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    Annual R eport 2 0 0 6 J OINT J APAN/W OR LD B ANK GR ADUAT E SCHOLAR SHIP PR OGR AM A Capacity-B uilding Initiative for Developing Countries W O RLD BA N K I N STI TU TE Promoting knowledge and learning for a better world


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    TAB LE OF CON T EN T S MISSION STATEMENT ...........................................................................................................................................................1 MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT ........................................................................................................................................2 MESSAGE FROM THE VICE PRESIDENT, WORLD BANK INSTITUTE ....................................................................................3 THE PROGRAM’S TIES TO JAPAN .........................................................................................................................................5 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION ......................................................................................................................................................7 The Regular Program .....................................................................................................................................................7 The Partnership Programs ..............................................................................................................................................7 PROGRAM PERFORMANCE IN 2006 .....................................................................................................................................8 Applications to the Regular Program .....................................................................................................................8 Profile of New Scholars .......................................................................................................................................10 Scholars Graduated in 2006 ...............................................................................................................................14 SCALING-UP TO STRENGTHEN KNOWLEDGE-SHARING AND TO NURTURE CAPACITY-BUILDING ................................16 Regional Conference in Nairobi.....................................................................................................................................16 Regional Conference in Hanoi ......................................................................................................................................17 Development of the Community Network .....................................................................................................................18 NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN 2006............................................................................................................................................19 Limitation of the Number of Host Institutions Eligible to the Regular Program...............................................................19 Tax Programs Partnerships Renewal ............................................................................................................................19 Visits to Partner Universities..........................................................................................................................................19 Japan..................................................................................................................................................................19 Harvard University ...............................................................................................................................................19 Columbia University.............................................................................................................................................20 University of Cocody (Abidjan).............................................................................................................................20 The EPM Phase III Planning Meeting (Abidjan, July 2006) ...................................................................................20 PROGRAM FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE ..............................................................................................................................22 DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMS...........................................................................................24 Programs in Africa ........................................................................................................................................................24 Programs in Japan .......................................................................................................................................................25 Programs in the United States......................................................................................................................................28 PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION ................................................................................................................INSIDE BACK COVER BOX ES, TABLES AND FIGURES BOX 1 Web Site and Electronic Applications ..................................................................................................................18 BOX 2 The Economic Policy Management Program: An African Capacity Building Initiative ..................................................................................................................21 TABLE 1 JJ/WBGSP Scholars in Regular and Partnership Programs, 1987-2006 ...............................................................6 TABLE 2 Development Themes, 2006 ...............................................................................................................................13 TABLE 3 Japan’s Allocation to JJ/WBGSP, FY88–FY06 (in US$)........................................................................................22 FIGURE 1 JJ/WBGSP Applicants and Awards, 2000–06 .......................................................................................................9 FIGURE 2 Profile of Applicants by Ineligibility Criteria, 2006 ...................................................................................................9 FIGURE 3 JJ/WBGSP Regular and Partnership Program Awardees, 1987–2006 ................................................................11 FIGURE 4 Regular and Partnership Programs Awards: Distribution by Home Region, 2006.....................................................................................................................11 FIGURE 5 Profile of Scholars by Gender, 1987–2006 ..........................................................................................................11 FIGURE 6 Profile of Scholars by Parents’ Education Level, 2006.........................................................................................11 FIGURE 7 Profile of Scholars by Employment Category, 2006 .............................................................................................13 FIGURE 8 Profile of Scholars by Host Region, 2006 ............................................................................................................13 FIGURE 9 Number of Graduates per Gender, 2006 .............................................................................................................14 FIGURE 10 Number of Graduates per Home Region, 2006...................................................................................................15 FIGURE 11 Number of Graduates per Host Region, 2006 .....................................................................................................15 FIGURE 12 Number of Graduates per Field of Study, 2006 ...................................................................................................15 FIGURE 13 Main Components of JJ/WBGSP Budget for FY06 .............................................................................................23 STATISTICAL APPENDIX TABLE A1 Regular Program Applicants: Distribution by Region and Gender, 1987-2006 .....................................................30 TABLE A2 Regular Program Applicants: Distribution by Region and Country, 1987-2006 ....................................................31 TABLE A3 JJ/WBGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Gender, 1987-2006 ...............................................36 TABLE A4 JJ/WBGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Country, 1987-2006 ..............................................37


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    MI SSI ON S T AT E M E N T The World Bank has long recognized that the development of human resources— and hence of institutions— is the most impor- tant factor in promoting sustainable economic development. The J oint J apan/World Bank Graduate Scholarship Program awards scholarships for graduate studies to well-qualified, mid-career professionals, who are then expected to apply and to disseminate their newly acquired knowledge and skills in promoting the socioeconomic development of their own and other developing countries. 1


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    ME SSAG E F R O M T H E P R E SI D E N T O ver the past twenty years, the joint Japan/World Bank Graduate Scholarship Program (JJ/WBGSP) has played a critical role in capacity development by providing valuable learning opportunities to more than 3,500 students from the developing world. Thanks to the JJ/WBGSP sponsorship, almost four hundred mid-career professionals and policy- makers from over 100 countries have graduated this year, from leading universities all around the globe. With the knowledge and skills they acquired through graduate studies in fields such as economics, public policy, environment, health, and education, as well as the networking and contacts they have developed while learning, it is our hope that they will contribute more effectively to development and progress in their own countries. Recognizing that Africa faces many daunting challenges, the World Bank and the Government of Japan awarded more than 45% of the JJ/WBGSP scholarships to African candidates. The JJ/WBGSP is also contributing to institutional capacity building in Africa, through partnership with universities in Cote d’Ivoire, Cameroon, Ghana and Uganda. With a joint support from JJ/WBGSP and the African Capacity Building Foundation, these institutions are now hosting more than 120 scholars. The capacity of the universities as well as of the participants is hence jointly enhanced. The World Bank is committed to support good governance with capacity development and the other resources needed to strengthen public and civil institutions. Developing tomorrow’s leaders is a major contribution to the development of our client countries and a key element for success in the fights against poverty and corruption. I am pleased to report that, for the first time, more than 80% of the JJ/WBGSP scholarships were awarded to public servants and other professionals from the public sector. These achievements were made possible with the generous support of the Government of Japan, which has provided full funding for this program with increasing contributions totaling more than $160 million over the twenty years of the program’s existence. On behalf of the World Bank Group, I wish to thank the Government and people of Japan for their out- standing contribution in helping build knowledge and skills among future leaders and decision makers of the developing world. I also would like to wish great success to the awardees of this year’s scholarships in their pursuit of learning so that they can help their countries achieve development results. Paul Wolfowitz President, The World Bank 2


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    ME SSAG E F R O M T H E V I CE P R E SI D E N T, W O R LD B AN K I N ST I T U T E T he World Bank Institute (WBI) is one of the World Bank’s main instruments for developing capacity through the exchange of knowledge and learning. In 2006, more than 90,000 participants took part in training and capacity development activities organized by WBI through its global, regional and country programs. The JJ/WBGSP complements WBI capacity development activities by providing opportunities for graduate studies to young and promising professionals from developing countries. This year, JJ/WBGSP awarded 161 new scholarships through a highly competitive process to which more than 4,000 mid-career professionals applied from more than 130 countries. In line with WBI’s capacity development efforts, the program offered fifty five percent of the awards to candidates coming from the poorest and neediest countries including WBI’s focus countries. The program also includes partnerships with universities in Africa, Japan and the US. The JJ/WBGSP helped, in collaboration with the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF), to establish a Master’s degree program in Economic Policy Management (EPM) delivered by four African universities. Since 1998, the EPM program trained more than 950 mid-career professionals coming from 32 African countries. This program aims to scale up and speed up capacity development beyond training of individuals by focusing on building up the in-country learning infrastructure. On behalf of JJ/WBGSP alumni, scholars and the countries they represent, I would like to express my deep appreciation to the Government of Japan for its continuous commitment to world development and for its generous and sustained support to the JJ/WBGSP. I would like to wish great success to the scholarship awardees and the partnership universities in their contribution to development. Frannie A. Leautier Vice President, World Bank Institute 3


