2008 Renewable Energy Summer 08 2008/9 Use of Planning Obligations in the funding of Crossrail Spring 09 Spring 10 Town Centres, Retail and Leisure Autumn 09 2011 Central Activities Zone Autumn 09 2011 Note specific months indicate definite publication dates, generic dates indicate anticipated publication dates. Table 3 Progress of London Plan Best Practice Guidance Best Practice Guidance Consultation Final Document Title draft Guide to preparing Open Space Strategies June 03 March 04 Revised Sept 08 Spring 09 Safeguarded Wharves on the River Thames Jan 05 Implementation Report Development Plan Policies for biodiversity Oct 04 Nov 05 Tomorrow’s Suburbs Feb 05 June 06 Control of dust & emission from construction/demolition Nov 06 Managing the night time economy June 06 March 07 Health issues in Planning June 06 June 07 Wheelchair Accessible Housing Sept 07 Improving Access to Nature Implementation Report Mar 07 Feb 08 London’s Foundations (Protecting Geodiversity) July 2008 Spring 09 Regional Sports Facilities Under review Note specific months indicate definite publication dates, generic dates indicate anticipated publication dates. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 15


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    Table 4 Progress of Mayoral Strategies Mayoral Strategies Final Document Title Rough Sleepers – From Street to Stability March 01 Transport – Mayor’s Transport Strategy July 01 Replacement Mayor’s Transport Strategy 2010 Economic – Success Through Diversity July 01 1st Review - Sustaining Success Jan 05 Replacement Economic Development Strategy 2010 Domestic Violence – 1 in 4 Nov 01 2nd London Domestic Violence Strategy Nov 05 Alcohol/Drugs – Alcohol and Drugs in London Jan 02 Biodiversity – Connecting with London’s Nature July 02 Air Quality – Cleaning London’s Air Sept 02 Replacement Air Quality Strategy (draft) Autumn 2009 Municipal Waste – Rethinking Rubbish in London Aug 03 Review of Municipal Waste Strategy – (draft) 2009 Childcare – Towards Affordable Good Quality Childcare For All Nov 03 Children and Young People – Making London Better for all Children Jan 04 and Young People Spatial Development – The London Plan Feb 04 Altered London Plan Feb 08 Reviewed London Plan 2011/12 Energy – Green Light to Clean Power Feb 04 Climate Change Mitigation & Energy Strategy (Draft) Autumn 2009 Ambient Noise – Sounder City March 04 Culture – London Cultural Capital April 04 Food Strategy Healthy and Sustainable Food for London May 06 London Tourism Vision May 06 Older People’s Strategy - Valuing Older People Sept 06 Annual Report & Action Plan Sept 07 Business Waste Management Strategy (draft) Under review Climate Change Adaptation Strategy Spring 2009 Water Strategy (draft) Spring 2009 Housing Strategy (draft) Spring 2009 Regular updates can be viewed on www.london.gov.uk Progress on Major Developments 58. Appendix 4 contains a summary of progress on implementing development for each of the Opportunity Areas and Areas for Intensification identified in the London Plan. In many cases development has progressed, with existing planning permissions being implemented. In some cases existing masterplans or frameworks are being re-visited in light of the London Plan policies and sites are being examined to determine if they can be used more effectively. In a minority of cases, area development frameworks are yet to begin in earnest. Some of these larger sites appear to be progressing through the planning stages much as expected despite the economic downturn. The reason for this is normally that these large and complex sites will take several years to gain planning approval and further years to be constructed, often in a series of phases. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 16


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    Therefore, there is a reasonable expectation that the development will be constructed or completed during a time of improved economic outlook. 59. An exception is the development to deliver the Olympic and Paralympic Games, see the Olympic Delivery Authority website for more details: http://www.london2012.com/en/. Here the finite timescale in which the sporting and ancillary infrastructure must be delivered has meant that progress has continued apace. 2008 has seen the emergence of the main Stadium from the ground. Construction began on the permanent lower bowl of seating in mid 2008 and recently the first phases of the 55,000 temporary, demountable upper seating sections were installed. At the Aquatics Centre the foundations and roof supports have been installed and it is on course for completion date of June 2011. The ground is being prepared for construction to start in earnest on the Velodrome. The first of the 62 separate buildings for the Olympic Village are also emerging from the ground and on course for completion. 60. Progress has continued on development in the Thames Gateway. The Minoco Wharf scheme received planning approval in 2008 for a mixed use development incorporating a marina and river passenger pier. In Barking, progress has been made on the Creative Industries Quarter Planning application and outline permission was granted for 10,800 units at Barking Riverside, albeit only a small proportion will be built in the near future. The London Thames Gateway Development Corporation has worked up proposals for the Lea River Park to connect the Olympic Park to the River Thames and has commissioned landscape architects to carry out detailed design. Summary of Mayoral Planning Activity 61. The Town and Country Planning (Mayor of London) Order 2008 came into force on 6 April 2008 and requires local planning authorities to refer strategic planning applications to the Mayor (the Order defines what is strategic). The Order requires the Mayor to provide a statement whether he considers the application to conform with the London Plan and the reasons within six weeks of receipt of the referral. The Mayor has the power to direct a borough to refuse planning permission, he does not have the power to direct a borough to grant planning permission. On certain applications, which meet criteria set out in the Order, he can direct a borough that he will become the local planning authority and determine the application himself. 62. The new Order applies to applications submitted on or after the 6 April 2008. The Town and Country Planning (Mayor of London) Order 2000 still applies to those applications submitted before the 6 April 2008. 63. Table 5 below shows that the number of strategic planning referrals in 2008 remained at a similar level to 2007, which was the highest level recorded by some margin. In some cases several decisions may be made in relation to one particular site. The reasons for this include re- submission of a planning application, duplicate planning applications, applications covering more than one borough or applications that return to the Mayor for his final decision. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 17


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    Table 5 Planning Applications Referred to the Mayor Borough 2000 - 2005 2006 2007 2008 Total 2004 City 57 15 16 20 5 113 Barking & Dagenham 33 3 4 11 8 59 Barnet 15 4 1 8 10 38 Bexley 14 7 6 8 6 41 Brent 28 3 3 3 8 45 Bromley 48 6 6 3 5 68 Camden 11 4 6 7 3 31 Croydon 40 9 6 13 9 77 Ealing 45 6 2 8 7 68 Enfield 26 6 3 4 1 40 Greenwich 39 13 12 28 13 105 Hackney 34 4 10 7 7 62 Hammersmith & Fulham 35 4 7 8 9 63 Haringey 7 6 3 4 3 23 Harrow 8 4 4 5 10 31 Havering 28 10 7 2 5 52 Hillingdon 59 13 12 15 23 122 Hounslow 28 7 7 7 11 60 Islington 16 5 5 13 5 44 Kensington & Chelsea 9 1 2 6 10 28 Kingston upon Thames 16 3 0 4 5 28 Lambeth 35 9 13 7 13 77 Lewisham 16 10 4 9 7 46 Merton 27 5 3 3 13 51 Newham 47 27 19 28 20 141 Redbridge 10 0 4 1 1 16 Richmond uponThames 19 5 3 4 6 37 Southwark 71 11 21 13 20 136 Sutton 9 2 3 7 7 28 Tower Hamlets 92 37 36 41 47 253 Waltham Forest 12 3 4 0 3 22 Wandsworth 25 9 14 11 8 67 Westminster 45 14 15 33 26 133 Totals 1004 265 261 341 334 2205 Note: shading is only to ease reading across the table Source GLA Planning Decisions Unit 64. Following the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 all local authorities are required to produce a Local Development Framework (LDF). The LDF is a portfolio of development plans comprising Core Strategies, Area Action Plans (AAPs), other Local Development Documents (LDDs) and Supplementary Planning Documents (SPDs). 65. Borough Local Development Schemes (LDS) are the local planning authority’s work plan for the production of LDDs that will collectively form the LDF for each of the boroughs. Every London borough produced an original LDS by April 2005, which set out the range of Local Development London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 18


