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    Seattle Children’s Maintenance of Certification 2019 Annual Report www.seattlechildrens.org


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    __________________________________________ Our Mission We provide physicians with the opportunity for meaningful professional development to enable them to help every child live the healthiest and most fulfilling life possible. _____________________________________________________ Our Vision To be an innovative leader in professional development, research, quality improvement, medical education, and the delivery of compassionate care for children and their families. _____________________________________________________ Our History Seattle Children’s Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Program has been a member of the American Board of Medical Specialties’ (ABMS) Multi-Specialty MOC Portfolio Approval Program since 2012. Letter from our Director 99% of MOC participants agree: “This project helped me identify barriers to The Seattle Children’s Seattle MOC Children’s MOC Program Program provides seeks tovaluable improveopportunities provider to improvement” engageknowledge, physicians engagement, in quality improvement andand participation, patient skillssafety projects, in quality project helped me identify barriers to and provides them with valuable improvement (QI). We had another successful year, offering skills to improve their practice. Our program reflects the Core Values of Seattleopportunities Children’s, into collaborate particular on QI initiatives Collaboration, that enhance Innovation, and and 95% of MOC participants agree: optimize patient care. Excellence. “I can apply QI methods to improve In 2019, the projects offered through our program focused on a healthcare delivery to patients” 2019 saw… range of topics, from antibiotic prescribing practices, to We areimproving physician looking forward tosleep habits,totoempower continuing addressing issues ofand physicians equity and inclusion in the delivery of healthcare. In addition provide them with the skills to improve their practice so that they to Partare 4 MOC best able tocredit forthe provide physicians, we were highest quality pleased care to introduce for children and their 93% of MOC participants agree: Continuing Medical Education (CME) credit for Physician families. “This MOC project will directly improve the care of my own patients” Assistants (PAs). Sincerely, As we look ahead, our program will continue to engage physicians and PAs in QI projects and education, providing them with the skills to improve their practice while facing the 94% of MOC participants report: many challenges that confront us. “I would recommend Seattle Joel S. Tieder, MD, MP Children’s MOC Program to a Sincerely, colleague” Joel S. Tieder, MD, MPH


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    What is the Seattle Children’s MOC Program?  An institutional resource to improve  Engages and teaches quality improvement patient and family-centered outcomes skills to Seattle Children’s-affiliated through lifelong learning. physicians through project-based learning.  Approves and maintains a portfolio of  Awards Part 4 MOC credit to Seattle qualifying Part 4 MOC projects for nearly Children’s- affiliated physicians who all ABMS specialties. participate in MOC projects within our portfolio.  Helps Seattle Children’s establish quality  Supports and coaches qualifying QI improvement projects that meet MOC projects and QI leaders recertification requirements for faculty and affiliated physicians Content 4 Coaching 5 Program Profile 6 Project Profiles  Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI)  Improve NICU Admission Temperatures Collaboration  SHEEP  Increasing Influenza Vaccination Rates  Inpatient Reading  PCP Handoff Improvements  SCCN Asthma  Spirometry 360  Use of Individualized Provider Feedback to Improve Antibiotic Prescribing  Attending Observations of Resident Handoffs 16 Scholarly Impact


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    MOC QI Coaches Our four Quality Improvement Coaches bring diverse expertise in QI, creative thinking and research. They are the backbone to our MOC projects, support to our MOC Project Leaders and teams. MOC QI coaches:  Develop impactful and meaningful QI projects  Obtain, display, and evaluate process and outcome measures  Learn and apply QI skills  Create scholarly work when applicable Sahar Rooholamini, MD, MPH Jim Stout, MD, MPH MOC QI Coach MOC QI Coach Jimmy Beck, MD, MEd Joel Tieder MD, MPH MOC QI Coach MOC Program Director and QI coach 4