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    Thank You J apanese government had made positive contributions to Chinese economic development during the past 20 years through official development assistance. I regard this opportunity to study here in J apan as an expansion of friendly cooperative relationship between our Thank You By providing me with financial support, two countries. I’ll be back to work in Ministry of Commerce, China to contribute to the further integration of China into world economy and the Government of Japan has made this year a wonderful time in my life, by making me cooperation between China and other countries. realize my dream of studying for a master’s BIN Tang, China degree out of my country. After completing the program, I will be going back to my country and resume my job in the Ministry I hope to make the most out of my acquired of Finance of El Salvador. My goal will be knowledge and experience when I return to my to apply the new knowledge I have acquired country Lebanon after the end of the program. to the analysis and formulation of appropriate I would like to express my gratitude to the policies oriented to poverty reduction and to Government of Japan for having given me this spur economic growth. opportunity, because it wouldn’t have been Jerson Rogelio Posada M., El Salvador possible for me to cover the expenses of the program on my own. Leila Abou Nehme Sawaya, Lebanon As a citizen from a poor developing country, Vietnam, the opportunity for studying at the world-top university like Harvard University J ’ai l’honneur d’adresser à travers vous toute would only be a dream. The generosity of ma gratitude à l’endroit du Gouvernement the Government of J apan has made this J aponais et de la Banque mondiale qui ont dream of mine come true. I would like once bien voulu mettre en place ce programme de again to convey my deepest thanks to the bourses. Mon souhait personnel est que ce Government of J apan for the opportunity it programme puisse perdurer afin d’aider has granted me in pursuing the International davantage les pays en développement qui ne Development program at the Kennedy School disposent pas de moyens financiers suffisants of Government. pour renforcer les compétences de leurs cadres. T hang Khuong, Vietnam Judes Bissakonou, République Centrafricaine I would like to thank the Government of Japan and the World Bank to help me, by this Thank You scholarship to continue my study in Local Development in France. For me, this study builds my capacity and then I will be able to help my country which is very poor and among the poorest countries in Africa. Romain Guéléo Ndouba, Chad 4


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    T H E P R O G R AM’S T I E S T O J APAN T he Joint Japan/World Bank Graduate Scholarship Program (JJ/WBGSP) has its origins in Japan’s meteoric economic growth, which resulted in its astonishing transformation from World Bank borrower to major World Bank donor in a short period of time. When Japan joined the World Bank in 1952, the postwar nation was on the way to catching up with the developed countries. Between 1953 and 1966, Japan borrowed $850 million from the World Bank to develop modern highways, the bullet train system, and other projects. At one point, Japan was the Bank’s second largest borrower. “We have been striving to build modern Japan as it is, by implementing appropriate economic policies,” the Honorable Ryutaro Hashimoto, then Minister of Finance and later Prime Minister of Japan, explained at the World Bank–IMF annual meeting in 1989. During its development process, Japan, a nation without any natural resources, became “fully aware of the importance of human resources.” Mr. Hashimoto announced, “Japan’s loans from the Bank will be fully repaid in July 1990.” And he added, “Hoping that the developing countries will find something meaningful in this Japanese experience, I am pleased to announce that Japan is now prepared to contribute a total of about $300 million to the Bank over a 3-year period.” This program, which started in 1987, was expanded substantially by the Policy and Human Resources Development Fund (PHRD), a Japanese initiative established following Mr. Hashimoto’s announcement to provide special assistance that would strengthen human resources in developing countries. Over the years, Japan has expanded its commitment to this endeavor. Meanwhile, it has contributed more than $174 million to the program. Those funds have covered tuition, subsistence, insurance, and travel costs for scholars, as well as the costs of program administration. This generous program enabled scholars from all the recipient countries to study almost anywhere in the World Bank’s member countries. Five Partnership Programs were launched in four universities in Japan starting in 1995. One—at Yokohama National University—draws on Japan’s special expertise in infrastructure development. Another—at the University of Tsukuba—focuses on policy management. Three others—at Keio University, Yokohama National University, and Saitama University/Graduate Institute of Policy Studies (GRIPS)—specialize in tax policy with practical training provided to the scholars by the National Tax College. These initiatives augment Japan’s firm commitment to human resources development in the developing world. 5


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    Graduation at Columbia University. TABLE JJ/W BGSP SCHOLARS IN REGULAR 1 AND PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMS, 1987 - 2006 R E G U LAR PART N E R SH I P PR OG R AM PR OG R AMS Years Columbia McGill CERDI Tsukuba YNU- Keio YNU- GRIPS Abidjan- Yaounde II Makerere Ghana Harvard Subtotal Grand INFRA TAX Cocody by Year Total 1987 32 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 32 1988 58 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 58 1989 54 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 54 1990 90 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 90 1991 87 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 87 1992 106 23 - - - - - - - - - - - 23 129 1993 117 26 - - - - - - - - - - - 26 143 1994 102 24 11 11 - - - - - - - - - - 46 148 1995 111 26 8 8 9 9 - - - - - - - - 60 171 1996 116 25 - 8 - - 5 10 - - - - - - 48 164 1997 122 24 8 - 10 15 5 - 5 - - - - - 67 189 1998 146 23 - - - - 5 10 5 6 7 6 5 - 67 213 1999 179 22 - - 10 15 5 - 5 - - 7 6 12 82 261 2000 274 15 - - - - 5 10 5 7 7 7 7 14 77 351 2001 107 15 - - 10 15 5 - 5 7 7 7 7 15 93 200 2002 117 14 - - - - 5 4 5 7 7 7 7 9 65 182 2003 272 13 - - 10 14 5 5 5 7 7 7 - 14 87 359 2004 303 13 - - - - 5 5 5 7 7 6 7 15 70 373 2005 95 12 10 15 5 5 5 7 7 6 7 15 94 189 2006 98 12 5 5 5 7 7 7 7 8 63 161 Subtotal by Program 2,586 287 27 27 59 83 55 54 50 55 56 60 53 102 968 3,554 6


