avatar Select Energy Services, LLC Mining

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    REDUCING WATER EMISSIONS SUSTAINABILITY Treated or recycled over 6 billion gallons of water in 2020, significantly reducing the need for fresh water for our customers SUSTAINABLE HEALTH & DIVERSITY & TECHNOLOGY SAFETY INCLUSION


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    have the potential for repurposing produced water for new beneficial uses outside of the industry – ultimately, instead of simply disposing it, contributing back to the total water cycle. Water recycling and reuse is a core focus of our near-term and long-term strategy and is a critical way for Select to help our customers achieve the sustainability targets we need in this A Letter to industry. Stockholders We have formed deep customer relationships across an operational footprint covering all active basins that will help us advance this strategy. For example, we recently March 24, 2021 announced partnerships with two blue chip operators in the core of the Permian, commencing two produced water I’m excited to have stepped back into the role of CEO of Select recycling projects in the basin backed by long-term contracts Energy Services in addition to my position as Chairman of the totaling 80,000 barrels per day of capacity. These recycling Board and founder of the company. Select has a bright future facilities offer streamlined water logistics, reduced costs, as one of the few companies that has the expertise to deliver and improved ESG capture through reduced environmental on the oil and gas industry’s demand for fully integrated and impact. sustainable water and chemical solutions. Our integrated In addition to water recycling and reuse, Select has decreased water and chemical offerings, innovative technology, and carbon emissions through its automation solutions, which continuous focus on R&D strengthens our position as we increase efficiency and subsequently decreases fuel usage, advance the water market towards a sustainable water reuse and specialized flowback technology that captures and lifecycle. We have a strong business model and are focused reduces methane emissions on site. Over the last decade, on growing our profitability through value-add solutions for we have transformed the industry through our innovative our customers. temporary and fixed pipeline solutions. By transporting As we all know, water is vital to the health, economic, and water through our pipeline logistics solutions, we decrease social well-being of the communities in which we live and the number of trucks on the roads, significantly reducing work. Select focuses on developing sustainable water diesel exhaust emissions, increasing safety, and relieving solutions every day, with a commitment to conservation and traffic congestion in the communities in which we operate. reuse. In addition to improving efficiency and reducing costs, We estimate that in 2020 alone, Select reduced CO2 emissions exploration & production companies are working to reduce by more than 48,000 metric tons by eliminating 1.6 million their environmental impact by successfully delivering on truck trips from the roads. Select’s automation, monitoring, their Environmental, Social, and Corporate Governance (ESG) data capture, and real-time analytics provides spill controls, goals. Our customers are looking for partners that can help lowers fuel consumption, enhances safety improvements them meet their ESG targets – and Select is able to provide and reduces costs. Select deploys solar power on most of them with risk reduction, water use its automation fleet and continues to optimization, and quality control. This develop solutions to replace diesel with not only provides our customers better Water recycling and reuse is a core natural gas, electricity or solar panels. Our operating results, but also positions focus of our near-term and long- Chemicals team, in addition to focusing them to effectively work toward their term strategy and is a critical way on water reuse, is using renewable raw sustainability objectives through for Select to help our customers materials and developing biodegradable reducing demand for fresh water. achieve the sustainability targets we chemistry. need in this industry. Select’s dedicated team of specialists are Our asset base and our service skills are out there every day developing and deploying innovative mobile and agnostic to whether our customers are developing technologies and services that create safer, more efficient oil or gas. We believe these flexible assets and skills will and more cost-effective solutions for our customers. These be part of the energy transition for our current customers solutions include opportunities to recycle and repurpose and new customers alike – and expect more customers produced water for reuse in new well completions instead and recycling projects will come our way to achieve the of using fresh water. Over the long-term, these solutions sustainability targets needed in the industry today. Select


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    will play an important role in building unique opportunities to deploy our Select will play an important role the water and chemical solutions that water solutions and chemical products. in building the water and chemical are designed to meet the sustainability Last year, this group got off to a good solutions that are designed to goals of all stakeholders, including our start by landing a contract to provide a meet the sustainability goals of customers, employees, stockholders, and range of sustainable water solutions to all stakeholders, including our local communities. an industrial paper company. Given this customers, employees, stockholders, and local communities. success, we will continue to leverage When the effects of the COVID-19 our expertise in water logistics, fluid pandemic presented sudden and significant challenges management, chemical manufacturing, and R&D to advance to the oil and gas industry and the economy as a whole, new opportunities across the large industrial market. we acted quickly and decisively to right-size the cost structure of Select. We significantly reduced our costs and While we are excited about our organic growth opportunities, emphasized maintaining a strong balance sheet with no we also believe we have meaningful opportunity to realize debt, while increasing our cash and liquidity. At the same value through strategic investments and M&A. Select sits in time, we remained focused on keeping our people safe while a very strong position in the marketplace as a market leader continuing to support our customers’ critical operations. in sustainable water and chemical solutions, with no debt, We are proud of our safety programs and our employees’ strong Free Cash Flow, a public currency, and a substantial relentless focus on operating and working safely, especially cash balance. We will continue to pursue strategic and through such a difficult year. accretive M&A in a prudent and disciplined way, building on our strong acquisition track record. We will also look for In 2020, we generated $103 million of free cash flow and ways to directly invest in interesting technologies to gain finished the year with $169 million of cash, up from $79 million access to prospects that we believe give Select a competitive at year-end 2019. Over the last three years, through drastically advantage. Through strategic investments and M&A, I think different market environments, we were able to generate we can deliver better returns with lower overhead while nearly $290 million of free cash flow, allowing us to pay off our combining company-wide strengths and providing more revolver balance, make a number of significant investments comprehensive solutions for our customers. in the business, maintain our assets, and return capital to stockholders while still building a sizeable cash balance. We There are definitely a lot of opportunities out there, and I built Select to be a capital and asset light business and we am confident we will find a way to execute our strategy. But, plan to continue to do more with less. with all that said, we will continue to safeguard the balance sheet and prioritize cash flow and return on capital employed Looking ahead, Select is in a great position to expand and above all other financial metrics. capture market share with more value-add services to our customers during the recovery. I believe we successfully met In closing, I would like to thank our employees for their the challenges of 2020 by continuing to differentiate Select continued dedication and incredible hard work over the last from our competition through innovation, technology, year – and our thoughts are with all of those affected directly scale, service quality, and cost management. As the leader or indirectly by COVID-19. in sustainable water & chemical solutions for the oilfield, we Thank you for your continued support of Select Energy. are intently focused on finding synergies between these water and chemical services to bring value to our customer base and capture market share, both in terms of number of Sincerely, projects and in dollar-capture per job. We believe this will allow Select to return to the profitability that we had in the past. While most of our current expertise was developed for the oilfield, there are many applications for our sustainable water John D. Schmitz Chairman, President & Chief Executive Officer and chemical solutions in other verticals of the oil and gas industry and other industries outside our core focus today that we intend to pursue. In 2020, we formed an Industrial Solutions group, which has already identified new and


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    UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Washington, D.C. 20549 FORM 10-K (Mark One) ☒ ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020. OR ☐ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the transition period from to Commission file number 001-38066 Select Energy Services, Inc. (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter) Delaware 81 -4561945 (State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization) (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.) 1233 W. Loop South, Suite 1400 77027 Houston, Texas (Address of Principal Executive Offices) (Zip Code) Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (713) 235-9500 Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: Title of each class Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered Class A common stock, par value $0.01 per share WTTR New York Stock Exchange Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: NONE Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐ No ☑ Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐ No ☑ Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☑ No ☐ Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☑ No ☐ Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. Large Accelerated Filer ☐ Accelerated Filer ☑ Non-accelerated Filer ☐ Smaller reporting company ☐ Emerging growth company ☐ If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐ Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ☐ No ☑ Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. ☑ The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant computed as of June 30, 2020 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recent completed second fiscal quarter) based on the closing price of the Class A common stock on the New York Stock Exchange was $284.2 million. There were 86,437,630 and 16,221,101 shares of the registrant’s Class A and Class B common stock, respectively, outstanding as of February 22, 2021. Documents Incorporated by Reference: Portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement for the 2021 annual meeting of stockholders, to be filed no later than 120 days after the end of the fiscal year, are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.


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    Table of Contents Page PART I Item 1. Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Item 1A. Risk Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Item 2. Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Item 3. Legal Proceedings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 PART II Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Item 6. Selected Financial Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Item 9A. Controls and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Item 9B. Other Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 PART III Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Item 11. Executive Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters . . 83 Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 PART IV Item 15. Exhibit and Financial Statement Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 1


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    PART I CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS The information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K includes “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). All statements, other than statements of historical fact, included in this Annual Report regarding our strategy, future operations, financial position, estimated revenues and losses, projected costs, prospects, plans and objectives of management are forward-looking statements. When used in this Annual Report, the words “could,” “believe,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “estimate,” “expect,” “project,” “preliminary,” “forecast,” and similar expressions or variations are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain such identifying words. These forward-looking statements are based on our current expectations and assumptions about future events and are based on currently available information as to the outcome and timing of future events. When considering forward-looking statements, you should keep in mind the risk factors and other cautionary statements described under the heading “Risk Factors” included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, as well as those set forth from time to time in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). These forward -looking statements are based on management’s current belief, based on currently available information, as to the outcome and timing of future events. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, those summarized below: • following his inauguration on January 20, 2021, President Biden issued several executive orders and made other announcements which may negatively impact the future production of oil and natural gas in the United States (“U.S.”) and may adversely affect our future operations; • the severity and duration of world health events, including the novel coronavirus (“COVID-19”) pandemic, which has caused a sharp decline in economic activity in the U.S. and around the world, resulting in lower demand for oil and gas, oversupply and therefore lower oil and gas prices, to which our exploration and production (“E&P”) customers have responded by cutting capital spending, leading to fewer oil and gas well completions and thus reduced demand for our services, all of which has had, and will likely continue to have, a negative impact on our financial results; • actions taken by the members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (“OPEC”) and Russia (together with OPEC and other allied producing countries, “OPEC+”) with respect to oil production levels and announcements of potential changes in such levels, including the ability of the OPEC+ countries to agree on and comply with announced supply limitations; • the potential deterioration of our customers’ financial condition, including defaults resulting from actual or potential insolvencies; • the level of capital spending and access to capital markets by oil and gas companies, including significant recent reductions and potential additional reductions in capital expenditures by oil and gas producers in response to commodity prices and reduced demand; • operational challenges relating to the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to mitigate the spread of the virus, including logistical challenges, measures taken to protect the health and well-being of our employees, remote work arrangements, performance of contracts and supply chain disruptions; • the degree to which consolidation among our customers may affect spending on U.S. drilling and completions in the near-term; • trends and volatility in oil and gas prices, and our ability to manage through such volatility; 2


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    • our customers’ ability to complete and produce new wells; • the impact of current and future laws, rulings and governmental regulations, including those related to hydraulic fracturing, accessing water, disposing of wastewater, transferring produced water, interstate freshwater transfer, chemicals, carbon pricing, pipeline construction, taxation or emissions, leasing, permitting or drilling on federal lands and various other environmental matters; • regional impacts to our business, including our key infrastructure assets within the Bakken and the Northern Delaware portion of the Permian Basin; • capacity constraints on regional oil, natural gas and water gathering, processing and pipeline systems that result in a slowdown or delay in drilling and completion activity, and thus a slowdown or delay in the demand for our services in our core markets; • regulatory and related policy actions intended by federal, state and/or local governments to reduce fossil fuel use and associated carbon emissions, or to drive the substitution of renewable forms of energy for oil and gas, may over time reduce demand for oil and gas and therefore the demand for our services; • new or expanded regulations that materially limit our customers’ access to federal and state lands for oil and gas development, thereby reducing demand for our services in the affected areas; • growing demand for electric vehicles that result in reduced demand for gasoline; • our ability to retain key management and employees; • our ability to hire and retain skilled labor; • our access to capital to fund expansions, acquisitions and our working capital needs and our ability to obtain debt or equity financing on satisfactory terms; • our health, safety and environmental performance; • the impact of competition on our operations; • the degree to which our E&P customers may elect to operate their water-management services in-house rather than source these services from companies like us; • our level of indebtedness and our ability to comply with covenants contained in our Credit Agreement (as defined herein) or future debt instruments; • delays or restrictions in obtaining permits by us or our customers; • constraints in supply or availability of equipment used in our business; • the impact of advances or changes in well-completion technologies or practices that result in reduced demand for our services, either on a volumetric or time basis; • changes in global political or economic conditions, generally, and in the markets we serve; • acts of terrorism, war or political or civil unrest in the United States or elsewhere; • the ability to source certain raw materials globally from economically advantaged sources; 3


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    • accidents, weather, seasonality or other events affecting our business; and • the other risks identified in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including, without limitation, those under the headings “Item 1A. Risk Factors,” “Item 1. Business,” “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” (“MD&A”) and “Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.” These factors are not necessarily all of the important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any of our forward -looking statements. Other unknown or unpredictable factors also could have material adverse effects on our future results. Our future results will depend upon various other risks and uncertainties, including those described elsewhere in this Annual Report. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements after the date they are made, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. All forward-looking statements attributable to us are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary note. 4


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    Risk Factor Summary Risks Related to Business Operations • Reductions in capital spending by the oil and gas industry in the U.S., including due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and reduced prices resulting from the current oversupply of oil, could negatively impact our business. • The widespread outbreak of any communicable disease, such as COVID-19, could reduce the demand for oil, ultimately reducing demand for our services. • Continued volatility in oil and/or natural gas prices may adversely affect the demand for our services. • Our key infrastructure assets in North Dakota and in New Mexico make us vulnerable to risks associated with conducting business in these regions. • Restrictions on the ability to procure water or changes in sourcing requirements could decrease demand for some of our services. • Regulatory and societal efforts to reduce fossil fuel use and associated carbon emissions could reduce demand for oil and natural gas, and thereby the demand for our services. • We have operated at a loss in the past, including in 2020, and there is no assurance of profitability in the future. • We may be subject to claims for personal injury and property damage. • We are subject to cybersecurity risks. • We may be adversely affected by uncertainty in the global financial markets and a worldwide economic downturn. • Disruptions in the transportation services of trucking companies transporting wastewater. • A significant increase in fuel prices may adversely affect our transportation costs. Risks Related to Customers and Suppliers • Significant price volatility or interruptions in supply of our raw materials for our chemicals business may result in increased costs and negatively impact our financial results. Risks Related to Compliance with Regulations • Legislative and regulatory initiatives in the U.S. relating to hydraulic fracturing could result in operating restrictions, delays or cancellations in our customers’ operations, reducing demand for our services. • Our and our customers’ operations are subject to a number of regulatory risks as a result of climate change initiatives. • Our chemical products are subject to regulations that tend to become more onerous over time, that could result in increased costs. Risks Related to Personnel and Related Parties • Our industry typically experiences a high rate of employee turnover. • Transactions with related parties present possible conflicts of interest. Risks Related to Our Capital Structure • Failure to maintain and enhance an effective system of internal controls could reduce the trading price of our common stock. • We may incur indebtedness or issue additional equity securities to execute our long-term growth strategy. • Our Credit Agreement subjects us to various financial and other restrictive covenants. • Future sales of our equity securities may depress our share price or dilute your ownership. • Provisions in our governing documents and Delaware law may discourage takeover attempts. • SES Legacy Holdings, LLC (“Legacy Owner Holdco”) controls a significant percentage of our voting power. • Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation may limit certain corporate opportunities. 5


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    • Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation designates the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware as the sole and exclusive forum for certain types of actions and proceedings. Risks Related to Our Organizational Structure • We are a holding company and our sole material asset consists of common units (“SES Holdings LLC Units”) in SES Holdings, LLC (“SES Holdings”), which we are dependent upon for distributions and payments. • We are party to two tax receivable agreements (the “Tax Receivable Agreements”) that require payments for certain tax benefits, and such payment amounts could be significant. • In certain cases, payments under the Tax Receivable Agreements may be accelerated and/or significantly exceed the actual benefits. • If SES Holdings were to become a publicly-traded partnership taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we could experience tax inefficiencies. • Legacy Owner Holdco and existing and former owners of outstanding membership interests in SES Holdings prior to the December 2016 private placement of 16,100,000 shares of our Class A-1 common stock at $20.00 per share (the “Select 144A Offering”) and the related reorganization (“Legacy Owners”) may have interests that conflict with the interests of holders of the Class A common stock. • Our ability to use Rockwater’s U.S. federal net operating loss carryforwards (“NOLs”) may be limited. General Risks • We may not be able to finance future growth of our operations or future acquisitions. • The growth of our business through acquisitions may expose us to various risks. • Our success depends on key members of our management. • We may be required to take write-downs of the carrying values of our long-lived assets and finite-lived intangible assets. • We may be required to take a write-down of the carrying value of goodwill. ITEM 1. BUSINESS Select Energy Services, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries (collectively referred to as “Select,” the “Company,” “we,” “us,” or “our”) is a leading provider of comprehensive water-management and chemical solutions to the oil and gas industry in the United States (“U.S.”). We also develop, manufacture and deliver a full suite of chemical products for use in oil and gas well completion and production operations. As a leader in the water solutions industry, we place the utmost importance on safe, environmentally responsible management of oilfield water throughout the lifecycle of a well. Additionally, we believe that responsibly managing water resources through our operations to help conserve and protect the environment in the communities in which we operate is paramount to our continued success. Within the major shale plays in the U.S., we operate through three primary segments: Water Services, Water Infrastructure and Oilfield Chemicals. Our Water Services segment, which contributed approximately 53% of our 2020 revenue and 60% of our 2019 revenue, provides the complex services needed to support new oil and gas well completions as well as ongoing production over the life of the well, including water transfer, flowback and well testing, water containment, fluids hauling, water monitoring and water network automation, as well as various on-site rental equipment and accommodation offerings. Through our patented WaterONE™ automation services and our AquaView® software platform, our Water Services segment also provides extensive technology solutions that enable 24/7 monitoring and visibility for our customers into all of their water-related operations, including hydrographic mapping, water volume and quality monitoring, remote pit and tank monitoring, leak detection, asset and fuel tracking and automated-equipment services. We believe these technologies help our customers lower their operating costs, increase safety and reduce the environmental footprint of their operations. 6