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    Maintenance of Certification Program Program Growth The Seattle Children’s MOC Program has been a Multi-Specialty MOC Portfolio Approval Program (Portfolio Program) with the American Board of Medical Specialties since 2012. The MOC program has witnessed substantial Program Director: Joel Tieder Associate Professor of growth and has expanded from offering MOC opportunities to pediatricians to Pediatrics, UW Division of all ABMS member boards. As of 2019 the SCH MOC Program has been able to Hospital Medicine offer Category 1 PI-CME credit for Physicians Assistants, thanks to a collaborative agreement between the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA) and the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) Multi-specialty MOC Portfolio Program. This year we did see a slight dip in attestations but that was partly due to the roll out of a couple very large collaborative projects that will complete in 2020. One of the projects is a national collaborative with 15 different organizations participating. We anticipate our number to raise again during Program Manager: Ashlea Tade the 2020 year. The MOC Program continues to experience large interest in physician’s self-care/reduce burnout projects and building MOC project models for large collaborative projects, regional and national. Program Coordinator: Alka Goyal 5


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    Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) "By increasing my awareness of the multitude of ways in which bias (racial, socioeconomic, gender) impacts my care of patients, this project has caused me to stop and think, to be intentional, about how best to create a therapeutic alliance with each patient and family I see." –MOC participant Project Summary The aim for this project was by November 2019, participants will improve EDI April – November awareness and actions from baseline to attestation (via survey response). Participants were asked to complete a self-assessment survey though out the 11 participants from 5 divisions course of the project. The survey was compiled of five questions: 1) When I experienced what I perceived as a culture barrier, I took steps to break down the barrier. 2) Considered how the concepts of privilege and oppression may play into my relationship with a patient/family. 3) Modeled what I learned in EDI training with junior colleagues and/or trainees. 4) Thought about cultural and/or religious assumptions that I may be making about a patient/family. 5) Thought about the benefits and burdens of a plan for patient/family. Highlight:  Winner of “Greatest Impact” award of 2019 Project Leader  Winner of “Best Project” award in 2018 Shaquita Bell, MD  Participants continue to value the opportunity to discuss with their peers about their thoughtful and meanings through the experiences of this project. Interest in scaling to national collaborative. 6


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    Improve NICUObservations Attending Admission of Temperatures Collaboration Resident Handoffs "It was most important to me to gain familiarity with the structure and concepts behind quality improvement projects, as I did not have a strong background in this area. Those concepts were modeled and reinforced during the group meetings, when the project leaders presented data and other information to our group." - MOC Participant May - November 10 participants from 4 NICUs Project Summary The aim for this project was to increase the percentage of inborn very low birth weight infants admitted to each site's NICU from the delivery room Project Leader with admission axillary temperature in goal range (36.5-37.5 °C) by 15% at Elizabeth Jacobson MD each site and to at least 65% across the network in one year, then sustain for at least 6 months. Highlights:  Unique opportunity for community physicians to participate in a Children's portfolio MOC project Project Leader  Winner of "Best QI Teaching" award in 2019 Linda Wallen MD  Engaged team who demonstrated high levels of QI learning that pl ans to continue project through 2020 7


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    SHEEP (Sleep Health: Evaluations and Expectations for Physicians) "I thought this was I am concerned about my sleep habits one of the best MOC projects I have ever participated in. We almost never get the opportunity to pause and reflect on our own self-care. The project taught me some very practical and sustainable changes that will ultimately lead to better care for my patients."–MOC participant Project Summary The aim of this project is to decrease the Likert-scaled average on three April – October questions related to sleep beliefs by 20%. This project was an innovative pilot developed in partnership with Drs. Jenny Taylor and Beth Villavicencio as part of 43 participants from 9 divisions their work in wellness for attending physicians. Following a CBT-I model, participants attended meetings, kept sleep diaries, and implemented interventions to improve their sleep. Highlight:  Winner of “Best Project” award in 2019  This project continues to be a very popular project in the Children’s portfolio with a broad range of subspecialists participating, including spread to outreach/regional clinics Project Leader  Excellent leadership coupled with engaged participants and meaningful Maida Chen, MD data Director, Pediatric Sleep Disorders Center, Seattle Children’s Hospital  Winner of “Best Project” award in 2017 Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine www.seattlechildrens.org 8