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    Documents that would make up the boroughs’ LDF and a timescale for producing these. They have been revised at different periods since 2005. 66. In June 2008 a new power for the Mayor over borough LDSs was introduced. The GLA Act 2007 amended the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act to the effect that the Mayor may direct that amendments be made to the LDS if it is necessary to ensure that key policies of the London Plan are reflected in the LDS work programme. The Mayor may also direct a local planning authority to prepare a revision to their LDS. The Mayor has 28 days within which to issue a direction. In 2008, the Mayor approved 5 LDSs and did not direct amendments to any of them. 67. All London borough local development documents are required to be in general conformity with the London Plan in accordance with Section 24(1)(b) of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004. Boroughs are required to consult the Mayor at each statutory stage in the process of preparation of Local Development Documents. They are also required to formally request the Mayor’s opinion on general conformity at the same time as the document is submitted to the Secretary of State for examination. 68. Boroughs are also required to consult the Mayor on Supplementary Planning Documents to the extent that the council thinks he is affected by the document. The Mayor has indicated to boroughs the types of documents he wishes to be consulted on (affordable housing, transport, planning obligations, sustainable development, environmental protection and climate change, waste and planning briefs for sites which could result in referable applications). During 2008 the Mayor responded to 27 SPD consultations. 69. In order to achieve general conformity of local development documents the Mayor has worked proactively with the boroughs, commenting on and holding meetings to discuss informal drafts of documents and meetings to discuss the Mayor’s response to consultation. Appendix 6 lists all the development plan related consultations that the Mayor has responded to in 2008. 70. In 2008 the Mayor responded to 50 consultations on development plan documents. This involved fifteen issues and options documents (including eight core strategies) and fourteen preferred options consultations (including seven core strategies). GLA officers have also responded to informal drafts of documents in a number of instances. The Mayor gave an opinion of general conformity on five DPDs from five boroughs, Barnet (Mill Hill East AAP), Wandsworth, Sutton, Havering (Romford AAP) and Richmond. All of these DPDs were found not to be in general conformity with the London Plan. He also made a number of other representations based on the other tests of soundness. However ongoing negotiations before and during EIPs resulted in a number of changes to bring the documents into general conformity with the London Plan. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 19


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    Table 6 – Progress with Core Strategy Development Plan Documents Core Strategy Stage No. of Borough boroughs Core Strategy Issues and Options yet 3 Bromley to be published Croydon Kingston upon Thames Have published Core Strategy Issues 12 Barnet and Options Bexley Ealing Greenwich Haringey Harrow Hounslow Islington Newham Southwark Tower Hamlets Waltham Forest Have published Core Strategy 10 Camden Preferred Options Corporation of London Enfield Hackney Hammersmith & Fulham Hillingdon Kensington and Chelsea Lewisham Merton Westminster Core Strategy Submitted to 6 Barking and Dagenham Secretary of State Brent Lambeth Richmond upon Thames Sutton Wandsworth Core strategy adopted 2 Havering Redbridge Note:. Many boroughs are progressing other DPDs at the same time as their Core Strategy or adopted DPDs in advance of it, for example Kingston Upon Thames’s Kingston Town Centre AAP and Hounslow’s Employment DPD. London Development Database 71. The London Development Database is the key data source for monitoring planning approvals and completions in London. Data is entered by each of the 33 local planning authorities and the GLA provides a co-ordinating, consistency and quality management role. The database monitors each planning approval from approval through to completion or expiry. Its strength lies in the ability to manipulate data in order to produce various specific reports. The data can also be exported to GIS systems to give a further level of spatial analysis. 72. The London Boroughs each produce their Annual Monitoring Reports by December. In many cases borough AMRs use the same data as the London Plan AMR. However some differences in London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 20


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    the data do occur as the LDD database is a live system which is continually updated and adjusted. This year the boroughs agreed a common date in November 2008 to run the AMR reports. There are some relatively minor differences in the data used in this AMR compared to the data generated in November as some cases have been updated since then. London Planning Awards 2008 73. The Mayor, London First, the Royal Town Planning Institute and London Councils run the annual London Planning Awards to showcase good planning practice in London. 2008 was the sixth year that the Awards have been run and introduced two new categories; Design to Protect Communities and Best Built Project 5 Years On. There was a record number of entries which maintained the high standards of previous years. The list of the winners is given in Appendix 3. Entry forms for the 2009 London Planning Awards will be available around June 2009 with a deadline for submissions of around the middle of August 2009. Update on inter regional issues 74. The Advisory Forum on Regional Planning for London, the South East and the East of England (the Inter-Regional Forum) meets three times a year to consider significant cross regional issues. Nicky Gavron, Deputy Mayor, was Forum Chair for the February 2008 meeting. Following the GLA election, Richard Barnes, Deputy Mayor, was appointed Forum Chair for the June and November 2008 meetings. In 2008 the Forum looked at sub-regional approaches to growth across the three regions, environmental infrastructure to support growth, the future of regional planning, and regional aviation policy. In 2009, the South East will be chairing the Forum and providing its secretariat. 75. The London Plan (February 2008) underscores the importance of London’s links to other parts of the UK and particularly to the two adjoining regions of East of England and South East England. In Planning for a Better London (July 2008), the Mayor has called for closer working on cross regional issues. Outer London Commission 76. The Mayor has set up the Outer London Commission. The Commission’s objectives are to: • find out the extent to which Outer London has potential to contribute to the economic success of London as a whole, • identify the factors which are holding it back from making that contribution, and • make recommendations on policies and mechanisms which will enable it to do so. 77. The Commission is chaired by William McKee CBE and it had it’s inaugural meeting in February 2009. The Commission will make an interim report to the Mayor in June 2009, in time to input to the review of the London Plan. More specifically the Commission has been asked to explore how its objectives can be achieved by: • identifying the scope to ‘grow’ the Outer London economy on a sustainable basis, through encouragement of competitive, established sectors and attracting new ones, • encouraging the development a few large ‘super-hubs’ eg Stratford, Croydon, Brent Cross and the Heathrow area, together with wider rejuvenation of Outer London’s town centres and other business locations, London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 21


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    • enhancing the ‘quality of life’ in outer London in terms of the business and residential environments and examining the relationship between demographic, housing and economic growth, • fostering initiatives which make the most of Outer London’s distinct townscapes, including the potential of some locations to accommodate tall buildings, • improving infrastructure, especially the balance to be struck between different types of provision for orbital and radial movement both strategically and locally, • extending and deepening the skills base of outer London and addressing barriers to employment to meet existing and future business needs, • identifying and enhancing the linkages with other parts of London and the wider South East which will support the broader objectives, • suggesting how existing funding arrangements can be made more effective and pointing to new priorities for the future, and • suggesting how relevant institutional arrangements can be refined to meet existing and future economic needs. 78. The Commission’s Progress will be reported on its website: http://www.london.gov.uk/mayor/planning/olc/ . Changes to the London Plan 79. A further set of Alterations to the London Plan has been consulted on. The Use of Planning Obligation in the Funding of Crossrail is a very specific set of alterations aimed at raising £200m towards the funding of the £16bn Crossrail project. The Assembly/Functional Bodies consultation period finished on 6th February 2009. There will be a public consultation in Spring 2009 and an EIP will be held in Autumn 2009 leading to the publication of the final Alteration in 2010. This will be the last alteration prior to a full review of the London Plan. 80. The Mayor has set out his intention to fully review the London Plan prior to the next Mayoral election in 2012. It is the Mayor’s intention that the new London Plan will be a shorter, clearer document with more focus on Londoner’s quality of life, promoting the opportunities in Outer London and stronger links with boroughs and to the neighbouring East of England and South East Regions. Some policy areas of the Plan can be expected to remain similar, whilst others will change markedly. The Mayor has already expressed a number of areas of potential change and he will consult on a Statement of Intent for the review in Spring 2009. This will indicate the main policy directions the Mayor intends to take and the likely form and structure of the Plan. An indicative timetable is set out below: Statement of Intent (Assembly Consultation) Spring 2009 Draft London Plan for Public consultation Autumn 2009 Examination in Public Summer 2010 Publication Winter 2011/12 London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 22