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    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION master’s level. The study areas have mostly included economics, public policy and administration, natural The JJ/WBGSP was initiated 19 years ago by the government resources and environmental management, agriculture and of Japan to encourage and strengthen human resources rural development, urban and regional planning, public health, development in developing countries. The program mandate population, and education. During 1987–2006, 2,586 schol- is to provide to midcareer professionals in developing arships have been awarded under the Regular Program. countries an exposure to the latest techniques and knowledge available through graduate studies. Upon completion of Applications for the Regular Program scholarships are their studies, the scholars are expected to return to their directly submitted to the JJ/WBGSP Secretariat and are home countries so they can apply and disseminate their processed through a multilevel screening process involving newly acquired knowledge and skills to enhance the independent external reviews. The final award is made by socioeconomic development of their communities and the Steering Committee, which takes into account the countries. Since its inception in 1987, the JJ/WBGSP has geographical and gender balances, as well as the awarded a total of 3,554 scholarships for studying in 250 socioeconomic background of applicants. This process is universities in 32 World Bank member countries. highly competitive and has had a selection rate of less than 5 percent in 2006. The effect of the JJ/WBGSP is assessed through biannual tracer studies that are aimed at tracking the program’s alumni. The Partnership Programs The latest study, undertaken in 2004, showed that 97 percent of the analyzed scholars attained their degrees and that 83 Since 1992, a number of Partnership Programs have been percent returned to their home or other developing countries. launched by the JJ/WBGSP in cooperation with selected Moreover, the effect on the development environment, as universities. Those programs enable the scholars to receive measured by the type of employment institution, showed specialized graduate training in specific themes related to that more than half of the scholars returned to work in the economics and public policy management, public finance public sector, while one-third of the scholars returned to and taxation policy, and infrastructure management. In work at universities and the private sector. addition, the Economic Policy Management (EPM) Program, which was launched in 1998 jointly with the The JJ/WBGSP program is administered through a African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF), aims at Steering Committee, which oversees the general policy of strengthening the institutional and human capacity in four the program and awards the scholarships. The manage- African universities. During 1992–2006, the partnership ment of the program is carried out by the permanent programs provided 968 scholarships for applicants to Secretariat maintained at the World Bank Institute (WBI). study in 12 institutions in Cameroon, Canada, Côte d’Ivoire, France, Ghana, Japan, Uganda, and the United States. The JJ/WBGSP conducts its operations through two schemes: the Regular Program and the Partnership Applications for the Partnership Programs scholarship Programs. are submitted to the partner universities, which process a preselection on the basis of both their own admission The Regular Program criteria and the JJ/WBGSP eligibility conditions. The final award is made by the Steering Committee, which takes This program is very flexible and allows the scholars from into account the geographical and gender balances, as the World Bank’s borrowing countries to study in host well as the socioeconomic background of applicants. universities of World Bank member countries, except their home countries. Scholars may pursue a graduate study program in any socioeconomic development field at the 7


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    Alumni Voices Ms. Nasreen Nawaz, Pakistan Program in Public Policy and Taxation, Yokohama National University, 2004 PROGRAM PERFORMANCE IN 2006 To express one’s emotions is difficult, but far more difficult During the academic year 2005/6, the program supported a is to leave unsaid the words really needed to be uttered. I total number of 331 scholars, of which 211 scholars benefited still remember in my vivid memory the day I landed in from the Regular Program and 120 were sponsored through J apan. Since that day I have been learning not just in the the Partnership Programs. During the same year, 377 scholars classrooms but everywhere— on the roads, railway stations, completed their scholarships and were graduated from their banks, hospitals, shopping malls, and so forth. host universities. By June 2006, the JJ/WBGSP Steering Committee had awarded 161 new scholarships for studies to start in academic year 2006/7. Each and every place in Japan was a learning place for me. The words such as kindness, courtesy, cleanliness, effectiveness, effi- Applications to the Regular Program ciency, hard work, and principles are no more just bookish terms. Sir Winston Churchill said, “We make a living by what The total number of applications received for the JJ/WBGSP we get; we make a life by what we give.” No doubt, Japan has Regular Program for the academic year 2006/7 was almost the same as in the previous year. Figure 1 shows that the touched thousands of lives. I really feel myself lucky and proud number of applications has stabilized over the past 3 years to to be one of those, and I am sure all my friends feel the same. around 3,400 applications per year. It should be noted that the decline observed in 2002 was a result of the requirement Our teachers at Yokohama National University not only gave of unconditional admission to a master’s degree program us knowledge, but also gave us the real education and the abil- added to the eligibility criteria in that year. The larger part of ity to think, to understand, to analyze, and to apply. They gave applicants (66 percent) come from sub-Saharan African us the strength, courage, confidence, and ability to do our best countries. The number of applicants from that region has been steadily increasing over the past 5 years, from 1,542 and prove ourselves. Their kind words didn’t cost much, but applicants in 2002 to 2,226 in 2006 (see table A1). The other always maximized our achievements, and let me assure you, notable fact is the decrease of applications coming from Europe they really accomplished their task. I can state clearly that and Central Asia (ECA), Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), being able to give to their students without the expectation of and Middle East and North Africa (MNA) regions. The total num- any return, any reward, or any notice has always been a spe- ber of female candidates was 912, representing 27 percent of cial quality of all of my teachers. the total number of applicants. This number has been increasing slightly since 2002 (761 applicants). I certainly appreciate the financial support provided by the JJ/WBGSP, which provided income to supplement our studies and had a positive effect on our lives. The great Gandhi said, “We must be the change; we wish to see in the world.” I hope that we will be an active part of the change and will try our best to bring about the change that all of us wish to see in the world. I would like to express my heartfelt gratitude to all my teachers at Yokohama National University and my worthy instructors from National Tax College and National Tax Agency of Japan for all their kind help and support. Thank you very much to all. Arigato gozaimashita!! 8


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    JJ/WBGSP scholars from Yokohama National University Infrastructure Management Program visit Kurobe Dam, November 2005. FIGURE 1. JJ/W BGSP Applicants and Awards, 2000–06 5,000 4,500 4,000 Applicants 3,500 3,000 2,500 Eligibles 2,000 1,500 1,000 Awardees 500 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 YEAR Of 3,379 applicants from 104 countries for the year 2006, FIGURE 2. Profile of Applicants by Ineligibility Criteria, 2006 2,027 fully met the eligibility criteria. It is worth mentioning that despite the decrease in the ineligibility rate, the number of ineligible applications received by the program is still rel- atively high. In 2006, a total of 1,352 applicants (40 percent of all applicants) were ineligible—mainly because they proposed a noneligible program of study (36 percent of Incomplete Work Experience ineligible applicants), submitted an incomplete application Application 20% 28% package (28 percent) or did not fulfill the work experience requirement (20 percent). (See figure 2.) Nationality 5% Field of Study Age 27% 11% Degree 9% 9


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    Alumni Voices Profile of New Scholars In June 2006, the JJ/WBGSP Steering Committee awarded 161 new scholarships: 98 for the Regular Program and 63 for the Partnership Programs. The total number of scholar- Ms. Linda Asamoah-Dabri Ghana ships awarded by the program since 1987 reached 3,554 Gender Studies, University of Leeds, 2004 scholarships, of which 2,586 scholarships were awarded under the Regular Program and 968 scholarships were provided through the Partnership Programs. (See figure 3.) I am the gender focal person for the Ghana Health Service (GHS), a government agency that is responsible for health GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION. service provision in Ghana. As a gender focal person, my job The regional distribution of the new scholars in 2006 is description includes providing policy direction for gender Africa (46 percent), East Asia and Pacific (15 percent), issues within the health sector. Currently, I am reviewing Europe and Central Asia (7 percent), Latin America and an existing policy on gender mainstreaming for the health Caribbean (11 percent), Middle East and North Africa (5 percent), South Asia (7 percent), and Japan (9 percent). As sector, as well as developing policies to address the gender shown in figure 4, an increasing emphasis is put on Africa biases in the health care delivery system in Ghana. Before and East Asia from which originated 61 percent of the new this position, I was the deputy gender focal person, and I scholars in 2006. have contributed to the development of policies such as the health sector gender policy, national HIV/AIDS policy, and GENDER DISTRIBUTION. reproductive health policy. The program has constantly given priority to female candi- dates. Although only about 27 percent of the total eligible candidates to the Regular Program were females, their share Working within a male-dominated organization where among the new scholars in 2006 was almost 45 percent. gender issues have little value, I used to face a lot of This share has been increasing over the past 10 years, as challenges in trying to push for the incorporation of gender shown in figure 5. issues into policies and programs of the GHS before the J oint J apan/World Bank G raduate Scholarship Program SOCIOECONOMIC BACKGROUND. (JJ/WBGSP) awarded me a scholarship to pursue the gender The program has increasingly drawn candidates from humble backgrounds. The socioeconomic status of scholars is studies program at the University of Leeds. Being part of assessed through a proxy: the highest education level this all-important program has afforded me the needed obtained by scholars’ parents. In 2006, more than 64 percent exposure into new development and current debates on gender of the new scholars in the Regular Program came from issues. It has also enhanced my advocacy and negotiating skills. humble and poor backgrounds, where the parents had The issue of gender and health is high on the government of education levels of high school or lower (figure 6). Ghana’s agenda for development because gender tends to influence people’s access to health care, which can have a tremendous effect on development. I owe whatever I have achieved today to the J J /WBGSP. 10