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    Our Water Infrastructure segment, which contributed approximately 21% of our 2020 revenue and 17% of our 2019 revenue, develops, builds and operates semi-permanent and permanent infrastructure solutions to support both new oil and gas well development as well as ongoing production activity, including water sourcing, recycling and disposal of water as well as the associated logistics. As our customers transition from appraisal to full-field development, our fixed infrastructure offerings can provide economies of scale that help reduce their capital expenditures and lease operating expenses over the life of the field. Water Infrastructure operations provide for both the delivery of and the takeaway and reuse of water enabled by a network of water sources, permanent pipeline infrastructure, semi-permanent pipeline infrastructure, fixed and mobile treatment and recycling facilities, earthen pits and saltwater disposal wells (“SWDs”). Our Oilfield Chemicals segment, which contributed approximately 26% of our 2020 revenue and 21% of our 2019 revenue, develops, manufactures and provides a full suite of completion and production chemical products, water treatment solutions and services utilized in hydraulic fracturing, stimulation, cementing and related well completion and production processes. Our completion chemicals are sold primarily to leading pressure-pumping service companies and E&P companies in the U.S., to support well stimulation and completion. Our production chemicals are used by oil and gas companies to enhance well performance and reduce production costs throughout the life of a well. Our well chemical services provide customized water treatment and flow assurance solutions across the completion and production lifecycle. Additionally, through our FluidMatch™ solutions, we provide comprehensive testing and analysis of our customer’s application conditions, product chemistry and key performance requirements for oil and gas well completion fluid-system design. This process may include water profiling, application and fluid assessment, treatment assessment, product selection, optimization and customization. Industry and Company Overview Over the past two decades, advancements in horizontal drilling and completions technologies have led to a significant and sustained growth in oil and natural gas production in the U.S. Advances in drilling and completion technology have propelled U.S. shale-oil production from about 500,000 barrels per day in 2010 to more than seven million barrels per day currently. While U.S. shale oil production has declined from the peak levels of more than nine million barrels per day seen before the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. shale oil production has increased as a percentage of total global oil supply in the past year to approximately 8% of total global oil supply. Additionally, U.S. shale gas production has increased from about 15 billion cubic feet per day in 2010 to about 70 billion cubic feet per day currently, or more than 18% of global supply. This growth has dramatically impacted fundamental global supply and demand dynamics and has resulted in a generally balanced to over-supplied market in recent years. While demand for oil and natural gas has increased over the last ten years, demand is cyclical and subject to many factors. Over the course of 2020, the market was significantly impacted by demand declines driven by the economic disruption resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Demand for our services is largely influenced by the level of drilling and completion activity by E&P companies, which in turn depends largely on the current and anticipated profitability of developing oil and natural gas reserves. More specifically, demand for most of our services is driven primarily by the number of new well completions and the timing and type of well completions. Water is essential to the development and completion of unconventional oil and gas wells, where producers rely on hydraulic fracturing to stimulate the production of oil and gas from low permeability subsurface rock formations. The modern hydraulic fracturing process involves the injection of large volumes of water and proppant (typically sand) together with chemicals, under high pressure, through a cased and cemented wellbore into targeted subsurface formations thousands of feet below ground to fracture the surrounding rock. Modern hydraulic fracturing involves complex, engineered, environmentally conscious solutions to produce oil and gas from tight geological formations in a cost effective manner. The volume of water required to economically produce tight oil and gas reserves in the U.S. has grown dramatically in recent years and water and water-related services now comprise a meaningful portion of our customers’ drilling and completion budgets. For example, in 2010, the completion of a typical horizontal well could require roughly 75,000 barrels of water, but today, current horizontal well completion designs can call for in excess of 500,000 barrels for a single well. Our customers’ current, state-of-the-art multi-well pad development plans can require in excess of five million barrels to complete all of the wells on the pad. Significant mechanical, logistical, environmental and safety issues related to the transfer, blending and subsequent containment of such large volumes of water have increased both the total cost of water and related services and the complexity and importance of the services required. This trend has 7


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    shifted many of our customers’ operational focus away from traditional small, local water service providers, to larger regional and national players like us, who have the expertise, technology and scale to provide high-quality, reliable, comprehensive and environmentally sound water-management solutions for the full extent of the water lifecycle. These logistical challenges are typically met through a combination of temporary and permanent solutions utilizing pipe and hose infrastructure, combined with the development of a large-scale portfolio of water rights and impoundments, which significantly reduces the cost and environmental footprint compared to legacy solutions such as tank truck and frac tank operations. For a single representative multi-well pad that requires five million barrels of water, we can utilize our pipe and hose infrastructure solutions and eliminate the rough equivalent of 38,500 tank truck loads from the roads. This significantly reduces the capital expenditure costs for our customers while dramatically improving the safety of our operations, and reduces the environmental impact of our customers’ operations by limiting spills and diesel exhaust emissions, as well as the community impact of heavy vehicle traffic. We also develop and source completion chemicals that are a key part of the U.S. production growth story. Completion chemicals are blended with water to improve the transport and placement of proppant in targeted zones within the producing formation. The induced fractures near the wellbore allow hydrocarbons to flow into the wellbore for extraction. Our team of chemists and research and development personnel work directly with our customers to support the optimization of their fracturing fluid systems through our FluidMatch™ solutions. Through laboratory and application experience, we apply our expertise in fracturing chemistry to develop, manufacture and supply a wide range of specialized and customizable products to our customers for their fracturing fluid systems. Further, up to fifty percent of the water pumped into the well during the hydraulic fracturing process returns as “flowback” during the first several weeks following the well completion process, and a large percentage of the remainder, plus pre-existing water in the formation, is recovered as produced water over the life of the well. The total volumes of flowback and produced water are even greater than the volumes used for new well completions―by some estimates, the U.S. oil and gas industry today produces over 20 billion barrels of water per year and this volume is likely to grow. This flowback and produced water must be captured, contained and then either treated and recycled for reuse in subsequent fracturing jobs or disposed of in an environmentally sound manner. We provide services that support the operator’s management of flowback and produced water for either reuse or disposal. Additionally, our customized chemical treatment programs help improve well productivity and reduce production costs, thereby extending the economic life of our customers’ oil and gas wells. As produced water volumes have significantly grown in recent years, logistical advancements similar to those seen in the delivery of source water volumes for new well completions have been developed for managing these produced water volumes. Increasingly, the transportation of these produced water volumes has shifted away from traditional tank truck operations and onto gathering pipeline infrastructure for disposal or reuse. This significantly reduces the lease operating costs for our customers over the life of a well, while also reducing the environmental impact of our customers’ operations by limiting spills and diesel exhaust emissions and reducing truck traffic in our local communities. We believe the industry will increasingly turn to specialized water solutions companies like us to help cost-effectively manage produced water in an environmentally responsible way. Recent Developments COVID-19 Pandemic The U.S. oil and gas industry has been and continues to be significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Beginning during the latter stages of the first quarter of 2020 and through the second quarter of 2020, demand for our services significantly declined, followed by a modest and gradual increase in demand in the second half of 2020, although still significantly below 2019 levels. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and measures taken in response by governments and businesses worldwide to contain its spread, including quarantines, facility closures, travel and logistics restrictions, border controls, and stay- at-home and social distancing orders, have adversely impacted oil and gas prices and ultimately demand for our services. 8


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    While we have seen a recent increase in oil prices, we cannot predict how long these increases will last or when the negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic to demand for new oil and gas production will end. The degree to which the pandemic impacts our financial condition and results of operations and the global economy depends on developments beyond our control, which are highly uncertain and difficult to predict, including the severity and duration of the pandemic, the extent and effectiveness of containment actions, the availability and application of effective vaccines against COVID-19, effectiveness of government stimulus programs, potential future resurgence of COVID-19 or related strains, how quickly and to what extent normal economic and operating activity can resume, and the severity and duration of the global economic downturn that has resulted from the pandemic. See Item 15, Note 4—Impairments and Other Costs for additional discussion on the impact of COVID-19 on our operations and financial condition. Permian Basin Recycling Facility Projects We were recently awarded two new produced water recycling facility contracts serving key customers in the Permian Basin. Once completed, these state-of-the-art facilities will allow us to leverage our expertise in frac chemistry and fluid optimization to provide customers with a consistent water quality standard for use in completion activities. These investments will bring our total centralized produced water recycling capacity in the Permian Basin to approximately 250,000 barrels of water per day, which is supplemented by our mobile recycling technologies and capabilities that are currently supporting nearly 150,000 barrels per day of active produced water recycling projects. We have commenced construction on the first facility, a new fixed infrastructure produced water recycling facility project serving the core of the Midland Basin in both Martin and Midland Counties, Texas. The Company expects to invest approximately $5 million in this facility, which should be fully operational by the end of the first quarter of 2021. This project is supported by a long-term contract with a leading, large independent operator in the Midland Basin for the purchase and delivery of recycled produced water. This facility will support the recycling of up to 50,000 barrels of water per day while providing 2 million barrels of recycled water storage capacity. Additional incremental capacity beyond the contracted volumes creates an additional opportunity for growth with the contracted customer, as well as the opportunity to further commercialize the facility to support the needs of other operators in the area. We are also developing a centralized produced water recycling facility for a major integrated operator in Loving County, Texas in the Delaware Basin. This facility is designed to recycle up to 30,000 barrels of produced water per day and will be supported by 1 million barrels of adjacent recycled water storage capacity. We expect this facility to also be fully operational by the end of the first quarter of 2021. This project supplements the Company’s sizable existing footprint of water storage, distribution and recycling infrastructure in the Delaware Basin. Human Capital As of December 31, 2020, we had approximately 2,000 employees and no unionized labor. We believe we have good relations with our employees. We consider our employees vital to our success and are focused on attracting, developing and retaining the most qualified employees at all levels of our business. In particular, the quality of our customer service depends significantly on employee satisfaction and retention. We strive to create a productive and collaborative work environment for our employees. To attract talent and meet the needs of our employees, we offer a competitive benefits package for regular, full- time employees including health benefits such as medical, dental and vision, welfare benefits such as life and accident insurance, and a qualified defined contribution plan to all eligible employees. We also provide our employees with resources for professional development including training, feedback and performance reviews from supervisors. Our human capital measures and objectives focus on several areas including, but not limited to, human rights and social responsibility, safety of our employees, employee development and training, and operational execution. 9


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    • Human Rights: Select is committed to conducting business in a manner that respects all human rights. Select is committed to promoting and encouraging respect for people and fundamental freedoms for all without distinctions of any kind such as race, color, sex, language, religion, or political or other opinions. We are committed to partnering with personnel, business parties and other stakeholders directly linked to our operations that share our commitment to these same principles. We demonstrate this commitment in our employment practices, including through our Code of Conduct, our Equal Employment Opportunity Employer Policy, and our Anti-Harassment Policy, as well as through our policies on safety and security for our employees. Select supports diversity and inclusion by regularly reviewing its organizational culture with an eye towards instituting policies, procedures and practices to support such efforts. Additionally, our human resource department tracks and reviews metrics on the sex, age, and ethnicity of our employees to help ensure that current employees and prospective employees are treated fairly. Select provides several ways for individuals to raise concerns anonymously, including the 24-hour Employee Hotline, Whistleblower Hotline and Health Safety Security & Environment (“HSSE”) Hotline, which promotes quick and confidential remediation without fear of retaliation. • Safety: Select maintains a culture of safety, which we believe preserves the environment and our relationships with the communities in which we operate. We place a strong emphasis on the safe execution of our operations, including safety training for our employees and the development of a variety of safety programs designed to make us a market leader in safety standards and performance. In addition, our safety recognition program incentivizes employees throughout our organization to focus on conducting operations in accordance with our strict safety standards. Further, we work closely with federal, state, local and tribal governments and community organizations to help ensure that our operations comply with legal requirements and community standards. Lastly, when our employees identify a heightened safety risk, we respond quickly to mitigate the risk through communication, coordination and, if appropriate, a change in policy, procedures and training. We believe that our customers select their operational partners based in part on the quality of their safety and compliance records, and therefore, we will continue to make investments to be a market leader in this area. Select also empowers operational personnel with stop work authority (“SWA”) as a tool for helping ensure safety. Our SWA policy empowers our employees to stop work whenever they identify unsafe work conditions. When SWA is employed, operations cease until the risk is addressed and both the employee and management agree that it is safe to resume work. • COVID-19: To protect Select’s workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic, we have taken steps to support our people who are affected by the disease, manage work-from-home scheduling as appropriate, limit on-site visitors, and monitor and consistently communicate with those who are required to be at a work location, while also providing these employees with additional personal protective equipment. We empaneled a COVID-19 task force and created a COVID-19 rules of engagement instructional job aid that provides guidance on facemasks, social distancing, personal hygiene, engineering controls, administrative controls, specific rules for facilities and vehicles and a reporting mechanism. • Employee Development: Select encourages managers and supervisors at all levels to have frequent, open and constructive dialogue with their direct reports about job performance and performance improvement. In addition, managers and employees are directed to connect on employee well-being, performance, development and growth opportunities utilizing our informal feedback program in which twice a year, each of our employees answer four simple questions relating to their recent performance in relation to our core values and then have a one-on-one meeting with their direct supervisor to discuss such performance. With these and related practices, we strive for a culture of continuous improvement. During 2020, we had both mid-year and year-end employee performance improvement reviews with a completion rate of 93%, despite challenges related to the COVID-19 pandemic. • Operational Execution: It is critical that all Select employees that serve our customers are qualified and trained for their roles, understand our policies and work procedures, and receive the work direction necessary to operate safely. Site managers create daily, weekly and monthly plans for coordination of tasks and personnel. Our employees use standard operating procedures and best practices to standardize effective and consistent execution. Further, we employ a comprehensive mentor program, where more experienced employees provide guidance and instruction to less experienced employees and use videos to train and develop our operational personnel. Competitive Strengths We believe our ability to combine and integrate the complexities of our water and chemical-related services through both temporary, job-specific services and longer-term solutions that include investments in infrastructure gives 10


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    us a competitive advantage and is the foundation of our business. We believe our broad geographic footprint, comprehensive suite of water services, inventory of water sources, advanced technology and semi-permanent and permanent pipeline infrastructure position us to be a leading provider of water solutions in all of the oil and gas plays that we serve. We have well-established field operations in what we believe to be core areas of many of the most active shale plays, basins and regions in the U.S., including the Permian, Bakken, Eagle Ford, Haynesville, Marcellus, Utica, Rockies and Mid-Continent (“MidCon”) regions. Our broad footprint enables us to service the majority of current domestic unconventional drilling and completion activity. We estimate that over 80% of all currently active U.S. onshore horizontal rigs are operating in our primary service areas. We believe that the vast majority of rigs that will be deployed in the near- to medium-term will be situated in these areas. In particular, we have established a strong position in the Permian Basin, which is presently our largest operating region, accounting for approximately 46% of our revenue in 2020 and 47% of our revenue in 2019. Our Water Services segment focuses on supplying the services and customized, job-specific solutions needed as our customers’ completion activities move from location to location across the geographic footprint of their acreage over time. These services include the transportation, logistics and storage solutions needed to support the delivery of water to the wellsite for new well completions, the flowback and well testing services needed to manage the initial production phases of the well and the logistics services needed to manage the long-term produced water volumes associated with oil and gas production over the life of the well. We believe we are a market leader in providing comprehensive water- related services to the industry and we have dedicated significant resources to developing technology solutions to manage the needs of the increasingly complex needs of our customers across the water lifecycle. We have invested significantly in our patented WaterONE™ and AquaView® suite of proprietary hardware and software applications for measuring, monitoring and automating our water services throughout the well lifecycle. Our suite of automated solutions include automated water transfer pumps, manifolds, proportioning systems and telemetry meter trailers. WaterONE™ provides true automation to gather, analyze and act on data in real-time – all without human intervention – giving operators the ability to remotely set and maintain or improve the operational control of their frac and produced water-related requirements. When our monitoring systems detect that certain defined thresholds set by our customers are out of desired range, our equipment sends out an alert and then, through dynamic machine learning, takes action to keep operations running safely and smoothly. This can include actions such as raising a pump’s RPM to maintain desired flow rates, adjusting valves in a proportioning system to maintain the desired water quality in real time while blending fresh, brackish, produced or otherwise impaired water sources or shutting down the system and valves completely in the event of a detected failure. In addition to reducing the risk of spills and injuries, our automated operations increase efficiency across the water transfer supply chain, reducing the risk of pressure spikes and increasing associated fuel efficiency, thereby significantly reducing overall fuel emissions. Our automation capabilities provide a safer, more efficient and cost-effective transfer, treatment and containment of produced or other lower quality water sources. Within our AquaView® monitoring software systems, our solar-powered cellular and satellite-based remote- monitoring telemetry systems give our customers the ability to gain precise and accurate volumetric analyses of water sources and provide real-time data to our customers that is accessible 24/7 via computer, smart phone or tablet. Our Hydrographic Mapping Vessels (“HMVs”) use sonar, satellite, and compass technology to provide precise volumetric analyses of water sources. The HMVs are rapidly deployed, durable enough to handle flowback pits, and can navigate through tight spaces in natural ponds. Additionally, our AquaView® sensors give timely information about acid levels, water quality, temperature and flow rate to assure there is sufficient water at the right quality levels required by our customers and provide alarm notifications to prevent problems during the well completion. We believe that our investments in technology provide a significant competitive advantage for us relative to our smaller, regionally-focused competitors by delivering more reliable, efficient, and environmentally sound solutions, often at a lower overall cost. Our Water Infrastructure segment develops water sources and the associated semi-permanent and permanent pipeline infrastructure to both meet our customers’ needs for source water for new well completions as well as their requirements for the gathering of flowback and produced water for either recycling for reuse or disposal. We believe that investments in infrastructure that serve multiple customers, when underwritten by longer-term contracts, lowers the cost of development for our customers, while reducing the overall environmental footprint and impact on the local communities. Additionally, the development of water infrastructure networks to serve multiple customers can improve 11