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    Increasing Influenza Vaccination Rates in Ambulatory Clinic Patients "Involving the team including the nurses and MA resulted in a better vaccination rate and understanding of some of the issues." –MOC participant September 2018 – October 2019 Project Summary 11 participants from 7 divisions The aim of this project was to ensure ≥90% coverage of influenza vaccination rates among USNWR populations in SCH outpatients. Under the leadership of Matthew “Boots” Kronman and Annika Hofstetter, this project has reached nearly all ambulatory divisions at the hospital and influenced substantial change in workflow and engagement in providers. Participants during the “off season” identify barriers and plan interventions in their clinics, and during the “on season” practice just-in- time problem solving to ensure every child is screened and has access to vaccination. Project Leader Highlight: Matthew “Boots” Kronman, MD, MSCE  This project continues to be a very popular project in the Children’s portfolio with a broad range of subspecialists participating, including spread to outreach/regional clinics  Excellent leadership coupled with engaged participants and meaningful data  Winner of “Best Project” award in 2016 Project Leader Annika Hofstetter, MD, PhD, MPH www.seattlechildrens.org 9


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    Attending Observations of Inpatient ResidentReading HandoffsProgram "I learned about the iterative process of quality improvement, how to assess impact and plan/implement changes to achieve goals/outcome measures." - MOC Participant March - September 11 participants from 7 divisions Project Summary The aim of this project was to improve rate of book delivery by at least 50% to eligible patients on general medical teams 1, 2, 3, 6/7 in six months. This project strived to improve adherence to established protocols through coaching and Project Leader evaluation of the process of getting the books to families. All participants completed the Reach Out and Read online training program, engage medical Emily Myers, MD teams to improve the rate of book delivery, and identify barriers and ideas for further improvements. Highlights:  Unique ongoing work to improve delivery of care and family experience  Survey responses collected by MOC participants gives project leaders insight as they look to expand the Reach Out and Read program to Project Leader more areas of the hospital Emily Gallagher, MD, MPH Project Leader H. Mollie Greves Grow, MD, MPH 10


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    PCP Handoff Improvement "Was great for Allegro to learn what our PCPs want for communication and to work on getting discharge summaries more consistently"– MOC participant Was Call Made Timely? May – November Previously 83% timely, overall now 85% 12 participants from 7 clinics Numerator = 83 yes responses Denominator = 98 calls to PCP Project Summary The aim of this project was to increase “Warm Handoff Rate” via phone call hospitalist to primary care provider within 48 hours of patient discharge, from 43% to 65% by September 1, 2019. Project Leader Highlight: John Schreuder, MD, FAAP  Gathered valuable feedback from PCPs to create recommendations around identifying when ‘warm’ handoffs are needed/preferred  Unique opportunity for community physicians to participate in a Children’s portfolio MOC project. www.seattlechildrens.org 11


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    Attending Observations of SCCN Asthma Resident Handoffs "The interventions improved the quality of preventative care provided to these patients and families. It empowered families to better understand when to seek clinic evaluation and treatment and how to recognize and initiate home treatment." - MOC Participant April - November Project Summary 76 participants from 8 clinics The aim for this project was to decrease asthma exacerbations* for patients 5- 18 years of age in the Seattle Children's Care Network by 5% by December 31, 2020 (group would like to capture 2 respiratory seasons) *Defined as hospitalization or emergency dept. visit for asthma, outpatient visit coded as asthma with exacerbation or status asthmaticus, outpatient visit for asthma with oral steroid. Highlights: Project Leader  Continues to be one of Children’s Portfolio largest Sheryl Morelli, MD, FAAP community participants  This meaningful project provides unique opportunity for c ommunity physicians to engage on similar outcomes 12


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    Attending Observations of Spirometry 360 Resident Handoffs "The most important concept I learned from participating in this QI Effort is how to coach a patient to perform spirometry and how to read pulmonary function testing due to the training modules that educated me on how to interpret different results."- MOC Participant Ongoing Project Summary 4 participants from 1 clinic The aim for this project was that 6 months from baseline, 60% of all spirometry tests will be of adequate quality. Spirometry 360 is a unique distance learning program to facilitate implementation of routine spirometry testing to aid in asthma management in primary care clinics. The curriculum has been implemented worldwide. MOC is offered through the Children’s portfolio for interested participants. Highlights:  Unique opportunity for community physicians to participate in a Children’s portfolio MOC project Project Leader  Spirometry continues to be a role model project for distance l earning and MOC opportunities Jim Stout, MD, MPH  Dr. Jim Stout was named the 2019 UW Medicine Inventor of the Yea r . This award recognized his work on Spirometry 360 and the impact it has had on improving health care. 13