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    FIGURE 3. JJ/WBGSP Regular and Partnership Program Awardees, 1987–2006 FIGURE 4. Regular and Partnership Program Awards: Distribution by Home Region, 2006 400 9% 350 7% 300 5% 250 11% 46% 200 7% 150 15% 100 50 Africa 0 EAP 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 ECA LAC 1987-2006 Partnership MNA South Asia Regular Program Japan FIGURE 5. Profile of Scholars by Gender, 1987–2006 FIGURE 6. Profile of Scholars by Parents’ Education Level, 2006 90 80 70 No Greater than High School Education 60 13% Education 36% 50 40 30 20 10 0 '87 '88 '89 '90 '91 '92 '93 '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 High School Primary Education Education 1987-2006 39% 12% Female Male 11


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    Alumni Voices PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND. Figure 7 shows that 82 percent of new scholars in 2006 serve Dr. Kyawt Sann-Lwin, Myanmar in the public sector in their countries, 6 percent work for non- Public Administration—Mason Program, governmental organizations (NGOs), and another 6 percent work for regional or international organizations (R/IO). The Harvard University, 2004 share of scholars coming from the public sector is significant- ly higher than the average of recent years. This emphasis I graduated from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at shows how the program is supporting institutional capacity- Harvard University in June 2005. Before the study, I have building through human resources development in the public been working at the Department of Health Planning in sector and through other development-focused organizations. Myanmar for 13 years as a research officer and later as an assistant director. As my career advanced, I realized that I need FIELDS OF STUDY. The majority of scholars (65.8 percent) studied economics, wider perspectives and more skills in leadership, management, international development, and public policy, followed by and quantitative analysis. Thus, I applied for the Master’s of environment and natural resources (9.9 percent), public Public Administration course from the Kennedy School of health (9.9 percent), and education (2.5 percent). Both shares Government and for a scholarship from JJ/WBGSP. of agriculture and rural development (2.4 percent), and urban/regional development (3.2 percent) have decreased Now, one year after coming back from my study, I am still compared with previous years (table 2). In many cases, scholars are pursuing degrees in fields directly related to working at the same department and taking the same duties poverty reduction. and responsibilities. But now I have quite different perspectives. I have a wider vision and can mobilize people and evaluate HOST INSTITUTIONS. policy more effectively. I know how to make alliances with Looking at where the scholars were applying (figure 8) shows civil societies to mobilize resources for my country’s health that more than two-thirds of the new scholars were admitted development, and because of my improved management to either European or North American universities. Europe skills, I can implement the assigned job more effectively. remains the first destination (65 scholars, or 40 percent of total scholars), which it has been since 1999. The number of scholars in East Asia was relatively low because 2006 was As a developing country, Myanmar finds it very difficult to not an intake year for some of the Partnership Programs send someone to study abroad because of very limited in Japan. It is worth mentioning that the African partnership resources. However, JJ/WBGSP has committed to supporting programs allowed the JJ/WBGSP to support 29 scholars developing countries by selecting and supporting the students (18 percent) to attend universities in Africa. who have a potential to help the country realize its development goals. I am very grateful to J J /WBGSP for supporting me as I studied in the MPA program, and I will try my best to develop my country by using the skills and experiences I got from my study. 12


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    JJ/WBGSP scholars from Yokohama National University Infrastructure Management Program. TABLE 2 D E V E LO P ME N T T H E ME S, 2 0 0 6 NUMBER OF % DEVELOPMENT THEMES SCHOLARSHIPS, 2006 Economics 73 45. 3 Environment/Natural Resources 16 9. 9 Public Policy, International Development 33 20. 5 Public Health 16 9. 9 Urban/Regional Planning 3 1. 9 Education 4 2. 5 Agriculture 2 1. 2 Rural Development 2 1. 2 Other (Poverty Reduction, Media, IT, etc. ) 12 7. 5 Total 161 (100) FIGURE 7. Profile of Scholars by FIGURE 8. Profile of Scholars by Employment Category, 2006 Host Region, 2006 6% 2% 1% 6% 18% Africa Public Sector 29% EAP Private Sector 4% Europe R/IO 10% 1% LAC NGO 1% MNA Other North America 82% Oceana 40% 13


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    Alumni Voices Mr. Mahendra Prasad Khanal, Nepal Agribusiness, University of Melbourne, 2001 After graduating from Tribhuvan University, Nepal, with a bachelor’s degree in Agriculture (1993) and bachelor’s degree A JJ/WBGSP Scholar at Williams College, Western Massachusetts, USA. in Business Administration (1988), I obtained a master’s in Agribusiness from the University of Melbourne as a JJ/WBGSP scholar in 2002. Scholars Graduated in 2006 During fiscal 2006 (July 2005–June 2006), 377 scholars As a research student, I undertook a project titled “An completed their studies and were graduated from their Economic Analysis of Improvements to the Marketing respective universities. Figures 9 to 12 provide the charac- Arrangements of High Value Crops in Nepal” in Melbourne. teristics of the 2005/6 graduates. The main highlights are these: I have been working for the government of Nepal as a permanent employee since December 1995. Agricultural • Of the 377 graduates, 148 (39 percent) were female. • Most graduates originated from sub-Saharan Africa (43 program planning, program implementation, monitoring, percent), followed by East Asia and Pacific (15 percent), and evaluation are the areas of my expertise. I was transferred and Latin America and the Caribbean (14 percent). to the ministry from the district within a month of resuming • Of the 377 scholars, 205 (54 percent) graduated from my former job and was assigned to work in the fertilizer sector, European universities. which is an important component of agribusiness. Also the • The main fields of studies of graduates were economics current job of monitoring and evaluating priority and foreign (28 percent), public policy/international development (28 aided projects is vital for the overall agricultural development percent), and environment/natural resources (17 percent). of Nepal, where I am using my knowledge and the skills acquired from the study. FIGURE 9. Number of Graduates per Gender, 2006 I am very much grateful to the J J /WBGSP for providing me the opportunity to study in a world-renowned university and to undertake research in a fully equipped environment. The study helped me to broaden my understanding in the Male subject matter and to develop an ability to undertake addi- 148 Female tional research. 229 14


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    FIGURE 10. Number of Graduates per Home Region, 2006 19 28 Africa 24 EAP ECA 52 LAC MNA 162 South Asia 35 Industrialized 57 FIGURE 11. Number of Graduates per Host Region, 2006 9 33 88 Africa 36 EAP 2 Europe 4 LAC MNA North America Oceana 205 FIGURE 12. Number of Graduates per Field of Study, 2006 Economics 3 5 28 15 Environment/Natural Resources 4 106 13 Public Policy/International Development Public Health 34 Urban/Regional Development Education Agriculture 63 Population 106 Rural Development Other Fields 15