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    Mayoral Powers 81. The GLA Act 2007 was published in October 2007 and gives the Mayor additional powers, principally in relation to planning, housing, health and climate change. With regard to planning, the key change is that the Mayor (from 6th April 2008) has the power to take over the role of the planning authority for strategic planning applications, ie he can determine applications positively in addition to his current power of directing refusal. 82. As stated in paragraph 32, the Mayor now has a duty to publish the London Housing Strategy. This is a powerful tool as it has a direct influence on the spending of the Homes and Communities Agency within London. The Assembly and Functional Bodies consultation took place between November 2008 - February 2009. The public consultation draft will be published in May 2009 and the Strategy is expected to be published in its final, statutory form in late 2009/early 2010. Looking to the Future 83. Future projections are more difficult this year than in previous years. Trends reported in this Report indicate that development is generally following a similar pattern to that shown in the previous AMRs. However it is becoming increasingly clear that the economic downturn, is radically changing the patterns of recent years. This means that we can expect the trends to be reported in AMR6 in February 2010 to be somewhat different, showing a significant reduction in housing and other development delivery. At present most analysts see this as a blip, albeit a difficult and painful one, in a long term trend, as opposed to a more fundamental change in the economy. 84. It will be important to remember the long term trend as planning and investment decisions will still need to be made throughout the economic downturn. The London Plan continues to provide an authoritative strategic framework in which to coordinate the spatial development of London. Furthermore, during a period when there is limited coverage of borough Development Plan Documents, the London Plan often provides the most up to date policy context for planning decisions. The review of the London Plan will ensure that the Mayor’s priorities are embedded into strategic policy and that the London Plan remains up to date and relevant to an ever changing London. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 23


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    Annual Monitoring Report Appendix 1 – Key Performance Indicators The London Plan sets out 28 Key Performance Indicators. These are intended to enable monitoring of the overall thrust of the London Plan’s suite of policies rather than to identify the impact of single policies. The Key Performance Indicators are reported below under the most relevant of the London Plan’s six objectives. Objective 1 to accommodate London’s growth within its boundaries without encroaching on open spaces Key Performance Indicator 1 Increasing the proportion of development taking place on previously developed land. Target Maintain at least 96% of new residential development to be on previously developed land. Table 7 Percentage of development on previously developed land within London Year % of development approved on % of development completed on previously previously developed land within developed land within London London By site area By no. of units By site area By no. of units 2000 89% ODPM 2001 90% ODPM 2002 90% ODPM 2003 94% ODPM - - - 2004/5 96% LDD 2005/6 95.8% LDD 2006/7 96.6% LDD 98% 95.4% 96.9% 2007/8 94.4% LDD 96.4% 93.5% 96% Sources: ODPM - all completed development London Development Database - residential planning permissions granted / completed during the financial year for which a site area could be calculated. The target changed for this indicator in the London Plan 2008 to reflect that London is already at a high level of brownfield development. Performance in 2007/8 is slightly worse than the previous year however achievement of the target has been maintained (assessed by number of units). Table 8 below gives more detailed analysis and shows that 21 boroughs achieved 100% of units on brownfield sites and a further 2 boroughs were over 99%. Of some concern are the 5 boroughs where under 80% of development was on brownfield sites. Each of those boroughs have a much better level of approvals, indicating that 2007/8 may have been an exceptional year for Greenfield development. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 24


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    Table 8 Percentage of development on previously developed land within London Borough ODPM LDD figs % figs % By site area By units 2001- 2004/ 2005/ 2006/ 2006/ 2007/ 2007/ 2004 5 6 7 7 8 8 completed approved completed approved Barking & Dagenham 80 52 86.2 47.6 99.4 79.0 90.9 Barnet 91 99.6 97.6 98.6 98.7 96.2 87.2 Bexley 82 79.9 91.8 90.7 100 75.8 100 Brent 84 91.2 91.0 98.2 95.7 100 99.1 Bromley 91 96.7 97.8 96.7 90.8 100 67.9 Camden 92 100 100 100 100 100 100 City of London 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Croydon 98 98.2 100 100 99.9 99.1 100 Ealing 81 100 93.0 100 100 100 100 Enfield 89 100 99.7 100 96.4 96.6 91.3 Greenwich 92 99.4 95.2 100 100 100 98.4 Hackney 99 100 96.9 88.7 100 100 99.9 Ham & Fulham 99 100 100 100 100 100 100 Haringey 100 99.1 100 100 98.8 100 99.9 Harrow 83 100 100 100 100 100 99.2 Havering 94 95.1 98.3 97.3 99.9 96.9 75.7 Hillingdon 90 100 80.8 100 72.7 100 92.6 Hounslow 90 99.7 80.0 100 99.9 71.7 93.0 Islington 99 100 97.5 98.2 99.7 99.2 97.2 Kensington & Chelsea 96 100 100 100 100 100 99.8 Kingston u Thames 93 96.0 100 95.8 100 100 100 Lambeth 91 100 99.6 100 100 100 99.5 Lewisham 98 100 97.6 100 99.3 93.5 100 Merton 100 99.2 100 98.9 100 100 92.6 Newham 75 99.9 98.3 100 99.6 100 100 Redbridge 96 79.6 86.5 100 90.8 63.5 100 Richmond u Thames 97 80.9 95.7 95.0 100 100 100 Southwark 96 100 99.1 100 99.8 100 100 Sutton 98 99.8 99.2 94.6 92.5 72.5 100 Tower Hamlets 97 92.8 91.9 95.1 97.8 93.6 99.6 Waltham Forest 89 100 100 95.9 99.2 100 100 Wandsworth 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 City of Westminster 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 London 93 96.0 95.8 96.9 98.0 96.0 96.4 Sources: ODPM - annual average of all development on previously developed land LDD - residential planning permissions granted on previously developed land during financial years. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 25


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    Key Performance Indicator 2 Increasing the density of residential development Target Over 95 per cent of development to comply with the housing density location and SRQ matrix Table 9 Density of Residential development by borough Borough Average density - dwellings per hectare Average Average Average 2006/7 2006/7 2007/8 2007/8 density density density Approvals Comple- Approvals Comple- 1999-2002 2001-2004 Approvals tions tions 2004/5- 2006/7 Barking & Dag 43 70 113 174 95 146 126 Barnet 43 54 94 78 55 60 103 Bexley 30 32 73 95 44 50 47 Brent 47 71 224 199 113 150 106 Bromley 28 31 42 45 54 49 53 Camden 92 77 164 200 113 100 128 City 245 960 472 525 423 1,263 558 Croydon 41 47 93 114 79 109 72 Ealing 68 63 151 123 198 113 142 Enfield 41 48 69 51 74 82 94 Greenwich 43 48 156 161 172 236 151 Hackney 88 103 228 274 274 240 189 Ham & Fulham 68 71 190 160 116 227 143 Haringey 72 84 138 136 179 137 141 Harrow 30 53 90 112 79 90 79 Havering 39 46 74 60 58 42 59 Hillingdon 37 46 60 85 48 69 55 Hounslow 53 69 117 155 121 95 118 Islington 99 93 245 321 157 293 228 Ken & Chelsea 93 120 179 170 136 164 188 Kingston u Tham39 54 82 45 86 60 103 Lambeth 82 102 181 203 141 216 162 Lewisham 55 81 148 150 109 173 128 Merton 51 65 88 64 104 94 102 Newham 64 97 241 269 163 349 300 Redbridge 30 60 111 151 126 114 97 Rich u Thames 48 58 75 83 76 60 52 Southwark 88 102 278 290 272 273 269 Sutton 43 49 71 66 60 104 53 Tower Hamlets 113 138 348 347 236 446 294 Waltham Forest 38 44 127 130 142 117 128 Wandsworth 65 93 154 154 169 151 135 Westminster 116 144 235 171 247 242 215 LONDON 59 64 - - - - - ODPM Figs LONDON 64 85 133 129 120 145 121 LDD Figs Sources: cols 2-3 ODPM, cols 4-8 LDD London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 26


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    Note: Based on all residential approvals / completions with proposed residential units for which a site area could be calculated. Density is calculated by dividing the total number of units by the total residential site area. LDD figures for 1999-2002 and 2001-2004 apply to schemes with 10 or more units. Overall densities of housing completions have remained almost the stable whilst the density of approvals has increased again; as has been a consistent trend for the past 10 years. This year we have introduced the new comparison of LDD data for the periods 1999-2002 and 2001-2004. This indicates a similar trend as the ODPM figures but on a higher baseline. AMR5 noted 3 boroughs which had seen a decline in their permitted densities. Of these only Havering has continued to show a decline, to the extent that the average approved density in Havering is now the lowest in London and the only one to be at a similar level to 10 years ago. In terms of the Key Performance Indicator 2 the London Plan is having the intended effect in encouraging more efficient use of land. Analysis of 2007/8 planning approvals shows that 40% were within the relevant density ranges. 55% were above the range and only 5% were below the range. There is less of a distinction between larger and smaller developments than in the previous year. Table 10 % of units approvals Within Financial Year Range Above range Below Range 2004/05 31% 62% 8% 2005/06 28% 65% 7% 2006/7 over 15 units 39% 58% 3% 2006/7 all units 50% 32% 18% 2007/8 over 15 units 36% 63% 2% 2007/8 all units 40% 55% 5% Source: London Development Database. Note: Figures don’t total 100% due to rounding. Key Performance Indicator 3 Protection of open space Target No net loss of open space designated for protection in UDPs due to new development. The figures shown in Table 11 below indicate that there has been a significant loss of open space due to completed development. In previous years the losses of open space have tended to be compensated for by gains delivered by that development, with a caveat that in some cases the losses were of protected open space but the gains had not received the benefit of any protection. This year however there is a 20 ha net loss. This is disappointing and reflects the number of boroughs that have completed developments which are not on brownfield land. There is a similarly worrying pattern for the planning approvals in 2007/8 with a net loss of 78ha of open space. The majority of this, 64ha is due to a single development. That development was granted on appeal and is the Slade Green Rail Freight Depot in Bexley. Given both the evidence of the completions and the potential trend with the approvals, the protection of open space is an issue that the Mayor will investigate in the review of the London Plan and will continue to monitor in future AMRs. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 27