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    Use of Individualized Provider Feedback to Improve Antibiotic Prescribing "I learned that providers are open to individualized feedback on their antibiotic prescribing and there was great engagement on what antibiotic prescribing behaviors most impact their patients. I learned we need to sit down with divisions to understand what additional behaviors they would like feedback on to improve Care.” - MOC participant July – November 8 participants from 4 divisions Project Summary Project Leaders The aim of this project was to reduce targeted clinical behaviors by 10% within each participating medical/surgical division by November 2019 Highlight:  This project was well lead and provided valuable QI activity Katie Bridger, PharmD  Participants were highly engaged and found the data to be meaningful  Great opportunity for physicians to be involved across divisions Nicole Poole, MD, MPH www.seattlechildrens.org Scott Weissman, MD 14


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    Attending Observations of Resident Handoffs: Rehabilitation Medicine When asked if this is a valuable use of Attending’s time it was rated an average of 3.8 on a scale of 1- 4 with 4 being the most valuable June - November Project Summary Two participants from one division The aim of this project was to increase the number of inpatient rehabilitation service resident/fellow hand off to overnight on call coverage on Mondays and with new patients observed by attending physicians to three times a month by November, 2019. Highlights:  Participants appreciated that the communication strategies and fel t i t would be possible to increase the aim to greater than three s ign -outs Megan Flanigan, MD per month Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine  As a result of this project, attendings will routinely observe resident Fellow, University of Washington handoffs to encourage best practices 15


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    Seattle Seattle Children’s Maintenance Maintenanceof of Certification Program Certification Program Scholarly Impact Scholarly Seattle Children’s Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Program Publications:  Tieder JS, Prall S, Beck J, Alberda E, Jensen D, Nair D, Carline J. A Survey of Perceived Effectiveness of Part 4 Maintenance of Certification. Hospital Pediatrics. Nov 2017, 7 (11) 642-648; doi: 10.1542/hpeds.2017-0029. Ancillary Services Utilization Presentations:  Using Peer Coaching to Reduce Inappropriate or Duplicate Laboratory Testing; James O’Callaghan, Kirsten Beck, Brian Cartin, Glen Tamura, Susan Hunt, Elisabeth Villavicencio, Joel Tieder o Hospital Medicine 2017 (HM17), Las Vegas, NV, May 1-4, 2017; poster presentation, presenting author James O’Callaghan o Pediatric Hospital Medicine 2017 (PHM17), Nashville, TN, July 20-23, 2107; poster presentation, presenting author James O’Callaghan Clinical Standard Work (CSW) – Diabetes Ketoacidosis (DKA) Publications:  Koves IH, Leu GM, Spencer S, Popalisky J, Drummond K, Beardsley E et al on behalf of the Diabetic Ketoacidosis Guideline Development Workgroup. Improving care for pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis care. Pediatrics 2014, Sep;134(3):e848-56. doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-3764. Epub 2014 Aug 4. Presentations:  Paris CA, Beardsley E, Zimmerman J, Koves I, Woodward T. Achieving Best Practice Care for the P at ient wit h Diabetic ketoacidosis – Consensus Process and Implementation of a Hospital Wide Guideline of Care. P os ter presentation, 1st Global Congress for Consensus in Pediatrics & Child Health. February 2011; Paris, France.  CCTR Science Day 11 April 2013, Seattle: Ismail H, Cochrane K, Paris C, Koves IH. Hypoglycemia Reduction during Diabetic Ketoacidosis with the two-bag system.  CCTR Science Day 11 April 2013, Seattle: Ildiko H. Koves, Carolyn Paris, Jean C Popalisky, Kate Drummond, Michael G Leu, Elaine Beardsley, Kristi Klee, Suzanne Spencer, Troy L McGuire, Joel S Tieder, Jerry J Zimmerman. On behalf of the Diabetic Ketoacidosis Guideline Development Workgroup. Developing an Evidence Based Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis Guideline: Lessons from a Multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Effort in the Computerized Era of Medicine  ACEP Scientific Assembly October 14-17, 2013. Seattle. Ildiko H. Koves, Carolyn Paris, Jean C Popalisky, Kate Drummond, Michael G Leu, Elaine Beardsley, Kristi Klee, Suzanne Spencer, Troy L McGuire, Joel S Tieder, Jerry J Zimmerman.. On behalf of the Diabetic Ketoacidosis Guideline Development Workgroup. Developing an Evidence Based Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis Guideline: Lessons from a Multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Effort in the Computerized Era of Medicine 16