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    Alumni Voices SCALING-UP TO STRENGTHEN KNOWLEDGE-SHARING AND TO NURTURE CAPACITY-BUILDING In 2005, the JJ/WBGSP launched the Scaling-Up Program as a means to better leverage knowledge and to foster a network of development practitioners, including JJ/WBGSP scholars Mr. Edgar D. Ruiz Silva, Mexico and alumni. The JJ/WBGSP has been providing opportunities Information Systems Management, for scholars to generate new knowledge for development. The World Bank recognizes that there is a great opportunity to tap Carnegie Mellon University, 2004 into this knowledge, which would benefit not only the scholars but also the development community. During its first year of First of all, I would like to thank the JJ/WBGSP, not only for activity, the Scaling-Up Program held two regional conferences giving me the opportunity to study in one of the best universities and started developing the community of scholars and alumni. in the world but also for letting me share experience and The regional conferences, both held in May 2006, provided an knowledge with people from all over the world. It has been the opportunity for alumni to hear outstanding papers presented by most enriching experience in my life, and without JJ/WBGSP’s the scholars, network, share knowledge, and discuss current development issues. The six selected papers will be published invaluable support, I would not have achieved so much. by WBI in 2007. In December 2005, I graduated with the highest distinction These regional conferences in Kenya and Vietnam launched from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in Pittsburgh, the program’s community network in those countries. All of Pennsylvania, receiving a master’s degree in Information the six presenters, in Nairobi and Hanoi, now occupy high Systems Management. This interdisciplinary master’s course positions in government organizations in their home countries and have committed themselves to keep the network alive. of study joins computer science, management, and business to Participants affirmed that it was important to facilitate this dia- provide a broad view of information technologies. During logue among development practitioners and scholars in a my stay in CMU, I met brilliant people from different cultures sustainable manner and not just as a one-time incident at and different backgrounds. I lived with them, studied with such events. Face-to-face interaction renewed commitments them, and, most important, learned from them. I took courses by each participant for further efforts to make this program’s with excellent faculty members from whom I learned the hot scaling-up activities more effective. topics in my area— topics I use each day in my current job. Regional Conference in Nairobi Definitely, J J /WBGSP has helped me to grow up not only as a professional but also as a human being. The first conference, which marked the new scaling-up initiative, was held in Nairobi, Kenya, with the active partici- On J anuary 2006, I returned to my previous work in Banco pation of the Bank’s Country Director and the country team. de México. Since then, I have been leading IT projects to The 40 participants ranged widely: JJ/WBGSP alumni, automate the current processes done in our area, thus taking professors from the Partnership Programs and the local universities, government officials from Kenya and Japan, advantage of the high-end technologies available on the local media, and other development professionals, including market. From my experience, I have realized that the master’s the World Bank staff members. The three alumni who were degree for which I studied has helped me to improve drastically recognized for the outstanding papers prepared for their the management skills I was lacking, and it also reinforced master’s degrees presented their findings and were awarded my technical skills. prizes. The subjects were “Determinants of Health Status in Kenya”; “The Long-Run Effects of Fiscal Deficit on Economic Growth in Ghana, 1970–2000”; and “Determinants of Trade Balance in Tanzania, 1970–2002.” 16


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    Several presentations, addressing development in Africa in particular, were also made, including the following: “African Development and Japan’s Partnership” by His Excellency Mr. Satoru Miyamura, Japanese Mr. Joseph Stiglitz talking with JJ/WBGSP scholar, Ambassador to Kenya; “Selected Issues in Growth and Poverty Reduction Ms. Matondang Elsa Siburian at the ABCDE conference, in Africa” by Mr. Colin Bruce; and “Lessons from Japanese Experience in Tokyo 2006. Improving Competitiveness (Knowledge Economy)” by Mr. Tsutomu Shibata, Senior Adviser, WBI. The Honorable Mwiria Kilemi, Assistant Minister for Higher and Technical Education in Kenya; Mr. Satoru Miyamura; and Mr. Toshio Oya, the Alternate Executive Director for Japan, acknowledged the contributions of this scholarship program. “I strongly hope that the joint scholarship program, by allowing its scholars to study in graduate programs at some of the most prestigious universities around the JJ/WBGSP graduates receiving an award from world, will continue to empower many African countries to work in Mr. Toshio Oya, Alternate partnership with the donors on a level playing field,” said Mr. Miyamura. Executive Director of Japan (right), at the African Regional Regional Conference in Hanoi Conference, Nairobi, Kenya, May 2006. Two weeks after the conference in Nairobi, the program held its Asian Regional Conference in Hanoi, Vietnam. Participants numbered 70, including 24 alumni from Vietnam. At the Asian Regional Conference, which was organized with the country office, the awards were grant- ed for the following outstanding papers: “A Study of Roadside Slope African Regional Management in Bhutan”; “Adaptability of E-Government Policy in Conference, Nairobi, Mongolia: Comparative Study with Japan”; and “Responses to Kenya, May 2006 Poverty and Risks in Vietnam: How Effectively Can the Current Public Safety Net Target?” Also, distinguished development professionals shared their views of development in Vietnam and in the rest of Asia: “Human Capacity and the Development of Vietnam Agriculture and Rural Sector” by His Excellency Mr. Cao Duc Phat, Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development; “The World Bank Strategy towards Vietnam” by Mr. Klaus Rohland, Country Director, World Bank Office, Hanoi; and “Japanese Official Development Assistance Strategy in Vietnam” by Mr. Daisuke Matsunaga, Minister, Embassy of Japan in Vietnam. Commenting on this presentation, Mr. Yoshio Okubo, who was Asian Regional Conference, Hanoi, Executive Director representing Japan at the time, noted that the Vietnam, May 2006. “Joint Japan/World Bank Graduate Scholarship Program is one of the most important and flexible programs that are carried on in partnership between the World Bank and the government of Japan. The program 7 gives these potential leaders a chance to obtain appropriate knowledge and skills that would help improve their own lives, as well as the development of their home countries.” 17


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    WEB SITE AND ELECTRONIC His Excellency Mr. Cao Duc Phat, who had completed a APPLICATIONS master’s in Public Administration at Harvard University in 1993 under the JJ/WBGSP, also addressed the conference. To further enhance its outreach efforts, the JJ/WBGSP “The world is changing very fast and becoming more and launched its Web site in 2001. In addition to providing more dependent on each other,” said Mr. Phat. “We need to information on the nature of the scholarships through exchange information and ideas and to learn from each Regular and Partnerships Programs, applications can be other. This new initiative will be especially helpful for countries downloaded directly from the Web site. like Vietnam, whose economies are being integrated into the To increase the audience and to provide information on world economy.” JJ/WBGSP activities, the Secretariat now periodically issues newsletters. Participants can sign up for the Development of the Community Network newsletter online or can send an e-mail to the Secretariat. During FY06, the program has undertaken to establish an The Web-based Discussion Forum was initiated as a plat- alumni network in the home countries of the JJ/WBGSP form to engage participants in discussions ranging from alumni. To start with, the program has been working with the development issues to their personal experience with their programs of study. The Discussion Forum provides an 18 countries that have more than 50 alumni each. An alumni interactive space for participants to initiate debate on current representative has been selected for each of those countries, and emerging development issues, to explore opportunities, and, in collaboration with the program, lost contacts are to share knowledge, and to volunteer to provide assistance being searched. The alumni network opens an opportunity to to colleagues from other regions. organize knowledge-sharing and networking events in those countries in partnership with other development stakeholders. In recognition of the achievements of the JJ/WBGSP alumni and their contributions to the capacity-building of developing countries, the program publishes profiles of To foster active networking in our community, the program’s alumni on the Web site. The profiles are a means to promote Web site was strengthened substantially by e-publishing the the results of the program, to better inform members abstracts of the master’s theses written by the scholars and about each other, and to provide an opportunity for people also by posting the curriculum vitae of each of our alumni. In interested in the program to learn directly from former addition, increased communication and interaction with the scholars. Along the same lines, the JJ/WBGSP has begun alumni allowed updating of our alumni information on the to further support and promote its graduating scholars by database. posting the curriculum vitae and thesis abstract of each on the Web site. Another face-to-face interaction took place during the summer The Online Alumni Information Form was created in 2006 of 2006 when the program organized a brown-bag lunch to help scholars who had completed their awards so they seminar, inviting twenty of the JJ/WBGSP scholars who were could update their contact and employment information interning at various international organizations located in through the Scholarship Web site. It helps both scholars Washington. The occasion gave the scholars and the and the JJ/WBGS Program to interact on different program Secretariat an opportunity to meet and discuss the depth activities and to enhance relationships. and breadth of their studies and their internships, as well as their future plans after completing their degrees under the The Web site has been popular. According to the Web statistics reports of the WBI, there were 1,909,091 page JJ/WBGSP. requests from visitors to the scholarship Web site between July 2005 and June 2006 (477,237 more requests than in the previous year). During this period, the JJ/WBGSP Web site was consistently ranked among the top three or four most visited sites within the WBI. www.worldbank.org/wbi/scholarships/ 18