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    Table 11 Changes in open space due to new development or change of use 2007/08 Approvals Completions Borough Existing Proposed Net loss or Existing Proposed Net loss or open open gain (ha) open open gain (ha) space space space (ha) space (ha) (ha)* (ha)* Barking & Dagenham 33.048 31.217 -1.831 2.910 0.180 -2.730 Barnet 1.250 0 -1.250 0.560 0 -0.560 Bexley 63.799 0 -63.799 3.733 0 -3.733 Brent 0.216 0.342 0.126 0 0 0 Bromley 17.386 0.910 -16.476 0 0 0 Camden 0 0 0 0 0 0 City of London 0 0 0 0 0.288 0.288 Croydon 0 0 0 0.383 1.640 1.257 Ealing 0.031 0.031 0 0 0 0 Enfield 2.315 0.397 -1.918 0.399 0 -0.399 Greenwich 8.161 10.238 2.077 0 0 0 Hackney 0.012 0 -0.012 0 0.195 0.195 Hammersmith & Fulham 0.131 0 -0.131 0 0.174 0.174 Haringey 0.140 1.783 1.643 0.400 0.400 0 Harrow 2.853 0.308 -2.545 0 0 0 Havering 3.767 0 -3.767 0.080 0 -0.080 Hillingdon 64.337 64.187 -0.150 0 0 0 Hounslow 0.163 0 -0.163 5.942 0 -5.942 Islington 1.599 1.678 0.079 0.077 0 -0.077 Kensington & Chelsea 0.140 0.190 0.050 0 0 0 Kingston upon Thames 0 0 0 0 0.030 0.030 Lambeth 0.864 1.360 0.496 0 0.048 0.048 Lewisham 0 0 0 0.676 1.300 0.624 Merton 1.155 0 -1.155 0 0 0 Newham 4.977 13.141 8.164 0 0 0 Redbridge 1.798 0 -1.798 1.794 0 -1.794 Richmond upon Thames 0 0 0 0 0 0 Southwark 0.238 1.715 1.477 0.251 0.273 0.022 Sutton 0.018 0 -0.018 8.020 0.506 -7.514 Tower Hamlets 0.156 1.997 1.841 0.743 0 -0.743 Waltham Forest 0 0 0 0 0 0 Wandsworth 0.114 0.440 0.326 0.114 0.160 0.046 Westminster 0 0.279 0.279 0 0 0 London 208.668 130.213 -78.455 26.082 5.194 -20.888 Source: London Development Database (LDD). Losses and gains of open space in planning permissions recorded on LDD. The open space typology is taken from PPG17 and excludes private residential gardens and other areas within the London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 28


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    curtilage of previously developed sites. The exceptions are outdoor sports facilities and spaces designated for conservation, which are included even though they may be within the curtilage of a developed site. *It is not known how much of the additional open space is/will be designated as protected open space. It is important to note that there is no current method of consistently reporting on the un-protected areas of open space that are affected by development. Under PPS17 boroughs are required to audit and assess their open spaces. Table 12 below sets out Borough’s progress with their open space audits as at May 2007 Table 12 Borough Progress on Open Space Audits (as at May 2007) Progress No. Borough Date Completed an Open Space 13 Barking & Dagenham 2003 Strategy Brent 2004 Camden 2006 Croydon 2005 Ealing 2003 Haringey 2006 Lambeth 2004 Lewisham 2005 Merton 2005 Richmond upon Thames 2004 Southwark 2006 Tower Hamlets 2006 Westminster 2006 Open Space Strategy 9 City under Preparation Hackney 2006 Harrow 2006 Havering 2005 Newham 2006 Redbridge Sutton 2006 Waltham Forest Wandsworth Other strategy in place 8 Barnet 2004 Bexley 1999 Bromley 1996 Enfield 2006 Greenwich 2005 Hillingdon 2002 Hounslow 2005 Kensington & Chelsea 2006 No Open Space Strategy 3 Hammersmith & Fulham Islington Kingston upon Thames London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 29


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    Objective 2 to make London a better city for people to live in Key Performance Indicator 4 An increased supply of new homes Target Completion of at least 30,500 new homes a year Table 13 Number of net housing completions by borough 2007/8 Borough Conventional Non self- Vacancies TOTAL Target Delivery contained returning (% of to use Target) Barnet 1,178 -112 -55 1,011 2,055 49% Camden 371 355 -69 657 595 110% Enfield 935 16 281 1,232 395 312% Hackney 1,570 0 -343 1,227 1,085 113% Haringey 538 0 -7 531 680 78% Islington 1,669 1,165 342 3,176 1,160 274% Westminster 757 0 -178 579 680 85% NORTH SUB-TOTAL 7,018 1,424 -29 8,413 6,650 127% Barking and Dagenham 815 0 -79 736 1,190 62% City of London 95 0 -13 82 90 91% Havering 330 0 588 918 535 172% Newham 939 0 -12 927 3,510 26% Redbridge 625 0 306 931 905 103% Tower Hamlets 2,063 380 -462 1,981 3,150 63% Waltham Forest 743 -8 237 972 665 146% NORTH-EAST SUB-TOTAL 5,610 372 565 6,547 10,045 65% Bexley 262 0 333 595 345 172% Bromley 701 0 -69 632 485 130% Greenwich 783 0 -1,270 -487 2,010 -24% Lewisham 800 0 -134 666 975 68% Southwark 1,726 0 -141 1,585 1,630 97% SOUTH-EAST SUB-TOTAL 4,272 0 -1,281 2,991 5,445 55% Croydon 1,455 12 -128 1,339 1,100 122% Kingston upon Thames 290 -8 -69 213 385 55% Lambeth 1,207 28 128 1,363 1,100 124% Merton 557 0 -249 308 370 83% Richmond upon Thames 307 2 47 356 270 132% Sutton 621 0 116 737 345 214% Wandsworth 1,028 -176 135 987 745 132% SOUTH-WEST SUB-TOTAL 5,465 -142 -20 5,303 4,315 123% Brent 791 -32 -67 692 1,120 62% Ealing 1,398 -10 -347 1,041 915 114% Hammersmith and Fulham 510 -16 -105 389 450 86% Harrow 373 0 120 493 400 123% Hillingdon 398 0 8 406 365 111% Hounslow 1,661 0 141 1,802 445 405% Kensington and Chelsea 73 -15 64 122 350 35% WEST SUB-TOTAL 5,204 -73 -186 4,945 4,045 122% TOTAL 27,569 1,581 -951 28,199 30,500 92% London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 30