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    Seattle Seattle Children’s Maintenance Maintenanceof of Certification Program Certification Program Scholarly Impact Scholarly  9th Joint International Meeting of Paediatric Endocrinology, 19-22 September, 2013. Milan, Italy. Heba Ismail, Katherine Cochrane, Carolyn Paris, Ildiko Koves. Hypoglycemia Reduction during Diabetic Ketoacidosis with the two-bag system.  9th Joint International Meeting of Paediatric Endocrinology, 19-22 September, 2013. Milan, Italy. Ildiko H. Koves, Carolyn Paris, Jean C Popalisky, Kate Drummond, Michael G Leu, Elaine Beardsley, Kristi Klee, Suzanne Spencer, Troy L McGuire, Joel S Tieder, Jerry J Zimmerman. On behalf of the Diabetic Ketoac idos is Guideline Development Workgroup. Developing an Evidence Based Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis Guideline: Lessons from a Multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Effort in the Computerized Era of Medicine.  2014 Pediatric Academic Societies/Asian Society for Pediatric Research (PAS/ASPR) Joint Meeting. 3 -6 May , 2014. Vancouver, Canada. Koves IH, Leu GM, Spencer S, Popalisky J, Drummond K, Beardsley E et al on behalf of the Diabetic Ketoacidosis Guideline Development Workgroup. Quality improvement methods improve safety of pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis care.  CCTR Science Day, 14 April 2015, Seattle. O’Mahony L, Wilson A, Price J, Slater A, Beardsley E, Koves I Modified fluid management plan for care of pediatric patients with diabetic ketoacidosis during air transport.  PEARL 1-2 March, 2013. Vancouver, Canada: Koves IH on behalf of the Diabetic Ketoacidosis Guideline Development Workgroup. Implementation of an institutional evidenced based DKA management guideline in t he era of electronic medicine and standardization.  DKA- A continuous infusion of improvement in the era of electronic medicine. Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, December 2013. CONNECT Presentations:  Baden H, Scott J, Schloredt K. Your Physicians Have Completed a Communication Workshop: What’s Next? Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference. March 2017.  Alberda E, Scott J. Improved Physician Engagement and Patient Experience at Seattle Children’s Hospital. American Board of Medical Specialties Annual Conference. September 2017. Cyclophosphamide Recurring Infusion Pathway Practice Improvement (CRIPPI) Publications:  Hayward K, Haaland WL, Hrachovec J, Leu M, Vora S, Clifton H, Rascoff N, Crowell CS. Reliable Pregnancy Testing Before Intravenous Cyclophosphamide: A Quality Improvement Study. Pediatrics. 2016 Dec;138(6). pii: e20160378. PubMed PMID: 27940668 Dialogue on Acute Respiratory Tract Infections (DART) Presentations:  Kronman M, Gerber J, Grundmeier R, Zhou C, Robinson J, Heritage J, Stout J, Burges D, Hedrick B, Warren L, Shalowitz M, Shone L, Steffes J, Wright M, Fiks A, Mangione-Smith R. Dialogue Around Respiratory Illness 17