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    NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN 2006 countries. While they will be in charge of training within their facilities, they will also have to work closely with Limitation of the Number of host Institutions for Japan’s National Tax College, where practical training will the Regular Program also take place. Three universities will be competitively selected on the basis of their technical and financial pro- The current eligibility criteria for the JJ/WBGSP Regular posals. The final selection should be completed in fall 2006. Program offer wide flexibility in the choice of field of study and host institution. In the past five years, scholars have studied at Visits to Partner Universities 250 institutions in more than 500 different academic programs. This range of study has resulted in great dispersion Every year, the JJ/WBGSP Secretariat visits a number of scholars while increasing administrative cost, creating of partner universities to discuss issues related to the difficulty in assessing all programs and institutions, and implementation of partnership programs and meet with causing difficulty in organizing common activities such as scholars. In 2006, visits extended to partner universities in seminars. Japan, US and Cote d’Ivoire. As a result, the JJ/WBGSP Steering Committee has decided Japan to restrict the Regular Program to a limited number of insti- tutions and programs starting with academic year 2007/8. During sp ring 2006, a mission w ent to Jap an to visit The initial selection of around 50 institutions will include the the five Partnership Programs at Yokohama National 10 Partnership Universities, as well as institutions that have University, GRIPS, Keio University, and Tsukub a hosted at least five scholars over the past five years. The list University, and memb ers of the mission attend ed will be updated annually and will be open to new institutions. t he g rad uat io n c erem o nies o f t w o c o ho rt s o f JJ/ WBGSP scholars. The mission confirmed the This new approach will allow better targeting of academic p rogram’s contrib ution to cap acity enhancement programs that are more relevant to the program’s objectives. and human resources d evelop ment. Many issues It will also facilitate the creation of a scholars’ community, w ere d iscussed w ith the p rogram d irectors to help will help reduce administrative costs, and will improve the them imp rove the q uality of the ed ucation they quality of services to the scholars. d eliver, and the status of the comp etitive b id d ing p rocess for the next round of contract renew al w as Tax Programs Partnerships Renewal review ed . Both grad uates and scholars exp ressed their d eep ap p reciation for the know led ge, training, The grant agreements with three programs in Japan offering and p ersonalized care that they received d uring master’s degrees in tax-related subjects are coming to an their stud ies, thanks to JJ/ WBGSP sp onsorship . end. To comply with the World Bank’s procurement policy and to allow newly interested universities to submit their Harvard University proposals, a request for proposals was launched in March 2006 and short-listed universities were invited to bid for A mission visited the Kennedy School of Government the three programs, which are currently held at Keio (KSG) at Harvard University on May 12, 2006. The mission University, Yokohama National University, and GRIPS. met with officials at the KSG to discuss issues related to the Master’s of Public Administration in International Universities were asked to present a proposal to develop and Development (MPA/ID) Program and the Mason Fellows deliver a training program on taxation and policy management Program, and mission members also met with first- and for policy makers and mid-career professionals from relevant second-year MPA/ID scholars. The scholars expressed a departments, such as Ministry of Finance, Central Bank, general satisfaction with the program, specifically, (1) the and Internal Revenue and Tax Offices. The universities will cross-cultural exchanges that occur among them, (2) the have to cater to the socioeconomic settings of developing content of the courses, (3) the opportunities offered by the 19


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    Alumni Voices university and its network which have opened many doors for them, and (4) the responsiveness of the administration to their needs and requests. The scholars expressed interest in having a one-day seminar at the World Bank, being able to participate Ms. Maria Rica C. Bueno, Philippines in various seminars and conferences organized by the World Development Planning Program, Queensland Bank, and having a forum on the Internet so that they can University, 1998 exchange views on similar topics with other scholars. Columbia University I completed my master’s in development planning from the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, in August A delegation from WBI represented the JJ/WBGSP at the 2000. Earning my post-graduate studies overseas was a dream graduation ceremony of the class of 2006 of the Program in come true, and it was made possible under the JJ/WBGSP, to Economic Policy Management (PEPM). Professor Lisa which I am deeply grateful. Anderson, Dean of the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), chaired the ceremony, and Prince Karim Aga Khan was the keynote speaker. The delegation also held a At the time of my scholarship, I was a senior tourism operations separate meeting with Dean Anderson and discussed possible officer in the Office of Product Research and Development at ways of improving and expanding the collaboration between the Philippines Department of Tourism (PDOT). Studying SIPA and the JJ/WBGSP. at the University of Queensland in Brisbane was a life- changing experience. Not only did it broaden my knowledge University of Cocody (Abidjan) academically regarding various planning issues and strategies but also the lessons learned and experiences gathered outside A delegation of the JJ/WBGSP Secretariat met in July 2006 with students of the 8th cohort, Gestion des Politiques of the four walls of the classroom through cultural exchanges Economiques (GPE)-Cocody, and got their feedback about with classmates from other countries and adaptation to the program. Students confirmed the relevance of the training Australia’s culture made me more tolerant and confident in provided by the program. They also stressed the need to facing real life challenges. reinforce the English language course. The mission was particularly impressed by the motivation of students and the Two months after my return to PDOT, I was promoted to high value they attached to the Economic Policy Management (EPM) Program. chief tourism operations officer. The EPM Phase III Planning Meeting Another turning point in my career came in 2005 when I was (Abidjan, July 2006) chosen to head the Asia Pacific Marketing Team created by our Department Secretary. It is an honor for me to be reporting The JJ/WBGSP Secretariat participated to the planning directly to the highest person in the department now, I have not meeting for phase III of the EPM Program and the second worked this close to the Secretary during my entire PDOT meeting of the EPM network (EPMAN). There was a strong consensus during the meeting that the program did achieve career— until this time. its main objectives of building the capacity of partner institutions, on one hand, and training a critical mass of economic policy Life has been a challenging, yet fulfilling, journey. Doors of analysts, on the other. Academic staff members in partner opportunities have been opened. Let me take this occasion to institutions benefited from several training workshops and express my deepest gratitude to the government of Japan and seminars in economic policy and management-related topics. to the World Bank for believing in my potentials and for awarding me the scholarship. My heartfelt thank you to JJ/WBGSP for helping me fulfill my dream of study abroad. May the program continues to tap and develop future movers of development. All the best!!! 20