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    Note : vacants are private sector dwellings vacant in excess of 6 months. In 2007/8, 28,199 net additional homes were provided; 92% of the London Plan target. The positive perspective is that a total of 29,150 net new homes were constructed. This is up from last year, which was in itself a high point for recent years. Unfortunately the total has been reduced by a net increase in the number of vacant properties of 951. In previous years there has been a net reduction in the number of vacants and this has in turn given an increase in the number of additional dwellings available. Of particular concern is the figure for Greenwich showing 1270 additional vacant properties but a small number of other boroughs are also showing significant increases in the number of vacant properties. Housing delivery was above target in West, North and South West sub regions but significantly below target in North East and South East sub regions. It is worth noting that the LDD counts units demolished as a negative upon completion of an individual planning consent, while the actual units built are counted each year during this period. The LDD system is continually updated and corrected. There have been a number of changes to the previous years totals. In general these show an increase in housing delivery over that which has been reported as a number of schemes have been missed at the time of reporting. This is estimated to be approximately 5,000 - 10,000 units in total over the past 6 years. Table 14 Housing Completion trends Year Total housing unit completions 2002 21,531 2003/4 24,608 2004/5 27,364 2005/6 28,309 2006/7 31,432 2007/8 28,199 Total 139,912 Sources: 2002 GLA Annual Housing Provision Monitor (calendar year), 2003-8 London Development Database (LDD) residential completions (financial years). Table 15 Residential planning approvals (Net no. of dwellings) 2000/1 2001/2 2002/3 2003/4 2004/5 2005/6 2006/7 2007/8 North 7,591 6,336 11,020 8,368 12,605 16,330 15,882 12,712 North East 6,128 5,418 10,113 9,138 15,724 15,006 9,575 36,001 South East 5,960 5,616 9,066 16,053 9,234 5,844 13,352 12,617 South West 6,561 7,530 8,038 7,733 8,533 8.878 12,665 10,203 West 6,317 6,124 7,304 5,011 14,549 9,499 9,016 8,909 TOTAL 33,365 31,024 45,541 46,303 60,645 55,557 60,490 80,442 Source: London Development Database (LDD). Net approvals of residential units plus student accommodation and hostel bedrooms. Differences with previously published data are due to the continuous updating of the LDD system. In 2007/8 a further 80,442 units were added to the pipeline of planning permissions. This figure is boosted this year by a number of very large schemes, including the Barking Riverside scheme of 10,800 units which are unlikely to come forward in the near future. Significantly it is likely that a large number of these permissions will not be built out in the next year due to the economic outlook. It should also be noted that as well as some planning permissions not being built out, others are subsequently renewed or altered making this figure artificially high and not directly transferable into the number of London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 31


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    dwellings that are completed. At the end of March 2008 there were 61,156 dwellings under construction and 111,485 not yet started. Lifetime Homes and Wheelchair Accessible Homes From April 2008 the LDD system has started recording the number of planning approvals meeting Lifetime Homes and Wheelchair accessible home standards. These will be reported from AMR6 in February 2010. The figures for the period April 2008-Sept 2008 are 23,052 dwellings approved of which 6,419 are lifetime homes and 1,104 are wheelchair accessible. Key Performance Indicator 5 An increased supply of affordable homes Target Completion of 50 per cent of new homes as affordable homes each year 2004–2016. 2007/8 delivery of affordable housing has increased to 10,394 homes or 38% of all conventional completions. Table 16 shows individual borough performance in delivery of affordable housing. There are differences when comparing previous years figures in previous Annual Monitoring Reports, as the LDD system is continually updated. In addition to affordable housing delivery through conventional completions an increased supply of affordable homes is being delivered by the activities of housing associations in purchase and rehabilitation of existing properties totaling 632 Open Market Homebuy and 404 rehabilitated temporary social dwellings (Table 17). While these are not counted towards the London Plan target they are important in delivering the Mayor’s Housing Strategy. While there are still a range of affordable housing target figures most boroughs now reflect the strategic 50% target for affordable housing provision. A number of boroughs use the London Plan policy, which forms part of the development plan, if their own UDP policies were not saved beyond September 2007. The Mayor has stated his intention to review the 50% target as part of the review of the London Plan. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 32


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    Table 16 Affordable Housing Out-turn (three year totals) Total net affordable conventional Affordable as % of total net Borough completions conventional completions (all tenures) 3-year 3-year 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 total 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 total Barnet 224 27 185 436 23% 7% 16% 17% Camden 81 228 75 384 13% 46% 20% 25% Enfield -459 225 444 210 -214% 32% 47% 11% Hackney 14 468 725 1,207 2% 42% 46% 34% Haringey 265 312 211 788 46% 35% 39% 39% Islington 232 591 907 1,730 28% 33% 54% 41% Westminster 66 23 374 463 6% 4% 49% 19% North Total 423 1,874 2,921 5,218 8% 31% 42% 29% Barking & Dagenham 77 135 215 427 21% 33% 26% 27% City of London 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0% 0% Havering 70 178 108 356 19% 21% 33% 23% Newham 274 263 378 915 30% 36% 40% 35% Redbridge 114 310 70 494 15% 30% 11% 21% Tower Hamlets 812 823 620 2,255 34% 34% 30% 33% Waltham Forest 84 229 234 547 16% 33% 31% 28% North East Total 1,431 1,938 1,625 4,994 27% 31% 29% 29% Bexley 35 115 127 277 25% 48% 48% 43% Bromley 106 142 267 515 16% 16% 38% 23% Greenwich 325 516 278 1,119 18% 43% 36% 29% Lewisham 275 -81 229 423 36% -22% 29% 22% Southwark 63 680 995 1,738 5% 36% 58% 36% South East Total 804 1,372 1,896 4,072 18% 30% 44% 30% Croydon 221 471 625 1,317 33% 46% 43% 42% Kingston u Thames 22 54 102 178 6% 17% 35% 18% Lambeth 258 233 339 830 22% 21% 28% 24% Merton 89 145 161 395 13% 36% 29% 24% Richmond u Thames 247 39 105 391 28% 16% 34% 27% Sutton 97 -118 188 167 34% -43% 30% 14% Wandsworth 135 240 307 682 12% 17% 30% 19% South West Total 1,069 1,064 1,827 3,960 21% 22% 33% 26% Brent 1,033 637 451 2,121 74% 69% 57% 68% Ealing 206 620 412 1,238 25% 46% 29% 35% Hammersmith & Fulham 397 458 237 1,092 64% 74% 46% 62% Harrow 160 152 116 428 28% 25% 31% 27% Hillingdon 212 46 117 375 43% 24% 29% 35% Hounslow 125 604 792 1,521 24% 43% 48% 42% Kensington and Chelsea 65 64 0 129 32% 40% 0% 29% West Total 2,198 2,581 2,125 6,904 48% 49% 41% 46% London 5,925 8,829 10,394 25,148 24% 33% 38% 32% Source: LDD - Note that previous AMRs used figures from Housing Corporation for the years up to 2005/6. These have been replaced with LDD figures, this has resulted in some significant shifts in annual totals. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 33


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    Table 17 2007/8 Affordable Housing Delivery New Affordable Housing Stock Borough Existing Properties Other Affordable Net New-Build (Conventional Supply) (purchase/rehab) Housing Tempor ary Open Social Market Housing Social Intermediate TOTAL Social Intermediate TOTAL Homebuy (rehab) Barnet 91 94 185 29 0 29 21 4 Camden 29 46 75 21 0 21 26 3 Enfield 305 139 444 53 0 53 19 21 Hackney 267 458 725 44 9 53 26 8 Haringey 106 105 211 65 0 65 24 15 Islington 366 541 907 17 3 20 23 0 Westminster 353 21 374 63 3 66 26 0 North Total 1,517 1,404 2,921 292 15 307 165 51 Barking & Dagenham 99 116 215 47 23 70 10 0 City of London 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 Havering 83 25 108 40 29 69 8 0 Newham 119 259 378 611 10 621 17 0 Redbridge 18 52 70 70 11 81 13 11 Tower Hamlets 526 94 620 28 5 33 26 0 Waltham Forest 137 97 234 18 3 21 28 17 North East Total 982 643 1,625 814 81 895 114 28 Bexley 90 37 127 57 49 106 13 0 Bromley 127 140 267 42 0 42 20 1 Greenwich 109 169 278 72 125 197 21 60 Lewisham* 101 128 229 14 2 16 22 65 Southwark 437 558 995 8 0 8 34 87 South East Total 864 1,032 1,896 193 176 369 110 213 Croydon 355 270 625 34 0 34 21 27 Kingston u Thames 73 29 102 43 25 68 8 0 Lambeth 163 176 339 51 19 70 21 34 Merton 56 105 161 6 0 6 12 0 Richmond u Thames 70 35 105 0 0 0 9 0 Sutton* 178 10 188 19 0 19 15 50 Wandsworth 22 285 307 0 30 30 28 0 South West Total 917 910 1,827 153 74 227 114 111 Brent 384 67 451 10 0 10 22 1 Ealing 288 124 412 20 0 20 22 0 Hammersmith & Fulham 40 197 237 0 0 0 13 0 Harrow 41 75 116 0 0 0 19 0 Hillingdon 61 56 117 53 0 53 23 0 Hounslow 219 573 792 10 0 10 19 0 Kensington & Chelsea 0 0 0 1 0 1 11 0 West Total 1,033 1,092 2,125 94 0 94 129 1 London Total 5,313 5,081 10,394 1,546 346 1,892 632 404 London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 34