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    the economics of produced water recycling and therefore reduce the demand for fresh water required in oil and gas operations while also reducing required disposal volumes. To meet the water demands of our customers, we have secured access to significant volumes of water in key unconventional development areas. Water sources are often difficult to locate, acquire and permit, particularly in the quantities and at the locations needed for multi-well pad development programs. We have secured permits or long-term access rights to more than two billion barrels of water annually from hundreds of sources, including surface, subsurface, municipal and industrial sources, including produced water. We have also invested in significant pipeline infrastructure to support the delivery of water from our water sources, consisting of over 1,300 miles of both above-ground and buried pipeline, including key systems in the Delaware Basin in New Mexico and Texas and the Bakken shale in the Williston Basin in North Dakota. We continue to focus our efforts on the development of non-potable sources as well as the infrastructure and solutions required for the treatment and reuse of produced water. We have developed and maintained extensive relationships with landowners as well as local, state, tribal and federal authorities to ensure that we can sustainably meet both the economic and operational needs of our customers while responding to the concerns of the local communities in which we operate. We believe that our extensive relationships and regulatory expertise will continue to constitute a competitive advantage in identifying and securing additional sources of water in a responsible and sustainable manner. Water is vital to the health, economic, and social well-being of the communities where we live and work. In support of industry-wide efforts to reduce the demand for fresh water for hydraulic fracturing, we have a dedicated team of specialists focused on developing and deploying innovative water treatment and reuse services for our customers. We strive to fully understand local water issues, and to develop sustainable solutions with a shared commitment to conservation. Working collaboratively with our customers, we are actively building recycling facilities in the Delaware and Midland basins and will continue to focus on recycling opportunities in all of the areas that we operate. Longer term, we believe our focus on commercialized solutions that connect multiple operators to strategic infrastructure that provides for greater use of treated produced water for new well completions will reduce the use of fresh water for hydraulic fracturing. By doing so, we also strive to both reduce the portion of produced water being reinjected into SWD’s over time and to reduce the industry’s need for fresh water. We believe that greater use of produced water to reduce fresh water consumption will require collaboration with all stakeholders as we together develop water infrastructure networks to meet the needs of multiple operators. In addition to investing in pipelines and related infrastructure, Select offers mechanical and chemical solutions for treatment of produced water, and other non-potable water sources customized for our E&P customers’ complex fracturing fluid systems. We believe our expertise in utilizing chemical technologies in the water reclamation and conditioning process, combined with our chemical expertise in fracturing fluid system design, gives us a competitive advantage. For example, we offer a wide spectrum of bacterial control, aeration, proportioning and recycling technologies to condition source water or reuse flowback and produced water for hydraulic fracturing. Additionally, we invest in gathering infrastructure to collect produced water, and we operate produced water disposal facilities in major U.S. shale plays with a permitted capacity of approximately 200,000 barrels/day (“bbl/d”) with an additional 850,000 bbl/d of permitted capacity available for development to support the disposal of produced water that cannot be reused for new well completions. This disposal capacity is critical to support reuse capabilities, as it provides an alternative outlet during times when limited completions activity in an area may not support additional water reuse demand. In short, Select intends to play an important role in the advancement of sustainable water solutions that are designed to align the needs of the oil and gas industry with the sustainability goals of all stakeholders. On November 1, 2017, the Company completed a merger with Rockwater (the “Rockwater Merger”) and the Oilfield Chemicals segment continues to operate primarily under our subsidiary, Rockwater Energy Solutions, LLC (“Rockwater LLC”). Our Oilfield Chemicals segment develops, manufactures and delivers a full suite of completion chemical products utilized in hydraulic fracturing, stimulation, cementing and related well completion processes. Our Completion Chemicals product lines support the fluid systems utilized primarily in the completion and development of unconventional resources. These products include polymers that create viscosity, crosslinkers, friction reducers, 12


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    surfactants, buffers, breakers and other chemical technologies, and are provided to leading pressure pumping service companies and E&P operators in the U.S. The use of automated communications systems combined with direct-to-wellsite delivery ensures seamless product availability for our customers, while our chemical expertise enables us to deliver a customized suite of products to meet customers’ technical and economical product needs. With our wide range of manufactured products and our expertise in fracturing chemistry, we believe we are well positioned to support our customers as fracturing chemistry evolves in the coming years in response to changes in technology and the evolution of frac water fluid systems. In addition to our chemical product offerings, we provide inventory management services, including procurement, warehousing and delivery services as well as a full suite of laboratory technologies and FluidMatch™ consultation services, including water analysis, quality control and assurance, additive compatibility analysis, solids analysis and stimulation recommendations. We have two primary manufacturing facilities in Texas, regional distribution centers and a logistics fleet supporting geographic regions in the Permian, MidCon, Bakken, Eagle Ford, Haynesville and Rockies. We introduced the first in-basin manufacturing facility of emulsion polymers (friction reducers) in our industry, strategically located in the Permian Basin, which provides the advantage of reducing our overall transportation costs of delivering finished goods to our customers within the basin. Our production chemicals solutions are used by oil and gas companies to enhance well performance and reduce production costs throughout the life of a well. Our complete line of production enhancement and treating chemicals includes demulsification products, clay stabilizers, paraffin treating chemicals, pour point depressants, corrosion inhibitors, scale inhibitors, scale solvents, H2S scavengers, water treating chemicals, and bactericides. Our production enhancement capabilities include both products and problem well analysis and consultation, and custom formulation is available for any treating requirement. Additionally, through our 2019 acquisition of a well chemical services business (“WCS”), we provide advanced water treatment solutions throughout the water lifecycle, as well as specialized stimulation flow assurance and integrity management, and post-treatment monitoring services. We deliver customized programs using proven chemical technologies and mobile equipment to treat virtually any oilfield water for reuse. Following our treatment applications, fluid samples are analyzed again to ensure the treatment is optimized to reduce overall chemical investment. We provide disinfection treatment with a smaller environmental footprint, lower power costs and manpower needs than alternative solutions. Our expertise allows us to advise our customers on the best economic and operational solutions to manage their water quality and chemical solutions needs across water qualities and fracturing fluid systems. As mentioned under “⸺Human Capital” above, we maintain a culture focused on safety. With approximately 2,000 employees and operations spanning the U.S., we believe our commitment to foster a culture of safety and corporate responsibility is essential. Our employee base is made up of dedicated operational and technical professionals, including many with advanced degrees, professional licenses and project development experience, and diverse backgrounds in geology, geography, land management, petroleum, chemical and electrical engineering, computer science, environmental science, geographic information systems and regulatory affairs. In addition, we emphasize preserving the environment and our relationships with the communities in which we operate. We work closely with federal, state, local and tribal governments and community organizations to help ensure that our operations comply with legal requirements and community standards. Further, we believe being a good corporate steward is strategic to our leadership in the oil and gas industry, and will better allow us to develop solutions that both address the needs of our customers and contribute to sustainable business practices. Our solutions significantly decrease the quantity of trucks on the road, thereby reducing fuel use and emissions and limiting the traffic footprint in the communities in which we operate. We believe that our customers will select their service providers based in part on the quality of their safety and compliance records and their ability to support their long-term Environmental, Social and Governance (“ESG”) goals and therefore, we will continue to make investments to be a market leader in these areas. Description of Business Segments We offer our services through the following three reportable segments: (i) Water Services, (ii) Water Infrastructure and (iii) Oilfield Chemicals. 13


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    Water Services Segment Our Water Services segment consists of our services businesses, including water transfer, flowback and well testing, fluids hauling, water containment and water network automation, primarily serving E&P companies. Additionally, this segment includes the operations of our accommodations and rentals business. • Water Transfer. We believe we are the largest provider of water transfer services to the industry. Our Water Transfer service line installs temporary above-ground pipeline systems that can be equipped with full automation to deliver water autonomously at high volumes and rates from a water source to water containment facilities (tanks and pits), or directly to the well. Our assets include more than 1,300 miles of layflat hose and temporary pipe and more than 1,000 high-rate water-transfer pumps and related equipment. We install layflat hose as part of a flexible water transfer solution that can be customized to fit a specific project. Our layflat hose allows for quick, cost-effective deployment and removal of transfer assets with limited environmental disturbance and can be quickly redeployed for new projects, including projects in different geographic regions. Layflat hose has a significantly lower risk of spills than most other types of temporary jointed pipe as a result of the strength and durability of the hose as well as the secure nature of any coupling joints used to connect multiple sections of hose. Our layflat hose consists primarily of 10-inch and 12-inch diameter segments. Depending on the requirements of a project, layflat hose may run from a water source directly to a containment area, such as an above-ground pit or storage tank, or to a wellsite. Water can also be transferred from one containment area to another as part of managing a larger supply network. Our customers generally prefer layflat hose to alternative temporary piping options due to the cost-effectiveness, limited environmental impact, customizability and reduced risk of spills. o Water Network Automation. Our proprietary and industry leading automation technologies provide integrated water transfer solutions with automated pump operation, automated valve control, automated blending and proportioning capabilities, automated manifolds, level monitoring and data collection with analytics. We are able to provide our customers with increased visibility into their water inventories and usage, improving their efficiency and decreasing their costs. Our technology also provides us with the unique ability to detect potential issues and prevent them from occurring, as well as to reduce manpower and equipment on certain jobs, in turn mitigating safety and environmental risks while reducing overall fuel emissions. • Flowback and Well Testing. Our flowback and well testing services add value for our customers by providing well productivity data associated with our services, which include fracturing support, fracturing plug drill out, flaring operations, ventless flowback operations, sand management and production testing. We believe we are one of the largest providers of flowback and well testing services to the U.S. land industry and we are a seasoned operator within Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) emissions regulations, offering green completions through our mobile production facilities and electronic iron certifications through our proprietary Radio Frequency Identification System (“RFID”) system. Our green completions services utilize specialized, closed-loop tank ventilation combustion units that prevent the release of methane and vapors into the air during operations. This process safely contains and combusts flare gas, reducing the amount of emissions at the wellsite, going well beyond current EPA emissions regulations. These services require highly-trained personnel that specialize in our cutting-edge technologies and equipment. To support these specialized services, our in-house, state-of-the-art well testing training facility provides hands-on, field-simulated stimulation training with our equipment in a controlled environment, reducing the potential for training errors and related safety incidents. Our specialized well testing equipment is outfitted with pressure transducers, Coriolis meters, and guided wave radars for efficient and accurate testing. Using our online reporting system, our customers can view real-time data for well pressures, differentials, and fluid levels. This allows for immediate changes to be made during production, better optimizing oil and gas production, reducing oil and gas reservoir damage and enabling operators to 14


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    quantify oil and gas reserves more effectively. Our traditional well testing and hydraulic equipment is also deployable in an extensive range of operational conditions: high and low temperature, high and low pressure, high hydrogen sulfide concentration, and high volume. • Water Containment. We believe we are the largest provider of high -capacity aboveground water storage tanks (“ASTs”) in the U.S. We offer ASTs ranging in size from 4,500 to 60,000 barrels per tank, with remote monitoring capability in every major U.S. basin. Our ASTs provide a low-cost containment alternative to fracturing tanks. ASTs can be set up as part of our Water Treatment and Recycling service offerings, which can be bundled with our Water Transfer services. A 40,000 barrel AST can be delivered by three trucks and installed in one day, replacing the equivalent of eighty 500-barrel fracturing tanks and the associated truck traffic and emissions from the transportation of those fracturing tanks. Our modular tank design allows for twenty different tank configurations to meet each customer’s individual needs. We can also offer nested tanks for complete secondary containment. • Fluids Hauling. Our Fluids Hauling group operates as Tidal Logistics Inc. (“Tidal Logistics”), our subsidiary. This business transports and stores water and various drilling, completion, and production fluids, utilizing our fleet of vacuum, winch and hydrovac trucks and related assets, such as fracturing tanks. Currently, we own and lease approximately 200 tractor trailers and body load trucks with operations across the Permian, MidCon, Eagle Ford, Haynesville, and Rockies regions. • Water Monitoring. Our Water Monitoring services support the full scope of our Water Services offerings and include hydrographic mapping services, remote pit and tank monitoring, generator monitoring, leak detection and automation-equipment monitoring services, including transfer pumps, manifolds, blending and proportioning systems and telemetry meter trailers. These services securely track water assets and measure information such as flow rates, temperature, pressure and water qualities such as acidity and salinity, providing real-time data through our customized portals and alert systems which are accessible 24/7 via computer, smart phone or tablet. • Accommodations and Rentals. Our accommodations and rentals service line, operating under our subsidiary, Peak Oilfield Services, LLC, provides workforce accommodations and surface rental equipment supporting drilling, completion and production operations in the U.S. onshore oil and gas industry. The services provided include fully furnished office and living quarters, freshwater supply and wastewater removal, portable power generation and light plants, internet, phone, intercom, surveillance and monitoring services and other long-term rentals supporting field personnel. Water Services Geographic Areas of Operation We provide our Water Services offerings in most of the major unconventional shale plays in the continental U.S., as illustrated by a “✓” in the chart below. Geographic Region Marcellus / Services Provided Permian MidCon Bakken Eagle Ford Utica HaynesvilleRockies Water Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Flowback and Well Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ ✓ — ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Water Containment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Fluids Hauling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ ✓ — ✓ — ✓ ✓ Water Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Accommodations and Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ ✓ — ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ 15


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    Water Services Customers Our Water Services customers primarily include major integrated and independent U.S. and international oil and gas producers. Water Services Competition Our industry is highly competitive. Our customers typically award contracts after a competitive bidding process. Operational track record, the skill and competency of our people, pricing, safety, technology and environmental performance are key factors in the bid evaluation. Equipment availability, location, service breadth and technical specifications can also be significant considerations. Certain large domestic and international oilfield services companies offer some water-oriented and environmental services, though these are generally ancillary to their core businesses. As a result, the water solutions industry is highly fragmented and our main competitors are typically smaller and often private service providers that focus on water solutions and logistical services across a narrow geographic area or service offering. We seek to differentiate ourselves from our competitors by delivering comprehensive, high-quality services and equipment, coupled with well-trained people and a commitment to superior execution and a safe working environment. Water Infrastructure Segment Our Water Infrastructure segment is operated primarily under our subsidiary, Select Energy Services, LLC (“Select LLC”), and provides water sourcing, recycling, gathering, transferring and disposal of water. Water Infrastructure operations are provided through or enabled by a network of permanent pipeline infrastructure, semi- permanent pipeline infrastructure, earthen pits, water sources and SWDs. Water Infrastructure Service Lines Our Water Infrastructure segment is divided into the following service lines: • Water Sourcing. Our Water Sourcing service line provides water, permitting and, in some instances, necessary logistics required by our E&P customers to support their drilling and completion operations. Our sourcing efforts include identifying, developing and obtaining the right to use water from a variety of sources, including surface, subsurface, industrial, municipal and produced water. Through a portfolio of contracts with and permits from regulatory bodies, corporations and individual landowners, we have secured rights in excess of two billion barrels of water annually from hundreds of strategically-located sources. o Water Treatment & Recycling. Our Water Treatment & Recycling business provides tailored solutions to fit specific customer water quality and delivery needs. We utilize both standard and proprietary processes and technology, including mechanical and chemical technologies, that provide high-quality, large volume throughput and cost- optimized solutions for our E&P customers. These solutions are largely designed for the recycling and reuse of flowback and produced water to meet a customer’s well completion water needs. We provide our customers with high-quality completion water volumes while reducing the need to source fresh water as well as reducing the need for disposal into SWDs. Our recycling operations consist of temporary, semi-permanent and permanent infrastructure, including above-ground and in-ground containment along with treatment processing assets and facilities, capable of recycling large volumes of produced water for reuse in the hydraulic fracturing process. • Pipelines & Logistics. We have developed some of our larger, strategic water sources into comprehensive, permanent pipeline systems designed to provide water used for drilling, completion and production activity across a wide geography. In many instances, we also provide the associated logistics needed to deliver the water directly to our customers’ wellsites. We have 16