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    THE ECONOMIC POLICY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM: AN AFRICAN CAPACITY BUILDING INITIATIVE In pursuit of their common objective to strengthen the public sec- tor capacity in sub-Saharan Africa, the World Bank and the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) launched in 1998 the Economic Policy Management program (EPM) in four African uni- versities. The overall goal was to improve the efficiency of the pub- lic sector by enhancing the capacity for economic policy analysis and management. Two Master degrees, one “Anglophone” and one “Francophone”, were established, in 1998, at Makerere University (Uganda) and the University of Ghana-Legon, for the “Anglophone” part, and to the University of Yaounde II and the University of Cocody-Abidjan for the “Francophone” one. The World Bank support, which amounted to $4 million, was provided Partcipants to the EPM Phase III planning meeting, Abidjan, July 2006. mainly through scholarships awarded by the JJ/WBGSP program to almost 25% of EPM students attending these universities. The JJ/WBGSP and the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) have supported the training of more than Since its inception, the EPM program trained more than 950 950 midcareer professionals, mostly from the public sector. mid-career professionals, supported by ACBF and the Feedback from both scholars and employers indicates that JJ/WBGSP, coming from 32 countries. About 47% of the ben- the program’s outcomes are highly appreciated. The EPM eficiaries came from the four hosting countries. Uganda has Program’s graduates are very well trained and respond to a benefited the most from the program with a total of 153 schol- real need for economic policy analysts and advisers in ars over the 1998-2006 period, followed by Ghana (121), African public administrations. Cameroon (90) and Cote d’Ivoire (85). Among the non-hosting countries, Kenya and Tanzania have the highest number of Participants also agreed that additional effort is needed scholars with respectively 66 scholars and 40 scholars trained to consolidate the capacity of participating universities, over the same period. EPM scholars mostly come from the and that the existing EPM Programs are fulfilling only part of public sector. The core program is based on advanced eco- the need for policy analysts. The JJ/WBGSP Secretariat nomics, public management and policy analysis courses. The confirmed the continuation of WBI’s support to the program programs also require the writing of policy research papers and urged partner universities to address the issues discussed, and a three-month internship. Feedback from both scholars particularly the ones related to the various programs’ and employers indicates that the program’s graduates are harmonization, the accreditation of francophone EPM degrees, highly appreciated not only for their analytical skills but also and the search for additional funding sources. In parallel, the for their leadership qualities. A tracer study conducted by mission held a series of coordination meetings with ACBF Makerere University over the six first cohorts of the program officials. showed that more than 76% of EPM-Makerere alumni were able to improve their professional situation during the five years following their graduation by either being promoted by their previous employers or by moving from their previous jobs for better positions. While mainly working for central and local Governments and agencies (54%), Makerere EPM alumni are also present in the private sector (16%), academia (13%), NGOs (13%) and International Organizationss (4%). Positions occupied by EPM alumni include Chief Economist at the Zambia Competition Commission, Senior economists at The Ministry of Finance of Kenya and Senior Economist at the Ministry of Planning, Economy and Empowerment of Tanzania. 21


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    Alumni Voices PROGRAM FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE The JJ/WBGSP is funded entirely by the government of Japan and administered by the World Bank Institute. Table 3 gives the allocations received by the program since its inception in 1987. As listed in Table 3, the program received a total funding of US$161.4 million over the period 1988–2006. The annual Mr. Hernán Briceño, Peru average increase over the whole period was 17.5 percent. Economics, Pontificia Universidad The funding allocated to the program increased steadily until 2000. The variations observed during the past years are Catolica de Chile, 2000 mainly due to the Japanese Yen exchange rate fluctuation. I studied for a master’s degree in Economics, Public Policies, Most of the funds received (89 percent) are used to provide and Macroeconomics topics at the Catholic University of support to scholars. The rest of the funds serve for funding Chile between 2000 and 2002, which was after I finished Scaling-Up Program activities and to cover the management my university studies in one of the National Universities cost of the program (Figure 13). from Lima. Before my study supported by the J J /WBGSP, I was a young professor in the National School of Merchandise Navy where I taught economics and international commerce courses. Now I am an economist adviser to the Ministry of TABLE J APAN’S ALLOCAT ION T O Transportation and Communication in Lima, where my job 3 J J /W B GSP, FY 8 8 -FY 0 6 (IN US$ ) is related to communication regulation and to the designing of communication policies. I also teach courses about theory AMOUNT IN US$ and international economy in various universities— both FISCAL YEARS (THOUSANDS) private and national— such as San Ignacio of Loyola and 12, 232, 000 1998-1992 Federico Villarreal University. I participate actively in the 39, 222, 200 1993-1997 discussion of important topics by publishing articles in 58, 195, 552 important newspapers and specialized magazines. 1998-2002 12, 523, 148 2003 I am very grateful to J J /WBGSP for its support and help. 13, 978, 917 2004 12, 860, 956 2005 12, 436, 400 2006 12, 669, 000 2007 174, 118, 173 Total 22


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    I would like to express my gratitude to the Government of Japan for providing me the financial support to pursue Financial sup p ort p rovid ed to scholars covers tuition the Masters Program in Public Administration at the and related fees, living exp enses, and travel costs. Desp ite the inflationary trend s in higher ed ucation costs in major host countries, such as the United States and the United Kingd om, the p rogram has Thank You Kennedy School of Government. Prior to this, I worked with a private sector bank in India in the micro finance and development research been successful in limiting the increases in the annual group. I intend to return to India after my education average cost p er scholar, mainly through red ucing here to engage in the task of making financial markets ad ministrative costs and negotiating cost- sharing arrangements w ith host universities. The average and institutions to poor households. annual c ost p er sc holar fluc tuated around US$ 32,000 over the p ast 5 years. It should b e noticed , I once again thank you for making it possible for me to however, that the actual cost in the various JJ/ WBGSP pursue this program. programs varies widely, from a low of about $15,000 Bindu Ananth, India to more than $60,000 per scholar per year. Thank You It has been an excellent occasion to update my knowl- edge of economics theory and to acquire solid tools to improve my skills in applying the theory to economics problems. Additionally, the experience in this program FIGURE 13. Main Components of JJ/WBGSP Budget for FY06 has enriched culturally my life through sharing with people of 22 countries in the world. Through your generosity, the Government of J apan, you have made my goal a reality and I now will Scaling-Up graduate in the spring of 2006, and continue working Administration 4% 7% at the Central Bank of Honduras and apply my newly obtained knowledge. Partnerships 42% Erica Maria Narvaez, Honduras Regular Grâce à cette bourse j’ai étudié dans de très bonnes condi- Program 47% Thank You tions, ce qui m’a permis d’obtenir avec succès le diplôme. De retour au pays, j’adresse mes vifs et sincères remer- ciements au gouvernement et à tout le peuple japonais. En vous assurant de ne ménager aucun effort pour mettre les nouvelles connaissances au service du développement du Mali, mon pays et de toute l’Afrique. Thank You Samba Soumare, Mali 23


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    Alumni Voices DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMS Programs in Africa Mr. Salim Reza, Bangladesh The JJ/WBGSP and ACBF have jointly sponsored 30 scholars Program in Public Policy and Taxation, in each program since 1998 to study for their master’s degree in Economic Policy Management (EPM). The core program is Yokohama National University, 2003 based on advanced economics, public management and policy analysis courses. The programs also require the writing of policy I graduated from Yokohama National University (YNU) research papers and a three-month internship. The duration of in March 2005 with a master’s degree in economics in the the anglophone programs at Makerere University in Uganda field of Public Policy and Taxation under the J J /WBGSP. and the University of Ghana at Legon in Ghana is 18 months, The topic of my thesis was “The Impact of Public Spending, including a 3-month internship. The duration of the francophone Investment, and Taxation on Economic G rowth in programs at Cocody University in Côte d'Ivoire and Yaoundé II University in Cameroon is 15 months, including a 3-month Bangladesh— An Empirical Study.” The study environment internship. of Yokohama National University was very sound. Besides the academic program, we had three field trips related to CONTACT. For additional information, Japanese culture and society and the Japanese economy. My acquisition of academic knowledge and professional experiences in YNU has enhanced my analytical ability, my professional experiences, and my academic knowledge, as well as my self-confidence to feel at ease while working in policy analysis. The degree has also enhanced my problem- Makerere University in Uganda solving and decision-making skills, my planning strategies, Professor John Ddumba-Ssentamu and other skills to reach a desired goal. Dean, Faculty of Economics and Management (FEMA) Director of EPM Program P.O. Box 7062 After returning home, I have been posted in National Board Kampala, Uganda of Revenue (NBR), which is the central tax administration Tel: (256-41) 530-115 in Bangladesh. Recently, I have been given a new assignment Fax: (256-41) 532-355 in addition to my previously mentioned assignments. I am E-mail: jddumba@yahoo.com or jddumba@fema.mak.ac.ug working on automating the tax administration in Web site: http://www.makerere.ac.ug Bangladesh by introducing a fully computerized system. The automation and modernization of the tax administration is extremely necessary to increase the tax to GDP ratio, which at only 9.5 percent is too low to achieve sustainable development. 24