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    Sources: Conventional Completions from London Development Database, existing properties and other affordable housing information from Housing Corporation. ‘Existing Properties’ refers to purchases of existing homes by housing associations, funded by the Housing Corporation. It includes a small number of units already owned by housing associations but being funded for repairs. Table 18 Borough Affordable Housing Completions (2004/5-2007/8 average) Table 18 Borough Affordable Houisng Completions (2005/6 - 2007/8 average) 80% 70% 3-year average 60% London-wide average 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Havering Lambeth Hackney Hammersmith and Fulham Barking a nd Dagenham Bexley Bromley Tower Hamlets Richmond upon Thames Harrow Hounslow Camden Enfield Islington Greenwich Merton Wandsworth City of London Redbridge Croydon Sutton Ealing Kensington and Chelsea Waltham Forest Barnet Haringey Newham Lewisham Southwark Brent Kingston upon Thames Westminster Hillingdon London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 35


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    Table 19 Affordable housing policy by borough Borough Borough Policy Target Borough policy target Out-turn 2005/6 to (or practice) as at as August 2008 2007/8 2002 Barking & Dagenham 25% LP* 27% Barnet 30% 50% 17% Bexley 25% 35% 43% Brent 30-50% 50% 68% Bromley 20% 35% 23% Camden 50% proposed 50% 25% City None LP* 0% Croydon 40% 40% (50% large sites) 42% Ealing 50% 50% 35% Enfield 25% LP* 11% Greenwich 35% 35% minimum (50% on 29% greenfield or readily developable former employment sites) Hackney 25% 50% 34% Hammersmith & Fulham 65% proposed 40% 62% Haringey 30% 50% 39% Harrow 30% LP* 27% Havering None 50% 23% Hillingdon 25% LP* 35% Hounslow 50% LP* 42% Islington 25% 50% (interim guidance note) 41% Kensington & Chelsea 33% LP* 29% Kingston upon Thames 50% 30%-50% 18% Lambeth 35-50% 40% (50% with grant) 24% Lewisham 30% 35% 22% Merton 30% LP* 24% Newham 25% LP* 35% Redbridge 25% 50% 21% Richmond upon Thames 40% 40% 27% Southwark 25% 35% (40% central) 36% Sutton 25% LP* 14% Tower Hamlets 25-33% 50% 33% Waltham Forest 40% 50% 28% Wandsworth None 50% 19% Westminster 50% (30% in CAZ) 19% London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 36


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    Key Performance Indicator 5a Reducing Health Inequalities Target By 2026, reducing by at least 10% the gap between life expectancy at birth in Areas for Regeneration and the average in London. This is a new indicator as a result of the London Plan 2008. It is now realized that the data to support this indicator are not directly available. This indicator will therefore be reviewed as part of the review of the London Plan. For this AMR however, proxy data has been used. The proxy data takes ONS annual life expectancy for males and females on a borough by borough basis. The regeneration wards have been approximated by weighting the borough life expectancies by the populations resident in regeneration wards in each borough. This means that the resulting indicators are strongly influenced by the life expectancies in the six boroughs with the highest populations in regeneration wards namely, Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets, Islington, Southwark and Haringey. These six boroughs account for 68% of the population within regeneration wards. It is recognized that this approach will under- estimate the gap as the regeneration wards are generally expected to demonstrate lower life expectancy. Table 20 Life expectancy at Birth (2005-2007) Males Females 6 borough Average 76.39 81.58 London Average 77.86 82.38 Gap 1.47 Years 0.8 Years Key Performance Indicator 5b Reducing Health Inequalities Target By 2015, reducing by at least 10% the gap between the age standardized death rate from coronary heart disease per 100 000 population in Areas for Regeneration and the average in London. This is a new indicator as a result of the London Plan 2008. It is now realized that the data to support this indicator is not directly available. This indicator will therefore be reviewed as part of the review of the London Plan. For this AMR however, the indicator has been altered to show the Standardised Mortality Ratio (SMR) - using Ischaemic deaths in London by age and gender as the basis of the calculation. The SMR compares actual total deaths to deaths expected if the death rates in the standard population (in this case London) apply to the population of the regeneration areas (disaggregated by 5- year age groups and gender). SMR is expressed as a percentage of the expected deaths. The figures used for death rates relate to 2006 – the latest year for which information is available and the population is the GLA 2007 Round PLP Low populations for 2006. Table 21 Standardised Mortality Rates (Ischaemic deaths) SMR (rate per 100,000 population) Regeneration Areas Male 126 Regeneration Areas Female 107 Regeneration Areas Male & Female 118 London Male and Female 100 London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 37


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    Objective 3 to make London a more prosperous city Key Performance Indicator 6 Increasing sustainability and social inclusion by increasing the proportion of London residents working in jobs in London over the plan period. Target Net increase in the proportion of London residents working in London. Comprehensive statistics relating to this target are available through the census and are given in the table below. This data is only collected every 10 years. It shows a small percentage increase in the proportion of London workers who live within London against absolute net increases in those working both within and outside London. The information presented here is the same as AMR4 in Febraury 2008 as there has been no updated data since then. Table 22 Workers in London 2001 Total workers Living in Living outside % of workers London London living in London 1991 3,349,350 2, 676,620 672,730 79.9% 2001 3,805,655 3,083,116 722,539 81% Table 23 Londoners Out-commuting 1991-2001 Workers out % change in commuting out commuting 1991 149,820 - 2001 236,018 57.5% increase Source: 1991, 2001 Census Table 24 Londoners Out-commuting 2001-2007 Workers out Yearly % commuting change in out commuting 2000 257 000 - 2001 254 000 -1.5% 2002 264 000 +4.0% 2003 285 000 +8.0% 2004 275 000 -3.6% 2005 281 000 +2.5% 2006 331 000 +17.5% 2007 321,000 -3.0% Total change 2000-2007 +24.7 Source: Labour Force Survey - note this data is based on a sample survey rather than full census survey. (see London Travel Report 2007 table 7.2.2) Key Performance Indicator 7 Ensure that there is sufficient development capacity in the office market. Target Stock of office planning permissions to be at least three times the average rate of starts over the previous three years. The ratio of permissions to average three years starts at end 2008 was 7:1. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 38


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    The ratio has increased from 4.8:1 at end 2007, indicating that central London’s office development capacity is increasing. This is not unusual when the development cycle enters a downturn phase. Construction starts turn down sharply but developers continue to work up planning permissions on prospective sites. Table 25 Ratio of planning permissions to three year average starts Ratio of planning permissions Year to three year average starts 2003 6.4:1 2004 12:1 2005 8:1 2006 8.4:1 2007 4.8:1 2008 7:1 Source: EGi London Offices, Ramidus Consulting, Chippendale Consulting & Research, 2009 The volume of starts in central London in 2008, at 0.44 million sq metres net in 72 schemes, was 50% of the level achieved in 2007. It was the lowest since the three year downturn in office construction 2002- 2004. Office starts and year-end permissions, 1985-2008 6 5 m sq m net 4 3 2 1 0 1985 1986 1990 1991 1992 1996 2001 2002 2006 2007 2008 1987 1988 1989 1993 1994 1995 1997 1998 1999 2000 2003 2004 2005 Starts Permissions @ Year End Source: EGi London Offices, Ramidus Consulting, Chippendale Consulting & Research, 2009 Of the 72 starts in 2008, 51% of schemes with 48% of floorspace (213,000 sq metres net) were in the City sub-market. The largest was The Heron Tower, Bishopsgate, EC2, a speculative development close to Liverpool Street station. 33% of schemes and 36% of floorspace were located in the West End (including Paddington) with major starts at Merchant Square, Paddington, W2, The Quadrant, Regent Street, W1, and Park House, Park Street, Mayfair, W1. Changing economic circumstances have had a threefold impact on the London commercial office market. First, by the end of 2008 capital values in central London had fallen 38% from their summer 2007 peak, with the rest of London not faring much better with a fall of 33% (IPD). Secondly, the London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 39