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    developed pipeline systems in the Northern Delaware Basin of the Permian Basin in Texas and New Mexico, the Bakken in North Dakota and the Haynesville in northern Louisiana. o Permian: We have significant Permian Basin infrastructure, primarily in the Northern Delaware Basin in New Mexico, but also in the Southern Delaware Basin and the Midland Basin in Texas. The acquisition in March 2017 of Gregory Rockhouse Ranch, Inc. (the “GRR Acquisition”) and certain other affiliated entities and assets (collectively, the “GRR Entities”), added a vast array of brackish and effluent water sources and significant water transport infrastructure, including over 1,000 miles of temporary and permanent pipeline infrastructure and related storage facilities and pumps, all located in the Northern Delaware Basin portion of the Permian Basin. In 2019, we expanded our Northern Delaware Basin water infrastructure with the construction of a large diameter, 40-mile pipeline system that delivers drilling and completion water required by our customers in New Mexico’s Lea and Eddy Counties, as well as provides the ability to transport produced water resulting from oil and gas production to recycling facilities or to disposal wells. This new system expansion is supported by a five-year take-or-pay contract with a major international integrated oil company for the purchase and delivery of 75 million barrels of water in total beginning in December 2019. o Bakken: We have three permits that enable us to withdraw up to 192 million barrels of water annually from the Missouri River and Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota. Water access cannot be easily replicated on Lake Sakakawea today as there are multiple environmental and regulatory conditions that must be met before an industrial water intake location can be built. New permits will also not be granted within 25 miles of an intake location associated with an existing permit. We have three of the five existing permits off Lake Sakakawea. To develop these water rights, we constructed, own and operate two large diameter pipeline systems that provide drilling and completion water to support oil and gas activity in McKenzie County, North Dakota. These two systems consist of pump stations and approximately 88 miles of underground pipe, of which we own 38 miles and have contractual rights to access the remaining 50 miles. We are evaluating the development of a third pipeline system that would serve Williams County and western Mountrail County. The development of the third permit would allow us to better utilize our full annual allotment of water across the three pipeline systems. • Fluid Disposal. We currently operate eight SWDs with total daily maximum permitted disposal capacity of approximately 200,000 bpd. Our active SWDs are located in the Eagle Ford (4), Permian (1), Haynesville (1), MidCon (1) and Rockies (1) regions. Additionally, we have over 850,000 bpd of additional permitted, undeveloped disposal capacity as well as a significant backlog of pending permits. We dispose of both flowback water produced from hydraulic fracturing operations as well as naturally-occurring produced water that is extracted during the oil and natural gas production process. Volumes are transported to our SWDs for disposal by means of both owned and third-party gathering pipelines, as well as through owned and third-party fluid- hauling trucks. 17


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    Water Infrastructure Geographic Areas of Operation We provide our Water Infrastructure offerings in most of the major unconventional shale plays in the continental U.S., as illustrated by a “✓” in the chart below. Geographic Region Marcellus / Services Provided Permian MidCon Bakken Eagle Ford Utica HaynesvilleRockies Water Sourcing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Pipelines Systems & Associated Logistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ — ✓ — — ✓ — Fluid Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ ✓ — ✓ — ✓ ✓ Water Infrastructure Customers Our Water Infrastructure customers primarily include major integrated and independent U.S. and international oil and gas producers. Water Infrastructure Competition Our industry is highly competitive. Our customers typically award contracts after a competitive bidding process. Track record, the skill and competency of our people, pricing, safety and environmental performance and location and are key factors in the bid evaluation. Equipment availability, location, and technical specifications can also be significant considerations. While a significant portion of our work is awarded on a short term basis, we have a successful track record of utilizing our infrastructure to obtain various long term contracts such as areas-of-mutual- interest, acreage dedications, well bore dedications and take-or-pay agreements. Certain large midstream companies offer some water-oriented and infrastructure services, though these are generally ancillary to their core businesses of gathering and transporting oil and gas volumes. Additionally, certain of our customers have invested in water infrastructure for their own operations. As a result, the water infrastructure competitive landscape is highly fragmented and our main competitors, aside from oil and gas companies, are typically private water midstream companies and smaller water service providers that focus on a more limited geographic area or service offering. We seek to differentiate ourselves from our competitors through our expansive scale and by delivering high-quality solutions, coupled with extensive regulatory expertise, well-trained people and a commitment to superior execution and a safe working environment. Additionally, we believe our ability to couple our water infrastructure with our water services and oilfield chemicals expertise provides an advantage relative to our competition. Oilfield Chemicals Segment Our Oilfield Chemicals segment is operated primarily under our subsidiary, Rockwater LLC. We develop, manufacture and provide a full suite of completion and production chemical products utilized in hydraulic fracturing, stimulation, cementing and related well completion processes. We sell completion chemicals primarily to leading pressure-pumping service companies and E&P operators in the U.S. Our production chemicals are used by oil and gas companies to enhance well performance and reduce production costs throughout the life of a well. Our well chemical services service line provides customized water treatment and flow assurance solutions to our customers. 18


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    Oilfield Chemicals Service Lines Our Oilfield Chemicals segment is divided into the following services lines: • Completion Chemicals. Through our Completion Chemicals service line we develop, manufacture and provide a full suite of chemicals utilized in hydraulic fracturing, stimulation and cementing, including polymers that create viscosity, crosslinkers, friction reducers, surfactants, buffers, breakers and other chemical technologies. Our product lines support the three major types of well completions used in shale oil and gas development today (cross-linked gel frac, linear fracs and slickwater fracs). We can provide 24/7/365 time-critical logistical support to our customers. Our warehousing and service includes inventory management with computerized tracking and monthly reporting. We use automated communications systems combined with direct-to-wellsite delivery to ensure seamless product availability for our customers. With our expertise in fracturing chemistry, we can develop customized products to meet customers’ frac-fluid system requirements. We have one primary manufacturing facility in the Permian Basin of Texas, four regional distribution centers, approximately 35 heavy chemical transport trucks and approximately 221 on-site storage and transport trailers. • Production Chemicals. Through our Production Chemicals service line, we help our customers analyze well performance issues and develop engineered chemical solutions to enhance production and well performance and reduce production costs. We have one primary manufacturing facility in the Permian Basin in Texas. We serve the Permian, Eagle Ford, MidCon and Rockies markets and we offer analytical services as well as lab and field support through 15 field locations. Our products include production- enhancing chemicals, ancillary oilfield services, including corrosion and scale monitoring, chemical inventory management, well failure analysis, and lab services. In the Permian, our centrally located lab provides complete water and bacteria analysis through the well lifecycle beginning with fracturing water through the production cycle. Our strategy is to provide basin -specific production chemicals solutions that lower our customers’ costs and increase their production. Our products help our customers mitigate scaling, corrosion, hydrogen sulfide and paraffin build-up problems. This service line allows us to help our customers manage well performance and costs over the lifecycle of a well. We believe our Production Chemicals service line complements our Water Services and Water Infrastructure segments by expanding our relationships with key customers and pulling through other services. Our Production Chemicals business works closely with our Completions Chemicals service line, for example, when advising customers on the fluid systems best suited for a particular well when it transitions from completion to production. • Well Chemical Services. Through our Well Chemical Services service line, we provide advanced water treatment solutions throughout the water lifecycle, as well as specialized stimulation flow assurance and integrity management, and post-treatment monitoring services in the U.S. land market. Our chemical experts provide pre-treatment water sampling, analysis and testing to determine a water’s chemistry, then design the most effective fracturing fluid system. The WCS team delivers customized programs using proven chemical technologies and mobile equipment to treat virtually any oilfield water for reuse. Following our treatment applications, fluid samples are analyzed again to ensure the treatment is optimized to reduce overall chemical investment. WCS provides disinfection treatment based on proven chlorine dioxide (ClO2) technology, with a smaller environmental footprint, lower power costs and manpower needs than alternative solutions. This service neutralizes microorganisms, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), iron sulfide, phenols, mercaptans, and polymers in the surface water. Our highly mobile solids removal units offer a flexible, economic solution compared to permanently installed equipment, which may not be ideal for every application. These units, which can treat up to 10,000 barrels of water per day, are simple to set up, have low energy consumption rates, and have a small operating footprint, making them suitable for nearly any wellsite. WCS provides optimized flow assurance solutions through patented solid inhibitors, which prevent downhole deposition and tubular damage while increasing production and decreasing non- productive time. These products inhibit scale, paraffin, asphaltenes, iron sulfide and salt while also 19


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    counteracting bacteria and corrosion. Our WCS team works closely with both our Completions Chemicals and Production Chemicals service lines as well as our water treatment and recycling teams within our Water Services and Water Infrastructure segments to advise our customers on the best economic and operational solutions to manage their water quality and chemical solutions needs. Oilfield Chemicals Geographic Areas of Operation We provide Oilfield Chemicals services in most of the major unconventional shale plays in the continental U.S. In the chart below, a “✓” indicates that we offer the service line in the indicated geographic region. Geographic Region Services Provided Permian MidCon Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Rockies Completion Chemicals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Production Chemicals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ ✓ — ✓ ✓ — Well Chemical Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ — ✓ Oilfield Chemicals Customers Our Oilfield Chemicals customers primarily include pressure pumpers, along with major integrated and independent U.S. and international oil and gas producers. Oilfield Chemicals Competition The Oilfield Chemicals business is highly competitive. Our competitors include both large manufacturers and companies that are pure distributors of commodities and specialty chemicals. We believe that the principal competitive factors in the markets we serve are technical expertise, manufacturing capacity, workforce competency, efficiency, safety record, reputation, experience and price. Additionally, projects are often awarded on a bid basis, which tends to create a highly competitive environment. We seek to differentiate ourselves from our competitors by delivering high-quality services and solutions, coupled with superior execution and operating efficiency in a safe working environment. Additionally, many of our competitors focus on serving multiple industries outside of oil and gas, and therefore we believe our dedicated focus on the oil and gas industry and in-basin manufacturing capabilities provides a competitive advantage. We also believe our expertise in water management provides a competitive advantage that allows us to assess and optimize our chemical solutions in a unique manner. Significant Customers There were no customers that accounted for 10% or more of our consolidated revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020. Sales and Marketing We direct our sales activities through a network of sales representatives and business development personnel, which allows us to support our customers at both the corporate and field level. Our sales representatives work closely with local operations managers to target potential opportunities through strategic focus and regular customer interaction. We track the drilling and completion activities of our current and potential new customers. Our operations managers meet with our sales team several times a week, and monitor sales activity via daily reporting. To support our sales strategy, we have developed a proprietary database that integrates market information such as current rig, fracturing crew and permit activity and the location of our strategic water sources. Our marketing activities are performed by an internal marketing group with input from key executives. We intend to build and maintain a well-recognized brand in the oil and gas industry through multiple media outlets including 20


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    our website, blog and social media accounts, radio, print and billboard advertisements, and various industry-specific conferences, publications and lectures. Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Matters Our water-related operations in support of oil and gas exploration, development and production activities pursued by our customers are subject to stringent and comprehensive federal, state, provincial and local laws and regulations in the U.S. governing occupational safety and health, the discharge of materials into the environment and environmental protection. Numerous governmental entities, including the EPA, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) and analogous state agencies, have the power to enforce compliance with these laws and regulations and the permits issued under them, often requiring difficult and costly actions. These laws and regulations may, among other things (i) require the acquisition of permits to take fresh water from surface water and groundwater, construct pipelines or containment facilities, drill wells and other regulated activities; (ii) restrict the types, quantities and concentration of various substances that can be released into the environment or injected into non-producing belowground formations; (iii) limit or prohibit our operations on certain lands lying within wilderness, wetlands and other protected areas; (iv) require remedial measures to mitigate pollution from former and ongoing operations; (v) impose specific safety and health criteria addressing worker protection; and (vi) impose substantial liabilities for pollution resulting from our operations. Any failure to comply with these laws and regulations may result in the assessment of sanctions, including administrative, civil and criminal penalties, the imposition of investigatory, remedial or corrective action obligations or the incurrence of capital expenditures; the occurrence of restrictions, delays or cancellations in the permitting, performance or expansion of projects; and the issuance of orders enjoining performance of some or all of our operations in a particular area. Our business activities present risks of incurring significant environmental costs and liabilities, including costs and liabilities resulting from our handling of oilfield and other wastes, because of air emissions and wastewater discharges related to our operations, and due to historical oilfield industry operations and waste disposal practices. Our businesses include the operation of oilfield waste disposal injection wells that pose risks of environmental liability, including leakage from the wells to surface or subsurface soils, surface water or groundwater. In addition, private parties, including the owners of properties upon which we perform services and facilities where our wastes are taken for reclamation or disposal, also may have the right to pursue legal actions to enforce compliance as well as to seek damages for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations or for personal injury or property or natural resource damages. Some environmental laws and regulations may impose strict liability, which means that in some situations we could be exposed to liability as a result of our conduct that was lawful at the time it occurred or the conduct of, or conditions caused by, prior operators or other third parties. Remedial costs and other damages arising as a result of environmental laws and costs associated with changes in environmental laws and regulations could be substantial and could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity, results of operations and financial condition. The trend in U.S. environmental regulation, which regulation is expected to be bolstered by the recent change in presidential administration, is typically to place more restrictions and limitations on activities that may affect the environment, and thus any new laws and regulations, amendment of existing laws and regulations, reinterpretation of legal requirements or increased governmental enforcement that result in more stringent and costly construction, completion or water-management activities, or waste handling, storage transport, disposal, or remediation requirements could have a material adverse effect on our financial position and results of operations. We may be unable to pass on such increased compliance costs to our customers. Moreover, accidental releases or spills may occur in the course of our operations, and we cannot assure you that we will not incur significant costs and liabilities as a result of such releases or spills, including any third-party claims for damage to property, natural resources or persons. Historically, our environmental compliance costs in the U.S. have not had a material adverse effect on our results of operations; however, there can be no assurance that such costs will not be material in the future or that such future compliance will not have a material adverse effect on our business and operational results. Our customers may also incur increased costs or restrictions, delays or cancellations in permitting or operating activities as a result of more stringent environmental laws and regulations, which may result in a curtailment of exploration, development or production activities that would reduce the demand for our services. 21


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    The following is a summary of the more significant existing environmental and occupational safety and health laws in the U.S., as amended from time to time, to which our operations are subject and for which compliance may have a material adverse impact on our capital expenditures, results of operations or financial position. Hazardous substances and wastes. The federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (“RCRA”), and comparable state statutes regulate the generation, transportation, treatment, storage, disposal and cleanup of hazardous and non-hazardous wastes. Pursuant to rules issued by the EPA, the individual states administer some or all of the provisions of RCRA, sometimes in conjunction with their own, more stringent requirements. Drilling fluids, produced waters, and most of the other wastes associated with the exploration, development, and production of oil or gas, if properly handled, are currently exempt from regulation as hazardous waste under RCRA, and instead are regulated under RCRA’s less stringent non -hazardous waste provisions, state laws or other federal laws. However, it is possible that certain oil and gas drilling and production wastes now classified as non-hazardous could be classified as hazardous wastes in the future. Any loss of the RCRA exclusion for drilling fluids, produced waters and related wastes could result in an increase in our and our oil and gas producing customers’ costs to manage and dispose of generated wastes, which could have a material adverse effect on our and our customers’ results of operations and financial position. In the course of our operations, we generate some amounts of ordinary industrial wastes, such as paint wastes, waste solvents and waste oils that may be regulated as hazardous wastes. Wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (“NORM”) may also be generated in connection with our operations. Certain processes used to produce oil and gas may enhance the radioactivity of NORM, which may be present in oilfield wastes. NORM is subject primarily to individual state radiation control regulations. In addition, NORM handling and management activities are governed by regulations promulgated by the OSHA. These state and OSHA regulations impose certain requirements concerning worker protection, the treatment, storage and disposal of NORM waste, the management of waste piles, containers and tanks containing NORM, as well as restrictions on the uses of land with NORM contamination. The federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (“CERCLA”), also known as the Superfund law, and comparable state laws impose liability, without regard to fault or legality of conduct, on classes of persons considered to be responsible for the release of a “hazardous substance” into the environment. These persons include the current and past owner or operator of the site where the hazardous substance release occurred and anyone who disposed or arranged for the disposal of a hazardous substance released at the site. Under CERCLA, such persons may be subject to joint and several, strict liability for the costs of cleaning up the hazardous substances that have been released into the environment, for damages to natural resources and for the costs of certain health studies. CERCLA also authorizes the EPA and, in some instances, third parties to act in response to threats to the public health or the environment and to seek to recover from the responsible classes of persons the costs they incur. In addition, neighboring landowners and other third parties may file claims for personal injury and property damage allegedly caused by the hazardous substances released into the environment. We generate materials in the course of our operations that may be regulated as hazardous substances. We currently own, lease, or operate numerous properties that have been used for activities supporting oil and gas exploration, development and production for a number of years. Although we believe that we have utilized operating and waste disposal practices that were standard in the industry at the time, hazardous substances, wastes, or petroleum hydrocarbons may have been released on, under or from the properties owned or leased by us, or on, under or from other locations, including off-site locations, where we conduct services for our customers or where such substances have been taken for treatment or disposal. In addition, some of our properties have been operated by third parties or by previous owners or operators whose treatment and disposal of hazardous substances, wastes, or petroleum hydrocarbons was not under our control. These properties and the substances disposed or released on, under or from them may be subject to CERCLA, RCRA and analogous state laws. Under such laws, we could be required to undertake response actions or corrective measures, which could include removal of previously disposed substances and wastes, cleanup of contaminated property or performance of remedial operations to prevent future contamination, the costs of which could be material. Water discharges and use. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, also known as the Clean Water Act (“CWA”), and analogous state laws, impose restrictions and strict controls with respect to the discharge of pollutants, 22