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    Seattle Seattle Children’s Maintenance Maintenanceof of Certification Program Certification Program Scholarly Impact Scholarly Treatment (DART) Quality Improvement (QI) Program Reduces Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing. Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting. Baltimore, MD. April 2019. Echocardiography Appropriateness Presentations: Frandsen EL, Kourtidou S, Tieder JS, Alberda E, Soriano BD. Increasing Appropriate Use of Outpatient Echocardiography Among Pediatric Cardiologists: A Quality Improvement Initiative. Western Society of Pediatric Cardiology. Las Vegas, NV. May 2019. Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) In progress: Rooholamini SN, Bell S, Sullivan S, Tieder JS. GATHER: Improving faculty engagement in equity, diversity and inclusion using a quality improvement framework. Manuscript in preparation, 2020. Handoff Coaching Presentations:  Beck J, Oron A, Jensen D, Tieder JS. Improving Handoffs between Attending Physicians Using Direct Peer- Observation and Coaching. Pediatric Academic Society Annual Meeting. Baltimore, MD. Poster presentation. 2016  Awarded Top 3 Quality Improvement ABMS Portfolio Project for 2016. Poster and Platform presentation: Beck J, Tieder JS, et al. Handoff Improvement. American Board of Medical Specialty Quality Improvement Forum. Chicago. May 2016  Tieder JS. Invited Speaker: Handoff Improvement Workshop, AAP Annual Leadership Forum, March 2016 in Schaumberg, Illinois Head CT Utilization for Pediatric Head Trauma Patients Publications:  Jennings R, Burtner J, Pellicer J, Nair D, Bradford M, Shaffer M, Uspal N, Tieder J. Reducing Head CT Use for Children with Head Injuries in a Community Emergency Department. Pediatrics. 2017 Mar 2. pii: e20161349. doi: 10.1542/peds.2016-1349. Presentations:  “Reducing Unnecessary CTs for Children with Head Injuries in a Community Emergency Department” Rebecca M. Jennings, Jennifer J. Burtner, Joseph F. Pellicer, Deepthi K. Nair, Miranda C. Bradford, Neil G. Uspal, Joel S. Tieder. Presented at Pediatric Academic Society’s 2015 Annual Meeting, April 2015. 18


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    Seattle Seattle Children’s Maintenance Maintenanceof of Certification Program Certification Program Scholarly Impact Scholarly  “Reducing Unnecessary CTs for Children with Head Injuries in a Community Emergency Department” Rebecca M. Jennings, Jennifer J. Burtner, Joseph F. Pellicer, Deepthi K. Nair, Miranda C. Bradford, Neil G. Uspal, Joel S. Tieder. Presented at Seattle Children’s CCTR Science Day, May 2015. Hepatitis B Newborn Immunization Rate Presentations:  May 2016. Villavicencio, CE; Taylor, J “Birth Dose Hepatitis B Vaccination Rates in a Community Hospital Setting”; Pediatric Academic Societies, Poster presentation. Improving NAS in Community Hospitals Publications:  Parlaman J, Deodhar P, Sanders V, Jerome J, McDaniel CE. “Improving Care for Infants with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: A Multicenter, Community Hospital Based Study” Hosp Pediatr. 2019 Aug;9(8):608-614. doi: 10.1542/hpeds.2019-0083. Epub 2019 Jul 15 Presentations:  Parlaman J, Deodhar P, Sanders S, Jerome J, McDaniel CE. Improving Care for Infants with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: A Multicenter, Community Hospital Based Study. o Pediatric Academic Society. Baltimore, MD 2019. o Pediatric Hospital Medicine. Seattle, WA. July 2019. P-HIP (Pediatric Hospital Improvement Project) Presentations:  Esporas, M, Gidengil, C, Ward L, Britto M, Burkhart Q, Bardach N, Basco W, Brittan M, Williams D, Wood K, Yung S, Mangione-Smith R. Identifying Best Practices for Improving on Quality Measures in a Virtual Learning Collaborative. Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting. Baltimore, MD. April 2019. Rounding Coach Presentations:  Rooholamini S., Ruedinger E., LaRoche A., Starr M., Timpane S., McPhillips H. Embedding Direct Observation and Feedback into Rounds: The Rounding Coach Pilot at Seattle Children’s. Association of Pediatric Program Directors (APPD) Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA (workshop presentation), March-April 2016.  Rooholamini S., Ruedinger E., Jensen D., Tieder JS. Faculty Peer Observation and Coaching to Improve Patient- and Family-Centered Rounds. Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Annual Conference, Baltimore, MD (poster presentation) and Quality Improvement Forum, American Board of Medical Specialties Conference, Rosemont, IL (poster presentation), May 2016. 19


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    Seattle Seattle Children’s Maintenance Maintenanceof of Certification Program Certification Program Scholarly Impact Scholarly  Rooholamini S., Warner-Grant J., Tieder JS. Desperately Seeking Feedback: Development of a Faculty Coaching Program for Rounds. Pediatric Hospital Medicine (PHM) Conference, Chicago, IL (workshop presentation), July 2016.  Poster. Rooholamini S, Tieder JS, et al. Rounding Coach. American Board of Medical Specialty Quality Improvement Forum. Chicago. May 2016 20


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