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    investment and development markets, which were highly-leveraged (debt-driven) during the 2005-2007 boom, were increasingly starved of funds. Third, the occupational market began to contract, initially in the first half of 2008 in sectors immediately affected by the credit squeeze (banking, financial services and property), and in the second half of 2008 in a wider range of sectors as the UK-wide recession developed. AMR6 will test current expectations that 2009 may be a recessionary year for central London offices, characterised by negative net absorption (a decline in the occupied office stock); a double-digit availability rate (the proportion of stock that is available for letting) and falling rents. Starts in 2009 are expected to be low. Key Performance Indicator 8 Direction of economic and population growth to follow the indicative sub-regional allocations and fulfill the priority to east London Target Development in Opportunity Areas and Areas for Intensification for each sub-region measured against the Chapter 5 indicative figures in the London Plan. Significant progress has been made in progressing development at several of the London Plan Opportunity Areas. Construction work has begun at Kings Cross and continued apace in connection with the Olympics. There has been consultation on Action Area Plans in the Upper Lee Valley and outline planning permission is being sought for Brent Cross/Cricklewood. A summary of progress on each Opportunity Area and Area for Intensification is given in Appendix 4. Objective 4 to promote social inclusion and tackle deprivation and discrimination Key Performance Indicator 9 Increased employment opportunities for those suffering from disadvantage in the employment market Target Age specific unemployment rates for black and minority ethnic groups to be no higher than for the white population by 2016, 50 per cent reduction of the difference by 2011. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 40


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    Age specific unemployment[1] rates for White and BAME Table 26 groups, Greater London, 2007 All persons White groups BAME groups Ratio Unemp- Unemp- Unemp- BAME loyed Rate (%) loyed Rate (%) loyed Rate (%) /White All working age 261,000 6.9 122,000 4.8 138,000 11.3 2.4 Age 16-24 94,000 18.4 46,000 14.1 48,000 26.1 1.9 Age 25-44 116,000 5.3 48,000 3.3 68,000 9.0 2.7 Age 45-59/64 50,000 4.8 28,000 3.6 23,000 7.9 2.2 Source: Annual Population Survey 2007 Notes: The APS is a sample survey, so all estimates are subject to a degree of sampling variability. Londoners from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) groups are more than twice as likely as those from White groups to be unemployed. The gap in rates persists within different age groups and data are not significantly different to rates in previous AMRs. The pattern of previous years generally continued this year. Overall unemployment rates amongst both BAME and white groups reduced. There was a very slight reduction in the overall ratio from 2.5 to 2.4. However, more significantly the absolute number and proportion of 16-24 year old BAME unemployed people rose. Analysis of longer term trend data (1985-2007) suggests the gap in unemployment rates between White and BAME groups has persisted over time despite falls in the general level of unemployment. As the data are estimates, and subject to a considerable degree of sampling variability, it is difficult to come to firm conclusions about progress in the short term. Data will need to be monitored in the longer term in order to assess progress on this challenging indicator. While data presented here relate to aggregations of minority ethnic groups, it is fully recognised that within the BAME population there is huge variation in unemployment rates. 2001 Census data shows that rates ranged from 5.9 per cent for Indian Londoners up to 20.5 per cent among Bangladeshi Londoners. Rates were also high for Black Londoners (12.3-17.6 per cent). London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 41


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    Unemployment rates by ethnicity, Greater London 1985-2005 Unemployment rate ILO unemployment rate (white groups) Ratio of rates (%)* ILO unemployment rate (BAME groups) BME:WHITE Ratio BAME:White rate (3 year moving average) 25 3 2.5 20 2 15 1.5 10 1 5 0.5 0 0 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Source: Office for National Statistics, Labour Force Survey & Annual Population Survey 1985-2002 is working age, 2003-2007 is 16+ London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 42


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    Key Performance Indicator 10 Increased employment opportunities for those suffering from disadvantage in the employment market Target Percentage of lone parents dependant on income support to be no higher than the UK average by 2016, 50 per cent reduction of the difference by 2011. Table 27 Lone parents on Income Support as % of all lone parent families Greater London Great Britain Difference in Lone parents As % Lone parents percentage families of lone parent Families As % of lone points (London- Quarter on IS families on IS parent families GB) May 2001 168,400 59.2 900,320 50.8 8.5 May 2002 166,840 57.4 870,850 47.7 9.7 May 2003 166,630 56.1 855,710 45.7 10.3 May 2004 165,120 54.4 823,180 43.4 11.0 May 2005 163,620 52.4 789,270 40.8 11.6 May 2006 162,770 50.8 774,780 39.3 11.4 May 2007 160,450 49.0 765,530 38.4 10.6 May 2008 152,520 45.7 738,580 36.6 9.1 Sources: GLA calculations (from NOMIS with denominators based on CLG, GLA and GROS household projections of all lone parent families) based on data from Department of Work and Pensions; (Department of) Communities & Local Government and the General Register Office for Scotland. Note in AMR4 the table was wrongly calculated leading to some double counting of lone parents. Lone parent families in London are more likely to be dependant on Income Support relative to the national average. Since 2001, the proportion of lone parent families on Income Support has reduced in both London and GB (note GB has been used as there are not comparable data for the UK), but the gap between the two has remained wide. The year to May 2008 saw a significant reduction in that gap and in the actual numbers on Income Support both in London and throughout the UK. This indicator will be particular relevant as the economic downturn begins to bite. Key Performance Indicator 11a Improving the provision of social infrastructure and related services. Target An increase in the provision of childcare places per 1000 under fives, particularly in Areas of Regeneration. This is a new target as a result of the London Plan 2008 and replaces the previous Key Performance indicator 11 which assessed the 15 separate “floor targets” which the Government uses to assess how the most deprived local authorities in England are performing on fundamental quality of life factors. Th0se floor targets are still available at http://www.fti.neighbourhood.gov.uk/page.asp?id=5 The published statistics on childcare are compiled by Ofsted and are only available at borough level. Therefore for this AMR proxy data has been used. The regeneration wards have been approximated by using the six boroughs with the highest populations in regeneration wards namely, Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets, Islington, Southwark and Haringey. These six boroughs account for 68% of the London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 43


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    population within regeneration wards. There is variable provision amongst the 6 boroughs with Islington considerably above the London and national average and Newham at half the national average. It is clear that London as a whole is below the national average with only 77% of the places per 1000 under 5s. There is a considerable amount of variation between boroughs, so three of the main regeneration boroughs are above average and three are well below. Table 28 Places in day nurseries Sept 2004 August 2008 % Change 2004- Number of Places per Number of Places per 2008 Places per places 1000 places 1000 1000 under 5s under 5s under 5s Hackney 2500 143 3,400 179 +25% Newham 2300 109 2,400 105 -4% Tower Hamlets 2000 120 2,100 113 -6% Islington 2700 233 3,300 270 +16% Southwark 3000 165 3,600 188 +14% Haringey 1300 80 1,900 113 +41% 6 boroughs 13,800 136 16,700 154 +13% total Rest of London 56,700 146 68,000 164 +12% London 70,500 144 84,700 162 +12.5% England 500,700 176 635,600 209 +19% Sources: Registered childcare places from Ofsted Quarterly Childcare Statistics at 31 August 2008 and GLA calculations based on GLA 2007 Round of Demographic projections and England population from Office for National Statistics 2004-based Subnational Population Projections London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 44


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    Key Performance Indicator 11b Improving the provision of social infrastructure and related services. Target An improvement in the percentage of pupils obtaining five or more GCSEs at grades A*-C in areas of Regeneration relative to the LEA as a whole. This is a new target as a result of the London Plan 2008 and replaces the previous Key Performance indicator 11 which assessed the 15 separate “floor targets” which the Government uses to assess how the most deprived local authorities in England are performing on fundamental quality of life factors. Those floor targets are still available at http://www.fti.neighbourhood.gov.uk/page.asp?id=5 Table 29 GCSE A*-C Grade Passes Area % passing 5+ A*-C Grades Barking and Dagenham 56.7 Barking and Dagenham Regeneration Wards 48.7 Brent 61.0 Brent Regeneration Wards 48.4 Camden 52.4 Camden Regeneration Wards 49.9 Croydon 56.9 Croydon Regeneration Wards 41.8 Enfield 55.8 Enfield Regeneration Wards 38.6 Greenwich 50.7 Greenwich Regeneration Wards 42.5 Hackney 51.6 Hackney Regeneration Wards 51.6 Hammersmith and Fulham 54.3 Hammersmith and Fulham Regeneration Wards 54.8 Haringey 55.2 Haringey Regeneration Wards 52.2 Islington 51.6 Islington Regeneration Wards 50.9 Source Kensington and Chelsea 55.5 DMAG Education, 2007 English Kensington and Chelsea Regeneration Wards 47.0 National Pupil Dataset Lambeth 51.4 Notes: Lambeth Regeneration Wards 51.0 1) Data are for pupils on roll in Lewisham 55.0 maintained mainstream and special Lewisham Regeneration Wards 56.1 schools (i.e. pupils attending Newham 54.9 independent schools or Pupil Newham Regeneration Wards 54.6 Referral Units are not included) 2) Data are for pupils aged 15 at Southwark 52.3 the start of the school year and who Southwark Regeneration Wards 49.9 were on roll in January 2007. These Tower Hamlets 56.0 pupils would have reached the end Tower Hamlets Regeneration Wards 56.6 of compulsory schooling in summer Waltham Forest 56.0 2007. Waltham Forest Regeneration Wards 42.9 3) Examination results are for all Westminster 52.7 pupils. National Performance Tables Westminster Regeneration Wards 47.1 exclude pupils who are recent Inner London 54.0 arrivals Outer London 62.0 4) Pupils are grouped by their home Greater London 59.4 ward, that is figures are for locally- Regeneration Wards 51.1 resident pupils regardless of where England 59.4 they attend school. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 45