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    including spills and leaks of oil and hazardous substances, into state waters and waters of the U.S. The discharge of pollutants into regulated waters is prohibited, except in accordance with the terms of a permit issued by the EPA or an analogous state agency. Spill prevention, control and countermeasure plan requirements imposed under the CWA require appropriate containment berms and similar structures to help prevent the contamination of navigable waters in the event of a petroleum hydrocarbon tank spill, rupture or leak. In addition, the CWA and analogous state laws require individual permits or coverage under general permits for discharges of stormwater runoff from certain types of facilities. The CWA also prohibits the discharge of dredge and fill material in regulated waters, including wetlands, unless authorized by permit. In 2015, the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (the “Corps”) under the Obama Administration published a final rule that would significantly expand the scope of the CWA’s jurisdiction over waters of the U.S. However, the EPA and the Corps under the Trump Administration issued a final rule, made effective in December 2019, that repealed the 2015 rule and they also published a final rule in April 2020 re-defining the term “waters of the United States” as applied under the Clean Water Act and narrowing the scope of waters subject to federal regulation. The April 2020 final rule is subject to various pending legal challenges; moreover, there is an expectation that the Biden Administration will review and may reconsider this April 2020 final rule. If the EPA and the Corps under the Biden Administration revises the April 2020 final rule in a manner similar to or more stringent than the original 2015 final rule, or if any challenge to the April 2020 final rule is successful, the scope of the CWA’s jurisdiction in areas where we or our customers conduct operations could again be expanded. Any such developments could delay, restrict or halt permitting or development of projects, result in longer permitting timelines, or increased compliance expenditures or mitigation costs for our and our oil and natural gas customers’ operations. These results may consequently reduce the rate of production of natural gas or crude oil from operators with whom we have a business relationship and, in turn, have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and cash flows. Federal and state regulatory agencies can impose administrative, civil and criminal penalties for non-compliance with discharge permits or other requirements of the CWA and analogous state laws and regulations. The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (“OPA”) amends the CWA and sets minimum standards for prevention, containment and cleanup of oil spills in waters of the U.S. The OPA applies to vessels, offshore facilities, and onshore facilities, including E&P facilities that may affect waters of the U.S. Under OPA, responsible parties including owners and operators of onshore facilities may be held strictly liable for oil cleanup costs and natural resource damages as well as a variety of public and private damages that may result from oil spills. The OPA also currently limits the liability of a responsible party for economic damages, excluding all oil spill response costs, to $137.7 million; although this limit does not apply if the spill was caused by gross negligence or willful misconduct, resulted from violation of a federal safety, construction or operating regulation, or if the party failed to report a spill or cooperate fully in the cleanup. The OPA also requires owners or operators of certain onshore facilities to prepare Facility Response Plans for responding to a worst-case discharge of oil into waters of the U.S. Saltwater disposal wells and induced seismicity. Saltwater disposal via underground injection is regulated pursuant to the Underground Injection Control (“UIC”) program established under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act (the “SDWA”) and analogous state and local laws and regulations. The UIC program includes requirements for permitting, testing, monitoring, recordkeeping and reporting of injection well activities, as well as a prohibition against the migration of fluid containing any contaminant into underground sources of drinking water. State regulations require a permit from the applicable regulatory agencies to operate underground injection wells. Although we monitor the injection process of our wells, any leakage from the subsurface portions of the injection wells could cause degradation of fresh groundwater resources, potentially resulting in suspension of our UIC permit, issuance of fines and penalties from governmental agencies, incurrence of expenditures for remediation of the affected resource and imposition of liability by third-parties claiming damages for alternative water supplies, property and personal injuries. A change in UIC disposal well regulations or the inability to obtain permits for new disposal wells in the future may affect our ability to dispose of produced waters and other substances, which could affect our business. Furthermore, in response to seismic events in the past several years near underground disposal wells used for the disposal by injection of produced water resulting from oil and gas activities, federal and some state agencies are investigating whether such wells have caused increased seismic activity, and some states have restricted, suspended or shut down the use of such disposal wells. Developing research suggests that the link between seismic activity and wastewater disposal may vary by region and that only a very small fraction of the tens of thousands of injection wells 23


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    have been suspected to be, or have been, the likely cause of induced seismicity. In 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey identified six states with the most significant hazards from induced seismicity, including Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, Colorado, New Mexico and Arkansas. In response to these concerns, regulators in some states have imposed, or are considering imposing, additional requirements in the permitting of produced water disposal wells or otherwise to assess any relationship between seismicity and the use of such wells. For example, Oklahoma has issued rules for wastewater disposal wells that imposed certain permitting and operating restrictions and reporting requirements on disposal wells in proximity to faults and also, from time to time, has developed and implemented plans directing certain wells where seismic incidents have occurred to restrict or suspend disposal well operations. In particular, the Oklahoma Corporation Commission released well completions seismicity guidelines in late 2016 for operators in the SCOOP and STACK that call for hydraulic fracturing operations to be suspended following earthquakes of certain magnitudes in the vicinity. The Texas Railroad Commission adopted similar rules in Texas. In addition, the Oklahoma Corporation Commission’s Oil and Gas Conservation Division has, from time to time, issued orders limiting future increases in the volume of oil and gas wastewater injected below ground into the Arbuckle formation in an effort to reduce the number of earthquakes in the state. An additional consequence of this seismic activity is lawsuits alleging that disposal well operations have caused damage to neighboring properties or otherwise violated state and federal rules regulating waste disposal. The adoption and implementation of any new laws, regulations or directives that restrict our ability to dispose of wastewater gathered from our customers by limiting volumes, disposal rates, disposal well locations or otherwise, or requiring us to shut down disposal wells, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. Hydraulic fracturing activities. Hydraulic fracturing involves the injection of water, sand or other proppants and chemical additives under pressure into targeted geological formations to fracture the surrounding rock and stimulate production. Hydraulic fracturing is an important and common practice that is typically regulated by state oil and natural gas commissions or similar agencies. However, the practice continues to be controversial in certain parts of the country, resulting in increased scrutiny and regulation of the hydraulic fracturing process, including by federal agencies that have asserted regulatory authority or pursued investigations over certain aspects of the hydraulic fracturing process. For example, the EPA has asserted regulatory authority pursuant to the SDWA UIC program over hydraulic fracturing activities involving the use of diesel and issued guidance covering such activities, as well as published an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding Toxic Substances Control Act (“TSCA”) reporting of the chemical substances and mixtures used in hydraulic fracturing. Additionally, the EPA published an effluent limit guideline final rule prohibiting the discharge of wastewater from onshore unconventional oil and gas extraction facilities to publicly owned wastewater treatment plants. Moreover, in 2016, the federal Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”) under the Obama Administration published a final rule imposing more stringent standards on hydraulic fracturing activities on federal lands, including requirements for chemical disclosure, well bore integrity, and handling of flowback water. However, in late 2018, the BLM under the Trump Administration published a final rule rescinding the 2016 final rule. Litigation challenging the BLM’s 2016 final rule as well as its 2018 final rule rescinding the 2016 rule has been pursued by various states and industry and environmental groups. While a California federal court vacated the 2018 final rule in July 2020, a Wyoming federal court subsequently vacated the 2016 final rule in October 2020 and, accordingly, the 2016 final rule is no longer in effect but the Wyoming decision is expected to be appealed. Moreover, it is expected that the BLM under the Biden Administration will seek to pursue regulatory initiatives that regulate hydraulic fracturing activities on federal lands. Also, in late 2016, the EPA released its final report on the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources, concluding that “water cycle” activities associated with hydraulic fracturing may impact drinking water resources under some circumstances. While the U.S. Congress has from time to time considered but refused to adopt federal regulation of hydraulic fracturing, with President Biden taking office and the shift in party control of the U.S. Senate in January 2021, there is a possibility that a Biden Administration will pursue such legislation. In addition to proposed revisions of existing laws and regulations, President Biden has issued, and may continue to issue, executive orders that reflect a regulatory agenda targeting the industry’s hydraulic fracturing activities. Moreover, some state and local governments have adopted, and other governmental entities are considering adopting, regulations that could impose more stringent permitting, disclosure and well-construction requirements on hydraulic fracturing operations, including states where we or our customers 24


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    operate. For example, Texas, Oklahoma, California, Ohio, Pennsylvania and North Dakota, among others, have adopted regulations that impose stringent permitting, disclosure, disposal and well-construction requirements on hydraulic fracturing operations. States could also elect to place certain prohibitions on hydraulic fracturing. In addition to state laws, local land use restrictions, such as city ordinances, may restrict drilling in general and/or hydraulic fracturing in particular, as certain local governments in California have done. Other states, such as Texas, Oklahoma and Ohio have taken steps to limit the authority of local governments to regulate oil and gas development. In the event that new federal, state or local restrictions or bans on the hydraulic fracturing process are adopted in areas where we or our customers conduct business, we or our customers may incur additional costs or permitting requirements to comply with such requirements that may be significant in nature and our customers could experience added restrictions, delays or cancellations in their exploration, development, or production activities, which would in turn reduce the demand for our services and have a material adverse effect on our liquidity, consolidated results of operations, and consolidated financial condition. Air Emissions. The U.S. Clean Air Act (“CAA”) and comparable state laws restrict the emission of air pollutants from many sources through air emissions standards, construction and operating permit programs and the imposition of other compliance standards. These laws and regulations may require us to obtain pre-approval for the construction or modification of certain projects or facilities expected to produce or significantly increase air emissions, obtain and strictly comply with stringent air permit requirements or utilize specific equipment or technologies to control emissions of certain pollutants. The need to obtain permits has the potential to delay our projects as well as our customers’ development of oil and gas projects. Over the next several years, we or our customers may incur certain capital expenditures for air pollution control equipment or other air emissions-related issues. For example, in 2015, the EPA issued a final rule under the CAA, making the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (“NAAQS”) for ground-level ozone more stringent. Since that time, the EPA has issued attainment/nonattainment designations and, more recently in August 2020, the EPA under the Trump Administration published notice of a proposed action that, upon conducting a periodic review of the ozone standard in accord with CAA requirements, elected to retain the 2015 ozone NAAQS without revision on a going-forward basis. State implementation of the revised NAAQS could also result in the imposition of more stringent requirements. Compliance with the NAAQS requirements or other air pollution control and permitting requirements has the potential to delay the development of oil and gas projects and increase our or our customers’ costs of development and production, which costs could reduce demand for our services and have a material adverse impact on our business and results of operations. Climate Change. The threat of climate change continues to attract considerable attention from the public and policymakers in the United States and around the world. As a result, numerous proposals have been made, and more are likely forthcoming at the international, national, regional and state levels of government to monitor and limit existing emissions of GHGs as well as to restrict or eliminate such future emissions. As a result, our operations as well as the operations of our oil and natural gas exploration and production customers are subject to a series of executive, regulatory, political, litigation, and financial risks associated with the production and processing of fossil fuels and emission of GHGs. In the United States, no comprehensive climate change legislation has been implemented at the federal level, but President Biden has announced plans to take action with regards to climate change, has already signed several executive orders to this effect in January 2021 and, with control of Congress shifting in January 2021, is expected to pursue legislative as well as other executive and regulatory initiatives in the future to limit GHG emissions. Moreover, because the U.S. Supreme Court has held that GHG emissions constitute a pollutant under the CAA, the EPA has adopted rules that, among other things, establish construction and operating permit reviews for GHG emissions from certain large stationary sources, require the monitoring and annual reporting of GHG emissions from certain petroleum and natural gas system sources, implement New Source Performance Standards directing the reduction of methane from certain new, modified, or reconstructed facilities in the oil and natural gas sector, and together with the DOT, implement GHG emissions limits on vehicles manufactured for operation in the United States. In recent years, there has been considerable uncertainty surrounding regulation of the emissions of methane, which may be released during hydraulic fracturing. The EPA under the Obama Administration published final regulations under the CAA establishing performance standards in 2016, but since that time the EPA under the Trump Administration had undertaken several measures to delay implementation of the methane standards, including issuing final policy amendments to the final 2016 rule in September 2020 that, among other things, rescinded the methane standards previously applicable to sources in the 25


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    production and processing segments. Various industry and environmental groups are separately challenging both the 2016 standards and the September 2020 final policy amendments. Separate from those regulatory efforts, President Biden issued an executive order on January 20, 2021 that, among other things, called for issuance of proposed rules by no later than September 2021 that would restore Obama-era rules for methane standards applicable to new, modified, and reconstructed sources by suspending, revising or rescinding the EPA’s September 2020 final rule and that would establish new methane and volatile organic compound standards applicable to existing oil and gas operations, including the production, transmission, processing and storage segments. Separately, various states and groups of states have adopted or are considering adopting legislation, regulations or other regulatory initiatives that are focused on such areas as GHG cap and trade programs, carbon taxes, reporting and tracking programs, and restriction of emissions. At the international level, there is a non-binding agreement, the United Nations-sponsored “Paris Agreement,” for nations to limit their GHG emissions through individually-determined reduction goals every five years after 2020. While the United States withdrew from the Paris Agreement under the Trump Administration, effective November 4, 2020, President Biden issued an executive order on January 20, 2021 recommitting the United States to the Paris Agreement. With the United States recommitting to the Paris Agreement, executive orders may be issued or federal legislation or regulatory initiatives may be adopted to achieve the agreement’s goals, which could require us or our customers to incur increased, potentially significant, costs to comply with such requirements. Governmental, scientific, and public concern over the threat of climate change arising from GHG emissions has resulted in increasing political risks in the United States. Beyond the Biden Administration’s recommitting the United States to the Paris Agreement and proposing to re-instate the Obama methane standards, on January 20, 2021, the Acting Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior issued an order, effective immediately, that suspends new oil and gas leases and drilling permits on non-Indian federal lands and waters for a period of 60 days. Building on this suspension, President Biden issued an executive order on January 27, 2021 that suspends new leasing activities for oil and gas exploration and production on non-Indian federal lands and offshore waters pending completion of a comprehensive review and reconsideration of federal oil and gas permitting and leasing practices that take into consideration potential climate and other impacts associated with oil and gas activities on such lands and waters. The January 20, 2021 and January 27, 2021 orders do not apply to existing leases and the January 27, 2021 order further directs applicable agencies to take measures to ensure, to the extent consistent with applicable law, that federal funding is not directly subsidizing fossil fuels, with a further objective of eliminating fossil fuel subsidies from federal budget requests beginning in federal Fiscal Year 2022. In response, one industry group has already challenged President Biden’s January 27, 2021 order for “indefinitely suspending the federal oil and gas leasing program” in a federal court in Wyoming. Litigation risks are also increasing, as a number of states, municipalities and other plaintiffs have sought to bring suit against the largest oil and natural gas exploration and production companies in state or federal court, alleging, among other things, that such companies created public nuisances by producing fuels that contributed to global warming effects, such as rising sea levels, and therefore are responsible for roadway and infrastructure damages as a result, or alleging that the companies have been aware of the adverse effects of climate change for some time but defrauded their investors by failing to adequately disclose those impacts. There are also increasing financial risks for fossil fuel producers as well as other companies handling fossil fuels, including owners of terminals, pipelines and refineries, as stockholders and bondholders currently invested in fossil fuel energy companies concerned about the potential effects of climate change may elect in the future to shift some or all of their investments into non-fossil fuel energy related sectors. Institutional investors who provide financing to fossil fuel energy companies also have become more attentive to sustainability lending practices and some of them may elect not to provide funding for fossil fuel energy companies. Finally, increasing concentrations of GHG in the Earth’s atmosphere may produce climate changes that have significant physical effects, such as increased frequency and severity of storms, droughts, floods, rising sea levels and other climatic events. If any such climate changes were to occur, they could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations and the financial condition and operations of our customers. Endangered Species. The federal Endangered Species Act (the “ESA”) restricts activities that may affect endangered or threatened species or their habitats. Similar protections are offered to migratory birds under the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act (the “MBTA”). To the degree that species listed under the ESA or similar state laws, or are protected under the MBTA, live in the areas where we or our oil and gas producing customers operate, our and our 26


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    customers’ abilities to conduct or expand operations and construct facilities could be limited or be forced to incur material additional costs. Moreover, our customers’ drilling activities may be delayed, restricted, or cancelled in protected habitat areas or during certain seasons, such as breeding and nesting seasons. Some of our operations and the operations of our customers are located in areas that are designated as habitats for protected species. In addition, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (the “FWS”) may make determinations on the listing of unlisted species as endangered or threatened under the ESA. The designation of previously unidentified endangered or threatened species could indirectly cause us to incur additional costs, cause our or our oil and gas producing customers’ operations to become subject to operating restrictions or bans and limit future development activity in affected areas. The FWS and similar state agencies may designate critical or suitable habitat areas that they believe are necessary for the survival of threatened or endangered species. Such a designation could materially restrict use of or access to federal, state, and private lands. Chemical Safety. We are subject to a wide array of laws and regulations governing chemicals, including the regulation of chemical substances and inventories, such as TSCA in the U.S. These laws and regulations change frequently and have the potential to limit or ban altogether the types of chemicals we may use in our products, as well as result in increased costs related to testing, storing, and transporting our products prior to providing them to our customers. For example, in 2016, President Obama signed into law the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act (the “Lautenberg Act”), which substantially revised TSCA. Amongst other items, the Lautenberg Act eliminated the cost-benefit approach to analyzing chemical safety concerns with a health-based safety standard and requires all chemicals in commerce, including those “grandfathered” under TSCA, to undergo a safety review. The Lautenberg Act also requires safety findings before a new chemical can enter the market. Although it is not possible at this time to predict how EPA will implement and interpret the new provisions of the Lautenberg Act, or how legislation or new regulations that may be adopted pursuant to these regulatory and legislative efforts would impact our business, any new restrictions on the development of new products, increases in regulation, or disclosure of confidential, competitive information could have an adverse effect on our operations and our cost of doing business. Furthermore, governmental, regulatory and societal demands for increasing levels of product safety and environmental protection could result in increased pressure for more stringent regulatory control with respect to the chemical industry. These concerns could influence public perceptions regarding our products and operations, the viability of certain products, our reputation, the cost to comply with regulations, and the ability to attract and retain employees. Moreover, changes in environmental, health and safety regulations could inhibit or interrupt our operations, or require us to modify our facilities or operations. Accordingly, environmental or regulatory matters may cause us to incur significant unanticipated losses, costs or liabilities, which could reduce our profitability. Occupational Safety and Health and other legal requirements. We are subject to the requirements of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act and comparable state statutes whose purpose is to protect the health and safety of workers. In addition, the OSHA’s hazard communication standard, the EPA’s Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act and comparable state regulations and any implementing regulations require that we organize and/or disclose information about hazardous materials used or produced in our operations and that this information be provided to employees, state and local governmental authorities and citizens. We have an internal program of inspection designed to monitor and enforce compliance with worker safety requirements. In addition, as part of the services we provide, we operate as a motor carrier and therefore are subject to regulation by the U.S. Department of Transportation (“U.S. DOT”) and analogous state agencies. These regulatory authorities exercise broad powers, governing activities such as the authorization to engage in motor carrier operations, regulatory safety, and hazardous materials labeling, placarding and marking. There are additional regulations specifically relating to the trucking industry, including testing and specification of equipment and product handling requirements. The trucking industry is subject to possible regulatory and legislative changes that may affect the economics of the industry by requiring changes in operating practices or by changing the demand for common or contract carrier services or the cost of providing truckload services. From time to time, various legislative proposals are introduced, including proposals to increase federal, state or local taxes on motor fuels, among other things, which may increase our costs or adversely impact the recruitment of drivers. We cannot predict whether, or in what form, any increase in such taxes applicable to us will be enacted. 27


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    Seasonality Our results of operations have historically been adversely affected by seasonal declines in the activity levels of our customers, typically in the fourth quarter, related to holidays, inclement winter weather and in some years the exhaustion of our customers’ annual drilling and completions capital expenditure budgets. Intellectual Property Protection of our products and processes is important to our businesses. We own numerous patents and, where appropriate, we file patent applications for new products and technologies. For example, we use our AquaView® technology to quantify volumes and flow rates to verify current and potential water availability and volumes when analyzing a new water source. We also currently own multiple U.S. patents relating to completions technology including borate cross-linkers, slurry monitoring systems and others. We also have a robust program to seek patents on new developments. We have a meaningful backlog of pending patents, including a proprietary water analytics and automation tool, as well as creating fracturing fluids with produced water, evaporation methodologies, cross-linker/breaker mechanisms and liquid distribution metering systems. While a presumption of validity exists with respect to issued U.S. patents, we cannot assure that any of our patents will not be challenged, invalidated, circumvented or rendered unenforceable. Furthermore, we cannot assure the issuance of any pending patent application, or that if patents do issue, that these patents will provide meaningful protection against competitors or against competitive technologies. Additionally, our competitors or other third parties may obtain patents that restrict or preclude our ability to lawfully produce or sell our products in a competitive manner. We also rely upon continuing technological innovation and trade secrets to develop and maintain our competitive position. There can be no assurance that confidentiality and other agreements into which we enter and have entered will not be breached, that these agreements will provide meaningful protection for our trade secrets or proprietary know-how, or that adequate remedies will be available in the event of an unauthorized use or disclosure of such trade secrets and know-how. In addition, there can be no assurance that others will not obtain knowledge of these trade secrets through independent development or other access by legal means. We also own a number of trademarks, which we use in connection with our businesses. In addition to protections through federal registration, we also rely on state common law protections to protect our brand. There can be no assurance that the trademark registrations will provide meaningful protection against the use of similar trademarks by competitors, or that the value of our trademarks will not be diluted. Because of the breadth and nature of our intellectual property rights and our business, we do not believe that any single intellectual property right (other than certain trademarks for which we intend to maintain the applicable registrations) is material to our business. Moreover, we do not believe that the termination of intellectual property rights expected to occur over the next several years, either individually or in the aggregate, will materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations. Risk Management and Insurance Our operations are subject to hazards inherent in the oil and gas industry, including accidents, blowouts, explosions, craterings, fires, oil spills and hazardous materials spills. These conditions can cause: • personal injury or loss of life; • damage to, or destruction of, property, the environment and wildlife; and • the suspension of our or our customers’ operations. In addition, claims for loss of oil and gas production and damage to formations can occur in the well services industry. If a serious accident were to occur at a location where our equipment and services are being used, it could result in us being named as a defendant in lawsuits asserting large claims. 28


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    Because our business involves the transportation of heavy equipment and materials, we may also experience traffic accidents, which may result in spills, property damage and personal injury. Despite our efforts to maintain high safety standards, from time to time we have suffered accidents, and there is a risk that we will experience accidents in the future. In addition to the property and personal losses from these accidents, the frequency and severity of these incidents affect our operating costs and insurability, and our relationship with customers, employees and regulatory agencies. In particular, in recent years many of our large customers have placed an increased emphasis on the safety records of their service providers. Any significant increase in the frequency or severity of these incidents, or the general level of compensatory payments, could adversely affect the cost of, or our ability to obtain, workers’ compensation and other forms of insurance, and could have other material adverse effects on our financial condition and results of operations. We maintain insurance coverage of types and amounts that we believe to be customary in the industry including workers’ compensation, employer’s liability, sudden & accidental pollution, umbrella, comprehensive commercial general liability, business automobile and property and equipment physical damage insurance. Our insurance coverage may be inadequate to cover our liabilities. In addition, we may not be able to maintain adequate insurance in the future at rates we consider reasonable and commercially justifiable or on terms as favorable as our current arrangements. We enter into master service agreements (“MSAs”) with most of our customers. Our MSAs delineate our and our customer’s respective indemnification obligations with respect to the services we provide. Generally, under our MSAs, including those relating to our Water Services, Water Infrastructure, Oilfield Chemical product sales, accommodations and rentals and completion and construction services, we assume responsibility for pollution or contamination originating above the surface from our equipment or handling of the equipment of others. However, our customers generally assume responsibility for all other pollution or contamination that may occur during operations, including that which may generally result from seepage or any other uncontrolled flow of drilling fluids. The assumed responsibilities include the control, removal and cleanup of any pollution or contamination. In such cases, we may be exposed to additional liability if we are grossly negligent or commit willful acts causing the pollution or contamination. Generally, our customers also agree to indemnify us against claims arising from the personal injury or death of the customers’ employees or those of the customers’ other contractors, in the case of our hydraulic fracturing operations, to the extent that such employees are injured by such operations, unless the loss is a result of our gross negligence or willful misconduct. Similarly, we generally agree to indemnify our customers for liabilities arising from personal injury to or death of any of our employees or employees of any of our subcontractors, unless resulting from the gross negligence or willful misconduct of our customer. The same principals apply to mutual indemnification for loss or destruction of customer-owned property or equipment, except such indemnification is not limited in an instance of gross negligence or willful misconduct. Losses arising from catastrophic events, such as blowouts, are generally the responsibility of the customer. However, despite this general allocation of risk, we may be unsuccessful in enforcing contractual terms, incur an unforeseen liability that is not addressed by the scope of the contractual provisions or be required to enter into an MSA with terms that vary from our standard allocations of risk, as described above. Consequently, we may incur substantial losses that could materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. Available Information We file or furnish annual, quarterly and current reports and other documents with the SEC under the Exchange Act. The SEC also maintains an internet website at www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers, including us, that file electronically with the SEC. We also make available free of charge through our website, www.selectenergyservices.com, electronic copies of certain documents that we file with the SEC, including our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. Information on our website is not a part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. 29


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    ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS The following risks could affect our financial performance or could cause actual results to differ materially from estimates contained in our forward-looking statements. We may encounter risks in addition to those described below. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us, or that we currently deem to be immaterial, may also impair or adversely affect our business, results of operation, financial condition and prospects. 30


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    Risks Related to Our Business Operations Our business depends on capital spending by the oil and gas industry in the U.S. and reductions in capital spending could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity, results of operations and financial condition. Capital spending by our customers decreased during 2020, relative to prior year levels, due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on demand for oil and reduced prices resulting from the current oversupply of oil[, and we expect such decreased levels to continue in 2021. Demand for our services is directly affected by current and anticipated oil and natural gas prices and related capital spending by our customers to explore for, develop and produce oil and gas in the U.S. Prices for oil and gas historically have been extremely volatile and are expected to continue to be volatile, particularly in light of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. In March 2020, Saudi Arabia and Russia failed to reach a decision to cut production of oil and gas along with OPEC. Subsequently, Saudi Arabia significantly reduced the prices at which it sells oil and announced plans to increase production. These events, combined with the COVID-19 pandemic, contributed to a sharp drop in prices for oil in the first quarter of 2020 continuing into the second quarter of 2020. In April 2020, OPEC+ agreed to curtail oil production by approximately 10 million barrels per day in a coordinated effort to bring supply into better alignment with demand and thereby support the price of oil. During the year ended December 31, 2020, the average WTI spot price was $39.16, versus an average price of $56.99 for the year ended December 31, 2019. While oil prices have increased significantly since their lows in April 2020, the continued impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the associated impacts to global oil demand will result in continued uncertainty around the near-term price of oil. Volatility in or sub-economic oil prices or natural gas prices (or the perception that oil prices or natural gas prices will decrease) affects the spending patterns of our customers and may result in the drilling or completion of fewer new wells or lower spending on existing wells. This, in turn, could lead to lower demand for our services and may cause lower rates and lower utilization of our assets. For example, multiple leading international and national oil companies, as well as public and private independent oil and gas producers, reduced capital expenditures in 2020, and many of our customers have reduced their capital expenditures budget for 2021. Even in an environment of stronger oil and gas prices, fewer oil and gas well completions in our market areas as a result of decreased capital spending may have a negative long-term impact on our business. Any of these conditions or events could adversely affect our operating results, as they did in 2020 and may continue to do so into 2021. If the demand for our services does not recover to pre- pandemic levels, our liquidity, results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected. Industry conditions are influenced by numerous factors over which we have no control, including: • the severity and duration of world health events, including the COVID-19 pandemic, related economic repercussions and the resulting severe disruption in the oil and gas industry and negative impact on demand for oil and gas, which is negatively impacting our business; • domestic and foreign economic conditions and supply of and demand for oil and gas; • the level of prices, and expectations regarding future prices, of oil and gas; • the level of global oil and gas exploration and production and storage capacity; • operational challenges relating to the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to mitigate the spread of the virus, including logistical challenges resulting from limited worksite access, remote work arrangements, performance of contracts and supply chain disruption; • recommendations of, or restrictions imposed by, government and health authorities, including travel bans, quarantines, and shelter-in-place orders to address the COVID-19 pandemic; • actions by the members of OPEC+ with respect to oil production levels and announcements of potential changes in such levels, including the ability of the OPEC+ countries to agree on and comply with supply limitations; 31


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    • governmental regulations, including the policies of governments regarding the exploration for and production and development of their oil and gas reserves; • taxation and royalty charges; • political and economic conditions in oil and gas producing countries; • global weather conditions, pandemics and natural disasters; • worldwide political, military and economic conditions; • political or civil unrest in the United States or elsewhere; • the cost of producing and delivering oil and gas; • the discovery rates of new oil and gas reserves; • activities by non-governmental organizations to limit certain sources of funding for the energy sector or restrict the exploration, development and production of oil and gas; • the ability of oil and gas producers to access capital; • technical advances affecting production efficiencies and overall energy consumption; and • the potential acceleration of the development of alternative fuels. The widespread outbreak of an illness or any other communicable disease, or any other public health crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. The global or national outbreak of an illness or any other communicable disease, or any other public health crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, may cause disruptions to our business and operational plans, which may include (i) shortages of qualified employees in a given area, (ii) unavailability of contractors and subcontractors, (iii) interruption of supplies from third parties upon which we rely, (iv) recommendations of, or restrictions imposed by, government and health authorities, including quarantines, to address the COVID-19 pandemic and (v) restrictions that we and our contractors and subcontractors impose, including facility shutdowns or access restrictions, to ensure the safety of employees and (vi) reductions, delays or cancellations of planned operations by our customers. Additionally, these disruptions could negatively impact our financial results. For example, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we temporarily closed our corporate offices and restricted all non-critical personnel to work remotely for a period of time, reduced headcount and employee salaries both temporarily and permanently, closed certain yard locations, reduced third-party expenses, streamlined operations, reduced capital expenditures and recorded impairment expenses. Further, the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and concerns regarding its global spread have negatively impacted the global economy, reduced global oil demand, disrupted global supply chains and created significant volatility and disruption of financial and commodities markets, which could lead to our customers curtailing existing production due to lack of downstream demand or storage capacity as well as reducing or eliminating the number of wells completed in the near to medium term. Additionally, a significant majority of states as well as local jurisdictions have imposed, and others in the future may impose, “stay-at-home” orders, quarantines, executive orders and similar government orders and restrictions for their residents to control the spread of COVID-19. Such orders or restrictions, and the perception that such orders or restrictions could occur, have resulted in business closures, work stoppages, slowdowns and delays, work-from-home policies, travel restrictions and cancellation of events, among other effects. 32


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    The extent of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our operational and financial performance, including our ability to execute our business strategies and initiatives, will depend on future developments, including the duration and spread of COVID-19 and related restrictions on travel and general mobility, all of which are uncertain and cannot be predicted. An extended period of global supply chain and economic disruption, as well as significantly decreased demand for oil and gas, could materially affect our business, results of operations, access to sources of liquidity and financial condition, and we have experienced the negative impacts of such disruption since March 2020. If volatility in oil prices or natural gas prices continues, the demand for our services could be adversely affected. The demand for our services is primarily determined by current and anticipated oil and natural gas prices and the related levels of capital spending and drilling activity in the areas in which we have operations. Volatility or weakness in oil prices or natural gas prices (or the perception that oil prices or natural gas prices will decrease) affects the spending patterns of our customers and may result in the drilling or completion of fewer new wells or lower production spending on existing wells. This, in turn, could lead to lower demand for our services and may cause lower rates and lower utilization of our assets. If oil prices or natural gas prices decline, or if completions activity is reduced, the demand for our services and our results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. Prices for oil and gas historically have been extremely volatile and are expected to continue to be volatile. During 2020, the West Texas Intermediate (“WTI”) price for oil has ranged from less than zero to $63.27 per Bbl. If the prices of oil and natural gas decline, our operations, financial condition, cash flows and level of expenditures may be materially and adversely affected. Recent volatility in oil and gas prices and pressure from investors has led, and may continue to lead, our customers to implement a more disciplined capital spending strategy. This disciplined approach has led to, and could continue to result in, reduced demand for our services and cause our customers to demand lower rates for our services, which could materially and adversely affect our results of operation. We have developed certain key infrastructure assets in the Bakken area of North Dakota and in the Northern Delaware Basin region of the Permian Basin in New Mexico, making us vulnerable to risks associated with conducting business in these regions. We have secured three governmental permits that enable us to withdraw water from the Missouri River and Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota and have developed and expect to develop in the future significant water infrastructure related to these permits. Because of the key nature of these permits and water infrastructure within the Bakken, the success and profitability of our business may be disproportionately exposed to factors impacting this region. These factors include, among others: (i) the prices of, and associated costs to produce, crude oil and gas from wells in the Bakken and other regional supply and demand factors (including the generally higher cost nature of production in the Bakken compared to other major shale plays and the pricing differentials that exist in the Bakken because of transportation constraints); (ii) the amount of exploration, development and production activities of our Bakken customers and their spending on our services; (iii) our ability to keep and maintain our governmental water permits; (iv) the cost of operations and the prices we can charge our customers in this region; and (v) the availability of equipment, supplies, and labor. Although we currently have secured key permits for water in this region, if we were to lose our water rights for any reason, including termination by the government upon the occurrence of a material breach, including nonpayment and default in performance, unexpected adverse environmental impacts, or our competitors were able to secure equivalent rights, our business could be materially harmed. In addition, our operations in the Bakken field may be adversely affected by severe weather events such as floods, blizzards, ice storms and tornadoes. For the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018, our Bakken operations represented 6.4%, 7.1% and 9.9%, respectively, of our revenues. The concentration of our water permits and significant infrastructure assets in North Dakota also increases our exposure to changes in local laws and regulations, including those designed to protect wildlife and unexpected events that may occur in this region such as seismic events, industrial accidents or labor difficulties. Any of the risks described above could have an adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. 33


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    Additionally, with the acquisition of Gregory Rockhouse Ranch, Inc. in March 2017 and the completion of our New Mexico pipeline in November 2019, we have bolstered our water and water-related services to our customers in New Mexico. We expect to further develop those water and water-related services in the state in the future but the future availability of, and/or access to, water in New Mexico will be affected by the results of a case, Texas v. New Mexico and Colorado, for which discovery is continuing in January 2021 and is expected to be tried by a special master in 2021. In this lawsuit, Texas is alleging that New Mexico is unlawfully allowing diversion of Rio Grande surface water, including groundwater hydrologically connected to the Rio Grande, and thereby depriving Texas of the full amount of Rio Grande water it is due under the Rio Grande Compact, which agreement was created in 1938 to ensure that the two states and the state of Colorado would get their fair share of water from the river. To the extent that this lawsuit is adversely decided against New Mexico, the state could, among other things, be required to provide more water downstream to Texas, which could reduce the availability of and/or access to water to existing or new water rights holders in New Mexico. The risk of such adverse development could reduce our ability to obtain or maintain access to water for our customers’ operations in the vicinity of our assets in New Mexico and have a corresponding adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Restrictions on the ability to procure water or changes in water sourcing requirements could decrease the demand for our water-related services. Our business includes water transfer for use in our customers’ oil and gas E&P activities. Our access to the water we supply may be limited due to prolonged drought or our inability to acquire or maintain water sourcing permits or other rights. In addition, some state and local governmental authorities have begun to monitor or restrict the use of water subject to their jurisdiction for hydraulic fracturing to ensure adequate local water supply. For instance, some states require E&P companies to report certain information regarding the water they use for hydraulic fracturing and to monitor the quality of groundwater surrounding some wells stimulated by hydraulic fracturing. Any such decrease in the availability of water, or demand for water services, could adversely affect our business and results of operations. Fuel conservation measures could reduce demand for oil and natural gas which would, in turn, reduce the demand for our services. Fuel conservation measures, alternative fuel requirements and increasing consumer demand for alternatives to oil and natural gas could reduce demand for oil and natural gas. The impact of declining demand for oil and natural gas may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, prospects, results of operations and cash flows. Additionally, the increased competitiveness of alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, geothermal, tidal, fuel cells and biofuels) could reduce demand for hydrocarbons and therefore for our services, which would lead to a reduction in our revenues. We may be unable to implement price increases or maintain existing prices on our core services. We periodically seek to increase the prices on our services to offset rising costs and to improve returns on investment for our stockholders. However, we operate in a very competitive industry and as a result, we are not always successful in raising, or maintaining, our existing prices. Additionally, during periods of increased market demand, a significant amount of new service capacity, including new water transfer equipment, fluid hauling trucks and pipelines, may enter the market, which also puts pressure on the pricing of our services and limits our ability to increase prices. Even when we are able to increase our prices, we may not be able to do so at a rate that is sufficient to offset rising costs. In periods of high demand for oilfield services, a tighter labor market may result in higher labor costs. During such periods, our labor costs could increase at a greater rate than our ability to raise prices for our services. Also, we may not be able to successfully increase prices without adversely affecting our activity levels. The inability to maintain our pricing and to increase our pricing as costs increase could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position and results of operations. 34