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    In 2007 a total of 16,497 pupils sat GCSEs within the 20% most deprived wards in London (ie the Areas for Regeneration). Of these 8434 passes five or more at grades A*- C giving a percentage of 51.1%. This compares to the London wide rate of 59.4%. In some boroughs the difference between the attainment within the Regeneration Wards and the borough as a whole is market, for example Enfield, Croydon and Waltham Forest. This often highlights the fact that these boroughs have a small (1-3) number of regeneration wards. In other boroughs the distinct is less clear cut and in 3 boroughs the attainment in the regeneration wards is actually above that of the borough as a whole. Attainment in Inner London is generally below that of outer London but the combination puts London at the same pass rate as England as a whole. It is noticeable that in some boroughs the educational performance in the regeneration areas is actually above the borough wide performance. Objective 5 to improve London’s accessibility Key Performance Indicator 12 Achieve a reduced reliance on the private car and a more sustainable modal split for journeys Target Use of public transport per head grows faster than use of the private car per head. Table 30 Public and private transport indexes Year Public Transport index Private Transport Index 2001 100.0 100.0 2002 103.2 97.7 2003 108.9 95.2 2004 114.5 92.3 2005 113.3 93.4 2006 116.5 92.2 2007 122.4 90.5 Note: figures adjusted from previous AMRs due to revisions to population data but the overall picture remains similar. The private transport index, derived from the traffic series for car and motorcycle movements in London, has been adjusted to take account of TfL’s revisions to the series published by DfT See Note under KPI13 Source: Transport for London The indices are derived from the time series of numbers of journey stages per head compiled for the 2008 London Travel Report. This includes all travel to, from or within Greater London, including travel by commuters and visitors. For consistency the population estimates include in-commuters and visitors (derived from the Labour Force Survey and the International Passenger Survey, respectively). The results show a 22% increase in public transport journey stages per head between 2001 and 2007, compared with a 9% decrease in car journeys per head. 2007 saw a continuing drop in the use of the car and an increase in the use of public transport, which has increased steadily apart from a dip in 2005 that has been put down to the impact of the London bombings in July 2005. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 46


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    Key Performance Indicator 13 Achieve a reduced reliance on the private car and a more sustainable modal split for journeys. Target From 2001-2011, 15 per cent reduction in traffic in the congestion charging zone, zero traffic growth in inner London, and traffic growth in outer London reduced to no more than 5 per cent. London Plan Policy 3C.16 – ‘Tackling congestion and reducing traffic’ –sets out targets for reductions in weekday traffic growth for different areas of London. Monitoring by Transport for London within the area of the Congestion Charging Zone has shown that levels of traffic (for vehicles of four or more wheels) fell by 15 per cent between 2002 and 2003 and continued to decline to a level of up to 20% below 2002 by 2005. Available indicators of traffic circulating within the charging zone suggest broadly stable or slightly declining traffic levels in 2006 compared with the previous year and a further reduction of 2% in 2007. No change was observed between 2006 and 2007 in traffic entering the zone during charging hours, which remained as a level of 21% below its pre-charging level in 2002. Estimates by TfL using London data from DfT’s traffic counts for the National Road Traffic Estimates indicate that in inner London (outside Central London) annual traffic on major roads declined by 1% between 2006 and 2007 after increasing by 3% in the previous year. Traffic was 3% lower in 2007 than in 2001. In outer London, traffic on major roads also declined by 3% between 2001 and 2007. Overall, when minor roads are included, traffic declined steadily between 2001 and 2004 before levelling off and in 2007 remains 1% lower in 2001 in both inner London (outside Central London) and outer London. Note: Transport for London (TfL) needs accurate and robust traffic estimates to meet a wide range of requirements for its modelling, planning, and other work. It relies heavily on official statistics published by the Department for Transport (DfT) to meet those requirements. DfT's primary purpose is to provide robust estimates for Great Britain as a whole. Estimates broken down by local area and by road type are less robust. In this context DfT are undertaking a programme of work implementing recommendations from the National Statistics Quality Review of Road Traffic Estimates which highlighted minor roads as an area for improvement. TfL has reservations that DfT's current methodology for estimating minor roads traffic has not reflected minor roads traffic trends in London, with sufficient accuracy, to be fit for TfL's purposes. Therefore TfL have produced an alternative set of estimates, for each calendar year from 1999 to 2006, which are much closer to the trends indicated by TfL's own data. DfT are content for TfL to use these estimates for its own purposes. TfL welcomes DfT's steps to improve its minor roads' traffic estimates, and the two organisations have identified opportunities to share traffic data between them. Taken together, these steps are expected to lead to a substantially improved understanding of traffic trends in London. Key Performance Indicator 14 Achieve a reduced reliance on the private car and a more sustainable modal split for journeys Target A five per cent increase in passengers and freight transported on the Blue Ribbon Network from 2001-2011. Table 31 Passengers on the River Thames Year Number of Passengers1 % increase on previous year April 2000 – March 2001 1 573 830 - April 2001 – March 2002 2 011 736 28% April 2002 – March 2003 2 030 385 1% April 2003 – March 2004 2 123 820 4.6% April 2004 – March 2005 2,343,280 10.3% April 2005 – March 2006 2,373,350 1% April 2006 - March 2007 2,746,700 15.7% April 2007 - March 2008 3,078,300 12.1% Source: TfL London River Services London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 47


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    Note 1 Figures are for passenger journeys on boat operators using TfL London River Services Piers and the Thames Clippers Savoy (London Eye from November 2007) to Woolwich Arsenal service. This excludes a number of other services working from independent piers. Figures also include passengers on charter boats. Ticket sales count both single and return tickets as one journey on all services except Thames Clippers which are passenger journeys. The table shows that the number of passengers on the Thames is steadily increasing over the baseline situation in 2001. The overall picture is of almost doubling river passengers since 2001 – a 96% increase). Following the events of 7 July 2005, passenger numbers on tourist services fell significantly, but have now recovered to previous levels. Passenger numbers on the riverbus services have shown significant growth since July 2005. In November 2007, Thames Clippers riverbus service was expanded to run between Waterloo (BA London Eye) and the O2 at a 20 minute frequency throughout the day and every 30 minutes in the late evening. It is anticipated that the number of passengers carried on the Thames will continue to show strong growth. Table 32 Cargo trade on the River Thames Year Tonnes of Cargo % increase on previous year 2001 10 757 000 - 2002 9 806 000 9% decrease 2003 9 236 000 6% decrease 2004 8 743 000 5% decrease 2005 9,288,000 6% increase 2006 9,337,000 0.5% increase 2007 8,642,000 7% decrease Source: Port of London Authority. The Table shows a 7% decrease in the amount of cargo handled within the London part of the Port of London during 2007. This still means that there has been a net decrease of nearly 20% overall from the baseline year of 2001. The main changes were due to a reduction in aggregates shipment to West India Dock, the closure of Arcelor Wharf in Barking and a reduction in scrap metal shipment. Looking forward the Port of London Authority remains positive that cargo volumes will increase due to general trade forecasts and the fact that a number of major construction project intend to use the river including Crossrail, Thames Tideway Sewer and continued Olympics and Stratford City related development. The Mayor will review the forecasts and the overall scale and distribution of wharves required to serve this market during 2009 and 2010. London Plan Annual Monitoring Report 5 – February 2009 48

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