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    We have operated at a loss in the past, including in 2020, and there is no assurance of our profitability in the future. Historically, we have experienced periods of low demand for our services and have incurred operating losses, including in 2020. In the future, we may not be able to reduce our costs, increase our revenues or reduce our debt service obligations sufficient to achieve or maintain profitability and generate positive operating income. Under such circumstances, we may incur further operating losses and experience negative operating cash flow. We may be subject to claims for personal injury and property damage, which could materially adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. We operate with most of our customers under MSAs. We endeavor to allocate potential liabilities and risks between the parties in the MSAs. Generally, under our MSAs, including those relating to our services, we assume responsibility for, including control and removal of, pollution or contamination which originates above the surface and originates from our equipment or services. Our customers generally assume responsibility for, including control and removal of, all other pollution or contamination which may occur during operations, including that which may result from seepage or any other uncontrolled flow of drilling fluids. We may have liability in such cases if we are negligent or commit willful acts. Generally, our customers also agree to indemnify us against claims arising from their employees’ personal injury or death to the extent that, in the case of our operations, their employees are injured or their properties are damaged by such operations unless resulting from our gross negligence or willful misconduct. Similarly, we generally agree to indemnify our customers for liabilities arising from personal injury to or death of any of our employees, unless resulting from gross negligence or willful misconduct of the customer. In addition, our customers generally agree to indemnify us for loss or destruction of customer-owned property or equipment and in turn, we agree to indemnify our customers for loss or destruction of property or equipment we own. Losses due to catastrophic events, such as blowouts, are generally the responsibility of the customer. However, despite this general allocation of risk, we might not succeed in enforcing such contractual allocation, might incur an unforeseen liability falling outside the scope of such allocation or may be required to enter into an MSA with terms that vary from the above allocations of risk. As a result, we may incur substantial losses which could materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. We operate in a highly competitive industry, which may intensify as our competitors expand their operations, thereby causing us to lose market share, and which could negatively affect our ability to expand our operations. The oilfield water management business is highly competitive and includes numerous small companies capable of competing effectively in our markets on a local basis. Some of our larger diversified competitors have a similarly broad geographic scope, as well as greater financial and other resources than us, while others focus on specific basins only and may have locally competitive cost efficiencies as a result. Additionally, there may be new companies that enter our markets, or our existing and potential customers may choose to develop their own water management solutions. Our ability to maintain current revenue and cash flows, and our ability to expand our operations, could be adversely affected by the activities of our competitors and our customers. We may be unable to effectively compete if our competitors substantially increase the resources they devote to the development and marketing of the services that we offer, or substantially decrease the prices at which they offer their services. If our existing and potential customers develop their own water solutions, we may not be able to effectively replace that revenue. All of these competitive pressures could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. The oil and gas services industry is intensely competitive, and in certain businesses we compete with other companies that have greater resources than us. Many of our larger competitors provide a broader base of services on a regional, national or worldwide basis. These companies may have a greater ability to continue oilfield service activities during periods of low commodity prices, to contract for equipment, to secure trained personnel, to secure contracts and permits and to absorb the burden of present and future federal, state, provincial, local and other laws and regulations (as applicable). Any inability to compete effectively with larger companies could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations. 35


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    Our operations involve risks that may increase our operating costs, which could reduce our profitability. Although we take precautions to enhance the safety of our operations and minimize the risk of disruptions, our operations are subject to hazards inherent in the manufacturing and marketing of chemical and other products. These hazards include chemical spills, pipeline leaks and ruptures, storage tank leaks, discharges or releases of toxic or hazardous substances or gases and other hazards incident to the manufacturing, processing, handling, transportation and storage of hazardous chemicals. We are also potentially subject to other hazards, including natural disasters and severe weather; explosions and fires; transportation problems, including interruptions, spills and leaks; mechanical failures; unscheduled downtimes; labor difficulties; remediation complications; and other risks. Many potential hazards can cause bodily injury and loss of life, severe damage to or destruction of property and equipment and environmental damage, and may result in suspension of operations and the imposition of civil or criminal penalties and liabilities. Furthermore, we are subject to present and future claims with respect to workplace exposure, exposure of contractors on our premises as well as other persons located nearby, workers’ compensation and other matters. We maintain property, business interruption, products liability and casualty insurance policies which we believe are in accordance with customary industry practices, as well as insurance policies covering other types of risks, including pollution legal liability insurance, but we are not fully insured against all potential hazards and risks incident to our business. Each of these insurance policies is subject to customary exclusions, deductibles and coverage limits, in accordance with industry standards and practices. As a result of market conditions, premiums and deductibles for certain insurance policies can increase substantially and, in some instances, certain insurance may become unavailable or available only for reduced amounts of coverage. If we were to incur a significant liability for which we were not fully insured, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and liquidity. In addition, we are subject to various claims and litigation in the ordinary course of business. We are a party to various pending lawsuits and proceedings. For more information, see “Item 3. Legal Proceedings.” Delays or restrictions in obtaining permits by us for our operations or by our E&P customers for their operations could impair our business. Our operations and the operations of our E&P customers in most states require permits from one or more governmental agencies in order to perform drilling and completion activities, secure water rights, construct impoundment tanks and operate pipelines or trucking services. Such permits are typically issued by state agencies, but federal and local governmental permits may also be required. In addition, some of our customers’ drilling and completion activities in the U.S. may take place on federal land or Native American lands, requiring leases and other approvals from the federal government or Native American tribes to conduct such drilling and completion activities. Under certain circumstances, federal agencies may cancel proposed leases for federal lands and refuse to grant or delay required approvals. Moreover, President Biden has indicated his intent to restrict hydraulic fracturing on federal lands through delays or bans on issuance of drilling permits on such lands and his administration may pursue regulatory initiatives, executive actions and legislation in support of his regulatory agenda. See Part I, Item 1. “Business – Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Matters” for more discussion on possible actions under the Biden Administration that may adversely affect oil and natural gas leasing and permitting activities. We are subject to cybersecurity risks. A cyber incident could occur and result in information theft, data corruption, operational disruption and/or financial loss. The oil and gas services industry has become increasingly dependent on digital technologies to conduct certain processing activities. For example, we depend on digital technologies to perform many of our services and to process and record financial and operating data. At the same time, cyber incidents, including deliberate attacks or unintentional events, have increased. The U.S. government has issued public warnings that indicate that energy assets might be specific targets of cybersecurity threats. Our technologies, systems and networks, and those of our vendors, suppliers and other business partners, may become the target of cyber attacks or information security breaches that could result in the unauthorized release, gathering, monitoring, misuse, loss or destruction of proprietary and other information, or other disruption of business operations. In addition, certain cyber incidents, such as surveillance, may remain undetected for an extended period. Our systems for protecting against cybersecurity risks may not be sufficient. As cyber incidents 36


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    continue to evolve, we may be required to expend additional resources to continue to modify or enhance our protective measures or to investigate and remediate any vulnerability to cyber incidents. Our insurance coverage for cyber attacks may not be sufficient to cover all the losses we may experience as a result of such cyber attacks. If we are unable to fully protect our intellectual property rights, we may suffer a loss in our competitive advantage or market share. We do not have patents or patent applications relating to many of our proprietary chemicals. If we are not able to maintain the confidentiality of our trade secrets, or if our competitors are able to replicate our technology or services, our competitive advantage would be diminished. We also cannot assure you that any patents we may obtain in the future would provide us with any significant commercial benefit or would allow us to prevent our competitors from employing comparable technologies or processes. Technology advancements in well service technologies, including those involving the replacement of water in fracturing fluid, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The oilfield services industry is characterized by rapid and significant technological advancements and introductions of new products and services using new technologies. As competitors and others use or develop new technologies or technologies comparable to ours in the future, we may lose market share or be placed at a competitive disadvantage. For example, some oil and gas producers are focusing on developing and utilizing non -water fracturing techniques, including those utilizing propane, carbon dioxide or nitrogen instead of water. Further, we may face competitive pressure to implement or acquire certain new technologies at a substantial cost. Some of our competitors may have greater financial, technical and personnel resources than we do, which may allow them to gain technological advantages or implement new technologies before we can. Additionally, we may be unable to implement new technologies or products at all, on a timely basis or at an acceptable cost. New technology could also make it easier for our customers to vertically integrate their operations or reduce the amount of waste produced in oil and gas drilling and production activities, thereby reducing or eliminating the need for third-party disposal. Limits on our ability to effectively use or implement new technologies may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. We may be adversely affected by uncertainty in the global financial markets and a worldwide economic downturn. Our future results may be impacted by uncertainty caused by a worldwide economic downturn, continued volatility or deterioration in the debt and equity capital markets, inflation, deflation or other adverse economic conditions that may negatively affect us or parties with whom we do business resulting in a reduction in our customers’ spending and their non-payment or inability to perform obligations owed to us, such as the failure of customers to honor their commitments or the failure of major suppliers to complete orders. The COVID-19 pandemic has created global uncertainty that has negatively affected our business and industry and will continue to do so. Additionally, credit market conditions may change, slowing our collection efforts as customers may experience increased difficulty in obtaining requisite financing, potentially leading to lost revenue and higher than normal accounts receivable. In the event of the financial distress or bankruptcy of a customer, we could lose all or a portion of such outstanding accounts receivable associated with that customer. Further, all or a portion of our service contracts could be cancelled at significant expense or loss of expected revenues to us if a customer was to enter into bankruptcy. The current global economic environment may adversely impact our ability to issue debt. Any economic uncertainty may cause institutional investors to respond to their borrowers by increasing interest rates, enacting tighter lending standards or refusing to refinance existing debt upon its maturity or on terms similar to the expiring debt. Due to the above-listed factors, we cannot be certain that additional funding will be available if needed and, to the extent required, on acceptable terms. 37


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    Our operations are subject to inherent risks, some of which are beyond our control. These risks may be self-insured, or may not be fully covered under our insurance policies. Our operations are subject to hazards inherent in the oil and gas industry, such as, but not limited to, accidents, blowouts, explosions, craterings, fires, oil spills and releases of drilling, completion or fracturing fluids or wastewater into the environment. These conditions can cause: • disruption in operations; • substantial repair or remediate costs; • personal injury or loss of human life; • significant damage to or destruction of property, plant and equipment; • environmental pollution, including groundwater contamination; • impairment or suspension of operations; and • substantial revenue loss. The occurrence of a significant event or adverse claim in excess of the insurance coverage that we maintain or that is not covered by insurance could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity, results of operations and financial condition. Any interruption in our services due to pipeline breakdowns or necessary maintenance or repairs could reduce sales revenues and earnings. In addition, claims for loss of oil and gas production and damage to formations can occur in the well services industry. Litigation arising from a catastrophic occurrence at a location where our equipment and services are being used may result in our being named as a defendant in lawsuits asserting large claims. We do not have insurance against all foreseeable risks, either because insurance is not available or because of the high premium costs. The occurrence of an event not fully insured against or the failure of an insurer to meet its insurance obligations could result in substantial losses. In addition, we may not be able to maintain adequate insurance in the future at rates we consider reasonable. Insurance may not be available to cover any or all of the risks to which we are subject, or, even if available, it may be inadequate, or insurance premiums or other costs could rise significantly in the future so as to make such insurance prohibitively expensive. Seasonal weather conditions and natural disasters could severely disrupt normal operations and harm our business. Our water solutions operations are located primarily in the southern, mid-western and eastern U.S. Certain of these areas are adversely affected by seasonal weather conditions, primarily in the winter and spring. During periods of heavy snow, ice or rain, we may be unable to move our equipment between locations, thereby reducing our ability to provide services and generate revenues. Additionally, extended drought conditions in our operating regions could impact our ability to source sufficient water for our customers or increase the cost for such water. As a result, a natural disaster or inclement weather conditions could severely disrupt the normal operation of our business and adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations. A terrorist attack, armed conflict or unrest could harm our business. The occurrence or threat of terrorist attacks in the U.S. or other countries, anti-terrorist efforts and other armed conflicts involving the U.S. or other countries, including continued hostilities in the Middle East, and political or civil unrest in the U.S. may adversely affect the U.S. and global economies and could prevent us from meeting our financial and other obligations. Additionally, destructive forms of protest and opposition by extremists and other disruptions, including acts of sabotage or eco-terrorism, against oil and natural gas development and production activities could potentially result in personal injury to persons, damages to property, natural resources or the environment, or lead to 38


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    extended interruptions of our or our customers’ operations. If any of these events occur, the resulting political instability and societal disruption could reduce overall demand for oil and gas, potentially putting downward pressure on demand for our services and causing a reduction in our revenues. Oil and gas related facilities could be direct targets of such terrorist attacks or unrest, and our operations could be adversely impacted if infrastructure integral to our customers’ operations is destroyed or damaged. Costs for insurance and other security may increase as a result of these threats, and some insurance coverage may become more difficult to obtain, if available at all. The adoption of more stringent trucking legislation or regulations may increase our costs and could have an adverse effect on our liquidity, results of operations, and financial condition. In connection with the services we provide, we operate as a motor carrier and therefore are subject to regulation by the U.S. DOT and analogous state agencies, which govern such activities as the authorization to engage in motor carrier operations and regulatory safety. The trucking industry is subject to possible legislative and regulatory changes that may affect the economics of the industry by requiring changes in operating practices or by changing the demand for common or contract carrier services or the cost of providing truckload services. Moreover, from time to time, various legislative proposals are introduced, including proposals to increase federal, state or local taxes, including taxes on motor fuels, which may increase our costs or adversely affect the recruitment of drivers. Management cannot predict whether, or in what form, any increase in such taxes applicable to us will be enacted. We may be required to increase operating expenses or capital expenditures in order to comply with any new laws, regulations or other restrictions. See Part I, Item 1. “Business – Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Matters” for more discussion on the DOT and associated trucking matters. Disruptions in the transportation services of trucking companies transporting wastewater and other oilfield products could have an adverse effect on our results. We use trucks to transport some produced water to our wastewater disposal facilities. In recent years, certain states, such as North Dakota and Texas, and certain state counties have increased enforcement of weight limits on trucks used to transport raw materials on their public roads. It is possible that the states, counties and municipalities in which we operate our business may modify their laws or regulations to further reduce truck weight limits or impose curfews or other restrictions on the use of roadways. Such legislation and regulations and associated enforcement efforts could result in delays, and increased costs, with respect to the transport of produced water to our wastewater disposal facilities, which may either increase our operating costs or reduce the amount of produced water transported to our facilities. Such developments could decrease our operating margins or amounts of produced water and thereby have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. A significant increase in fuel prices may adversely affect our transportation costs, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. Fuel is one of our significant operating expenses, and a significant increase in fuel prices could result in increased transportation costs. The price and supply of fuel is unpredictable and fluctuates based on events such as geopolitical developments, supply and demand for oil and gas, actions by oil and gas producers, war and unrest in oil producing countries and regions, regional production patterns and weather concerns. A significant increase in fuel prices could increase the price of, and therefore reduce demand for, our services, which could affect our results of operations and financial condition. Risks Related to Customers and Suppliers The deterioration of the financial condition of our customers could adversely affect our business. During times when the gas or crude oil markets weaken, including during 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and other factors, our customers are more likely to experience financial difficulties, including being unable to access debt or equity financing, which could result in a reduction in our customers’ spending for our services. In addition, in the course of our business we hold accounts receivable from our customers. In the event of the financial 39


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    distress or bankruptcy of a customer, we could lose all or a portion of such outstanding accounts receivable associated with that customer. Further, all or a portion of our service contracts could be cancelled at significant expense or loss of expected revenues to us if a customer was to enter into bankruptcy. Disruptions in production at our chemical manufacturing facilities may have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations and/or financial condition. Chemical manufacturing facilities in our industry are subject to outages and other disruptions. Serious disruptions at any of our facilities could impair our ability to use our facilities and have a material adverse impact on our revenue and increase our costs and expenses. Unplanned production disruptions may occur for external reasons including natural disasters, weather, disease, strikes, transportation interruption, government regulation, political or civil unrest or terrorism, or internal reasons, such as fire, unplanned maintenance or other manufacturing problems. Moreover, alternative facilities with sufficient capacity may not be available, may cost substantially more or may take a significant time to increase production or qualify with our customers, any of which could negatively impact our business, results of operations and/or financial condition. Long-term production disruptions may cause our customers to seek alternative supply, which could further adversely affect our profitability. Unplanned production disruptions may occur for external reasons including natural disasters, world health events, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, weather, disease, strikes, transportation interruption, government regulation, political or civil unrest or terrorism, or internal reasons, such as fire, unplanned maintenance or other manufacturing problems. Any such production disruption could have a material impact on our operations, operating results and financial condition. Additionally, we rely on a number of vendors, suppliers, and in some cases sole-source suppliers, service providers, toll manufacturers and collaborations with other industry participants to provide us with chemicals, feedstocks and other raw materials, along with energy sources and, in certain cases, facilities that we need to operate our business. If the business of these third parties is disrupted, some of these companies could be forced to reduce their output, shut down their operations or file for bankruptcy protection. If this were to occur, it could adversely affect their ability to provide us with the raw materials, energy sources or facilities that we need, which could materially disrupt our operations, including the production of certain of our chemical products. Moreover, it could be difficult to find replacements for certain of our business partners without incurring significant delays or cost increases. All of these risks could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and liquidity. While we maintain business recovery plans that are intended to allow us to recover from natural disasters or other events that could disrupt our business, we cannot provide assurances that our plans would fully protect us from the effects of all such disasters or from events that might increase in frequency or intensity due to climate change. In addition, insurance may not adequately compensate us for any losses incurred as a result of natural or other disasters. In areas prone to frequent natural or other disasters, insurance may become increasingly expensive or not available at all. Constraints in the supply of equipment used in providing services to our customers and replacement parts for such could affect our ability to execute our growth strategies. Equipment used in providing services to our customers is normally readily available. Market conditions could trigger constraints in the supply chain of certain equipment or replacement parts for such equipment, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. The majority of our risk associated with supply chain constraints occurs in those situations where we have a relationship with a single supplier for a particular resource. Unsatisfactory safety performance may negatively affect our E&P customer relationships and, to the extent we fail to retain existing customers or attract new customers, adversely impact our revenues. Our ability to retain existing E&P customers and attract new business is dependent on many factors, including our ability to demonstrate that we can reliably and safely operate our business and stay current on constantly changing rules, regulations, training and laws. Existing and potential customers consider the safety record of their service providers to be of high importance in their decision to engage third-party services. If one or more accidents were to 40


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    occur at one of our operating sites, the affected customer may seek to terminate or cancel its use of our facilities or services and may be less likely to continue to use our services, which could cause us to lose substantial revenues. Further, our ability to attract new customers may be impaired if they elect not to purchase our third-party services because they view our safety record as unacceptable. In addition, it is possible that we will experience numerous or particularly severe accidents in the future, causing our safety record to deteriorate. This may be more likely as we continue to grow, if we experience high employee turnover or labor shortage, or add inexperienced personnel. See Part I, Item 1. “Business – Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Matters” for more discussion on worker safety matters. Significant price volatility or interruptions in supply of our raw materials for our chemicals business may result in increased costs that we may be unable to pass on to our customers, which could reduce profitability. We purchase a substantial portion of our raw materials for our chemicals business from third-party suppliers and the cost of these raw materials represents a substantial portion of our operating expenses. The prices of the raw materials that we purchase from third parties are cyclical and volatile. Our supply agreements provide us only limited protection against price volatility because they are entered into either on a short-term basis or are longer-term volume contracts, which provide for market-based pricing renegotiated several times per year. While we attempt to match cost increases with corresponding product price increases, we are not always able to raise product prices immediately or at all. Timing differences between raw material prices, which may change daily, and contractual product prices, which in many cases are negotiated only monthly or less often, have had and may continue to have a negative effect on our cash flow. Any cost increase that we are not able to pass on to our customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and liquidity. There are several raw materials for which there are only a limited number of suppliers or a single supplier. To mitigate potential supply constraints, we enter into supply agreements with particular suppliers, evaluate alternative sources of supply and evaluate alternative technologies to avoid reliance on limited or sole-source suppliers. Where supply relationships are concentrated, particular attention is paid by the parties to ensure strategic intentions are aligned to facilitate long-term planning. If certain of our suppliers are unable to meet their obligations under present supply agreements, we may be forced to pay higher prices to obtain the necessary raw materials from other sources and we may not be able to increase prices for our finished products to recoup the higher raw materials costs. Any interruption in the supply of raw materials could increase our costs or decrease our revenue, which could reduce our cash flow. The inability of a supplier to meet our raw material needs could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. The number of sources for and availability of certain raw materials is also specific to the particular geographical region in which a facility is located. Political and economic instability in the countries from which we purchase our raw material supplies could adversely affect their availability. In addition, if raw materials become unavailable within a geographic area from which they are now sourced, we may not be able to obtain suitable or cost-effective substitutes. We may also experience higher operating costs such as energy or transportation costs, which could affect our profitability. We may not always be able to increase our selling prices to offset the impact of any higher production costs or reduced production levels, which could reduce our earnings and decrease our liquidity. Risks Related to Compliance with Regulations Laws, regulations, executive actions and other regulatory initiatives in the U.S. relating to hydraulic fracturing could increase our costs of doing business and result in additional operating restrictions, delays or cancellations in the drilling and completion of oil and gas wells, or possible restrictions on the performance of hydraulic fracturing that may reduce demand for our services and could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity, results of operations and financial condition. Although we do not directly engage in hydraulic fracturing, our operations support many of our E&P customers in such activities. The practice continues to be controversial in certain parts of the country, resulting in increased scrutiny and regulation of the hydraulic fracturing process, including by federal and state agencies and local municipalities. Additionally, with concerns about seismic activity being triggered by the injection of produced wastewaters into 41


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    underground disposal wells, certain regulators are also considering additional requirements related to seismic safety for hydraulic fracturing activities. See Part I, Item 1. “Business – Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Matters” for more discussion on these hydraulic fracturing and seismicity matters. The adoption of any federal, state or local laws or the implementation of regulations or issuance of executive orders regarding hydraulic fracturing, seismic activities or leasing activities on federal properties could potentially cause a decrease in the completion of new oil and gas wells and an associated decrease in demand for our services and increased compliance costs and time, which could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity, results of operations, and financial condition. Our and our E&P customers’ operations are subject to a number of risks arising out of the threat of climate change, including regulatory, political, litigation, and financial risks, which could result in increased operating and capital costs for our customers and reduced demand for the products and services we provide. The threat of climate change continues to attract considerable attention in the U.S. and foreign countries. As a result, numerous proposals have been made and are likely to continue to be made at the international, national, regional and state levels of government to monitor and limit emissions of GHGs as well as to eliminate such future emissions. As a result, our operations as well as the operations of our E&P customers are subject to a series of regulatory, political, litigation and financial risks associated with the production and processing of fossil fuels and emission of GHGs. See Part I, Item 1. “Business – Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Matters” for more discussion on the threat of climate and restriction of GHG emissions. The adoption and implementation of any international, federal, regional or state legislation, executive actions, regulations or other regulatory initiatives that impose more stringent standards for GHG emissions from the oil and natural gas sector or otherwise restrict the areas in which this sector may produce oil and natural gas or generate GHG emissions could result in increased compliance costs or costs of consuming fossil fuels. Such legislation, executive actions or regulations could result in increased costs of compliance or costs of consuming, and thereby reduce demand for oil and natural gas, which could reduce demand for our products and services. Additionally, political, financial and litigation risks may result in our customers restricting, delaying or canceling production activities, incurring liability for infrastructure damages as a result of climatic changes, or impairing the ability to continue to operate in an economic manner, which also could reduce demand for our products and services. The occurrence of one or more of these developments could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Moreover, the increased competitiveness of alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar geothermal, tidal and biofuels) could reduce demand for hydrocarbons, and therefore for our products and services, which would lead to a reduction in our revenues. Our chemical products are subject to stringent chemical control laws that could result in increased costs on our business. We are subject to a wide array of laws and regulations governing chemicals, including the regulation of chemical substances and inventories, such as the TSCA. These laws and regulations change frequently and have the potential to limit or ban altogether the types of chemicals we may use in our products, as well as result in increased costs related to testing, storing, and transporting our products prior to providing them to our customers. Any new restrictions on the development of new products or use of existing products, increases in regulation of those products, or disclosure of confidential, competitive information relating to the products could have an adverse effect on our operations and our cost of doing business. Furthermore, governmental, regulatory and societal demands for increasing levels of product safety and environmental protection could result in increased pressure for more stringent regulatory control with respect to the chemical industry. See Part I, Item 1. “Business – Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Matters” for more discussion on chemical product use and safety. In the future, we may face increased obligations relating to the closing of our wastewater disposal facilities and may be required to provide an increased level of financial assurance to guarantee that the appropriate closure activities will occur for a wastewater disposal facility. Our ability to obtain permits to own or operate wastewater disposal facilities generally requires us to establish performance bonds, letters of credit or other forms of financial assurance to address remediation and closure obligations. 42


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    As we acquire additional wastewater disposal facilities or expand our existing wastewater disposal facilities, these obligations will increase. Additionally, in the future, regulatory agencies may require us to increase the amount of our closure bonds at existing wastewater disposal facilities. Moreover, actual costs could exceed our current expectations, as a result of, among other things, federal, state or local government regulatory action, increased costs charged by service providers that assist in closing wastewater disposal facilities and additional environmental remediation requirements. Increased regulatory requirements regarding our existing or future wastewater disposal facilities, including the requirement to pay increased closure and post-closure costs or to establish increased financial assurance for such activities could substantially increase our operating costs and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Changes in U.S. and international trade policies, particularly involving China, may adversely impact our business and operating results. Though a comprehensive trade agreement was signed in 2020, the U.S. government has previously imposed tariffs affecting certain goods produced in China. A portion of the chemicals we use originate in China and are sold to us by our supplier partners. As a result, tariffs incurred by our supplier partners could increase our costs and reduce profitability. Additionally, delays or interruptions in the supply of some chemicals for any reason could impact our ability to generate chemicals revenue. If we are forced to source chemicals currently originating in China from other countries, such compounds might be more expensive, inferior in quality, or take longer to source. If we incur higher costs that we cannot pass on to our customers or if we are unable to adequately replace the chemicals we currently source with chemicals produced elsewhere, our business could be adversely affected. Legislation or regulatory initiatives intended to address seismic activity associated with oilfield wastewater disposal wells could restrict our ability to dispose of produced water gathered from our E&P customers and, accordingly, could have a material adverse effect on our business. We dispose of wastewater gathered from oil and gas producing E&P customers that result from their drilling and production operations pursuant to permits issued to us by government authorities overseeing such disposal activities. While these permits are issued pursuant to existing laws and regulations, these legal requirements are subject to change, which could result in increased costs of operation, the imposition of more stringent permitting or operating constraints or new monitoring and reporting requirements owing to, among other things, concerns of the public or governmental authorities regarding such disposal activities. See Part I, Item 1. “Business – Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Matters” for more discussion on these seismicity matters. Increased regulation and attention given to induced seismicity could lead to greater opposition to oil and gas activities utilizing injection wells for waste disposal. The adoption and implementation of any new laws, regulations or directives that restrict our ability to dispose of wastewater gathered from our customers by limiting, volumes, disposal rates, disposal well locations or otherwise, or requiring us to shut down disposal wells, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. We are subject to environmental and occupational health and safety laws and regulations that may expose us to significant liabilities for penalties, damages or costs of remediation or compliance. Our operations and the operations of our E&P customers are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations in the U.S. relating to protection of natural resources and the environment, health and safety aspects of our operations and waste management, including the transportation and disposal of waste and other materials. These laws and regulations may take the form of laws, regulations, executive actions and various other legal initiatives and result in the imposition of numerous obligations on our operations and the operations of our customers. See Part I, Item 1. “Business – Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Matters” for more discussion on these matters. Compliance with these regulations and other regulatory initiatives, or any other new environmental laws, regulations and executive actions could, among other things, require us or our customers to install new or modified emission controls on equipment or processes, incur longer permitting timelines, and incur significantly increased capital or operating expenditures, which costs may be significant. One or more of these developments that impact our customers could reduce demand for our services, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. 43


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    The Endangered Species Act and Migratory Bird Treaty Act govern both our and our E&P customers’ operations and additional restrictions may be imposed in the future, which constraints could have an adverse impact on our ability to expand some of our existing operations or limit our customers’ ability to develop new oil and gas wells. The ESA and comparable state laws restrict activities that may affect endangered or threatened species or their habitats. Similar protections are offered to migratory birds under the MBTA. To the degree that species listed under the ESA or similar state laws, or are protected under the MBTA, live in the areas where we or our E&P customers’ operate, both our and our customers’ abilities to conduct or expand operations and construct facilities could be limited or be forced to incur additional material costs. Additionally, the FWS may make determinations on the listing of unlisted species as endangered or threatened under the ESA. See Part I, Item 1. “Business – Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Matters” for more discussion on ESA and MBTA matters. The designation of previously unidentified endangered or threatened species could indirectly cause us to incur additional costs, cause our or our E&P customers’ operations to become subject to operating restrictions or bans and limit future development activity in affected areas, which developments could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Increasing investor attention to ESG matters may impact our business. To an increasing extent, many institutional investors have announced plans to transition their portfolios to net- zero greenhouse gas emissions over the next 2-3 decades as part of a commitment to combat climate change. This has, and will likely continue to result in some (and perhaps a growing number of) institutions removing from their portfolios the shares of companies that do not meet their minimum investment standards. Further, banks and other capital providers are reassessing their capital allocation to our industry or making their participation conditional. This trend towards the divestment or limitation of future investment in companies involved in the development, production, transportation and utilization of fossil fuels, may adversely affect the price of our stock and limit our access to the debt and equity markets for capital to fund our growth. In addition, organizations that provide proxy advisory services to investors on corporate governance and related matters have developed ratings processes for evaluating companies on their approach to ESG matters. Such ratings are used by some investors to inform their investment and voting decisions. Unfavorable ESG ratings may lead to increased negative investor sentiment toward us or our customers and to the diversion of investment to other industries, which could have a negative impact on our stock price and/or our access to and costs of capital. Risks Related to Personnel and Related Parties Our industry typically experiences a high rate of employee turnover. Any difficulty we experience replacing or adding personnel could have a material adverse effect on our operational performance, customer satisfaction, ability to retain existing business or secure new business, and therefore liquidity, results of operations and financial condition. We are dependent upon the available labor pool of skilled employees and may not be able to find enough skilled labor to meet our needs, which could have a negative effect on our growth. We are also subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act, which governs such matters as minimum wage, overtime and other working conditions. Our services require skilled workers who can perform physically demanding work. As a result of our industry volatility, pronounced declines in drilling and completions activity, as well as the demanding nature of the work, many workers have left the oilfield services section to pursue employment in different fields. If we are unable to retain or meet the growing demand for skilled technical personnel, our operating results and our ability to execute our growth strategies may be adversely affected. A national minimum wage increase to $15/hour, as proposed in the U.S. Congress, would increase our labor costs and potentially increase our turnover. We engage in transactions with related parties and such transactions present possible conflicts of interest that could have an adverse effect on us. We have historically entered into a number of transactions with related parties. Related party transactions create the possibility of conflicts of interest with regard to our management. Such a conflict could cause an individual in our 44


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    management to seek to advance his or her economic interests above ours. Further, the appearance of conflicts of interest created by related party transactions could impair the confidence of our investors. While our board of directors regularly reviews these transactions, in accordance with our Related Party Transactions policy, a related party transaction presenting a conflict of interest could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity, results of operations and financial condition. Risks Related to Our Capital Structure We do not currently pay any dividends to the holders of the Class A common stock and the availability and timing of future dividends, if any, is uncertain. We do not currently pay dividends on our Class A common stock, and consequently, in the near term, your only opportunity to achieve a return on your investment in us will be if you sell your Class A common stock at a price greater than you paid for it. There is no guarantee that the price of our Class A common stock that will prevail in the market will ever exceed the price that you pay. Additionally, our Credit Agreement places certain restrictions on our ability to pay dividends. We may amend our Credit Agreement or enter into new debt arrangements that also prohibit or restrict our ability to pay dividends on our Class A common stock. Subject to such restrictions, our board of directors will periodically review the amount and timing of stockholder dividends, if any, that we may pay in future periods. In making this determination, our directors will consider all relevant factors, including the amount of cash available for dividends, capital expenditures, covenants, prohibitions or limitations with respect to dividends, applicable law, general operational requirements and other variables. We cannot predict the amount or timing of any future dividends you may receive, and if we do commence the payment of dividends, we may be unable to pay, maintain or increase dividends over time. Therefore, you may not be able to realize any return on your investment in our Class A common stock for an extended period of time, if at all. Please read “Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities—Dividend Policy.” If we fail to maintain and enhance an effective system of internal controls, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud. As a result, current and potential stockholders could lose confidence in our financial reporting, which would harm our business and the trading price of our Class A common stock. Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports, prevent fraud and operate successfully as a public company. We are subject to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“Sarbanes-Oxley”) and therefore are required to make a formal assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting for that purpose. We cannot be certain that our efforts to maintain and enhance our internal controls will be successful, that we will be able to maintain adequate controls over our financial processes and reporting in the future or that we will be able to comply with our obligations under Sections 302 and 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley. Any failure to maintain effective internal controls, or difficulties encountered in implementing or improving our internal controls, could harm our operating results or cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations. Ineffective internal controls could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, which would likely have a negative effect on the trading price of our Class A common stock. We may incur indebtedness or issue additional equity securities to execute our long-term growth strategy, which may reduce our profitability or result in significant dilution to our stockholders. Constructing and maintaining water infrastructure used in the oil and gas industry requires significant capital. We may require additional capital in the future to develop and construct water sourcing, transfer and other related infrastructure to execute our growth strategy. For the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018, we spent $21.2 million, $110.1 million and $165.4 million, respectively, in capital expenditures (excluding expenditures connected with business combinations). Historically, we have financed these investments through cash flows from operations, external borrowings, capital contributions and proceeds from the issuance of equity securities. These sources of capital may not be available to us in the future. If we are unable to fund capital expenditures for any reason, we may not be able to capture available growth opportunities or effectively maintain our existing assets and any such failure could have a 45

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