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    University of Yaoundé II in Cameroon University of Cocody in Côte d’Ivoire Professor Roger Tsafack Nanfosso Dr. Assaba Paul Seca Directeur, Programme GPE–Yaoundé Director, Programme GPE–Abidjan BP 1792 08 BP 1295 Abidjan 08, Côte d’Ivoire Yaoundé, Cameroon Tel : (225) 22-48-62-12 Tel: (237) 223-84-36 Fax: (225) 22-48-82-84 Fax: (237) 223-84-282 E-mail: apseca@gpe-afrique.org E-mail: tsafacknanfosso@yahoo.fr or Web site: http://www.ucocody.ci rtsafack@epman.org Web site: http://www.cm.refer.org/edu/ram3/univers/uy2/uy2.htm Programs in Japan University of Ghana in Ghana Dr. Yaw Asante Director, EPM–Ghana University of Ghana P.O. Box 57, Legon University of Tsukuba Accra, Ghana Program in Policy Management Tel: (233-21) 51-87-40 Fax: (233-21) 51-87-41 BACKGROUND. This two-year master’s degree program is E-mail: yasante@econs.ug.edu.gh or dryasante@yahoo.com designed to admit cohorts of 10 scholars in odd alternate Web site: http://www.ug.edu.gh years. The Graduate School of International Political Economy manages the program within the university, although scholars may study in many parts of the institution. The university nominates 20 applicants for each cohort, and JJ/WBGSP selects 10 nominees for sponsorship. 25


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    Alumni Voices CONTACT. For additional information, Professor Neantro Saavedra-Rivano Director, Program in Policy Management Graduate School of International Political Economy Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573, Japan Fax: (81-0-298) 53-6797 E-mail: wbgsp@gsipe.kokusai.tsukuba.ac.jp Web site: http://www.dpipe.tsukuba.ac.jp/wbgsp/index.html Mr. Atef Sayed Ramadan Mohamed, Egypt Public Policy, GRIPS, 2003 I received the JJ/WBGSP scholarship for one year (September 2003–September 2004) in the Public Finance Course at the Yokohama National University Program in Infrastructure Management National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies ( GRIPS), Tokyo, Japan. My thesis was “An Empirical Investigation of BACKGROUND. At Yokohama National University (YNU), the the Determinants of Taxation Level in Egypt 1981–2003.” program in infrastructure management aims to help midcareer The topic matches my career very much. I am a researcher in professionals gain expertise in the economic and engineering the General Directorate of Tax Treaties, Egyptian Tax aspects of managing all forms of infrastructure. Within the Authority, Ministry of Finance. university, the School of International and Business Law administers the program, although scholars may study in many parts of the institution. The JJ/WBGSP scholars in this program My study through the J J /WBGSP fits in with developing gain valuable practical experience with the assistance of the my career tasks, which are mainly working on tax treaties Japan International Cooperation Agency. New cohorts in this between Egypt and other countries, and investigating and two-year program start in April of odd alternate years. The solving the problems that arise between foreign taxpayers in number of scholars increased from 9 in the first cohort to 15 Egypt and the Egyptian Tax Authority. in the following cohorts. CONTACT. For additional information, I am grateful to the J J /WBGSP. Although I do the same Professor Tatsuhiko Ikeda job as I did before obtaining my master’s degree, the degree Director, Program in Infrastructure Management that I obtained has a great positive effect in developing and Graduate School of International and Business Law updating my knowledge, as well as improving my job abilities. 79-4 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku Now I am one of the Egyptian delegates who deal with Yokohama 240-8501, Japan negotiating tax treaties between Egypt and other countries. Fax: (81-45) 339-3610 The tax treaty course that is given in the National Tax E-mail: Infra.office@iblaw.ynu.ac.jp Web site: http://www.igss.ynu.ac.jp/index-e.htm College in Japan during the master’s course was the first step toward my learning the technical points in tax treaty matters. 26


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    Yokohama National University 15-45, Mita 2-chome Program in Public Policy and Taxation Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8345, Japan Fax: (81-3) 5427-1638 The Graduate School of Economics of YNU manages the E-mail: jjwbgsp@Fbc.keio.ac.jp program in Public Policy and Taxation, drawing on course Web site: work from many other parts of the institution. This program http://www.fbc.keio.ac.jp/directory/directory.html is entirely separate from the infrastructure management program also located on the YNU campus. However, some faculty members teach in both programs. Every April, a new cohort of five scholars will start their studies. CONTACT. For additional information, Professor Arie Daisuke, Director Director, Master's Program in Public Policy & Taxation National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS) 79-3 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku Master’s Degree Program in Public Finance Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8501, Japan Fax: (81-45) 339-3504 BACKGROUND. The major aim of the program, which E-mail: is-mpe@ynu.ac.jp started at Saitama University in 1997, is to train future fiscal Web site: http://www.igss.ynu.ac.jp/index-e.htm leaders in taxation. Particular emphasis is placed on the education and training of government officials from developing countries worldwide who work in tax administration or equivalent departments. Administrative aspects of taxation are taught in the context of developing countries’ economic and social development. An internship at the National Tax Administration contributes to students’ experience of real problems faced during daily operation of tax administration. Keio University The one-year master’s degree program in Public Finance is Program in Tax Policy and Management taught in English and admits new scholars every year. BACKGROUND. Keio University is well known internationally CONTACT. For additional information, as one of Japan’s leading private universities. It holds the Professor Reiko Nakamura distinction of being the first Japanese university to admit Director Public Finance Program foreign students, a tradition that began in the 19th century. 7-22-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku Scholars have opportunities to study in many parts of the Tokyo 106-8677, Japan university under the overall management of the Graduate Fax: 81-3-6439-6010 School of Business and Commerce. The first cohort began Web site: studies in April 1996. New cohorts of five scholars will http://www.grips.ac.jp/index-e.html begin their studies in April each year. CONTACT. For additional information, Professor Mitsuhiro Fukao Director, Program in Taxation Policy and Management Graduate School of Business & Commerce International Center 27


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    Programs in the United States Alumni Voices Columbia University Program in Economic Policy Management CONTENT. Eleven courses, not previously offered, form the nucleus of the one-year academic segment of this program, followed by a three-month internship in a multilateral aid organization. The internship is a requirement for graduation. Upon successful completion of the program, scholars receive a master’s degree in Public Administration from Columbia Bernice Serwah Duodu University. Economic Policy Management, University of Ghana, 2005 The one-year academic program starts with a required introductory summer preparatory session that emphasizes language and mathe- I served as an Assistant Statistician at Ghana matical skills, computing, accounting, and statistics. Statistical Service since 2000. Due to my interest in policy issues, I pursued a master’s programme in CONTACT. For additional information, Professor Arvid Lukauskas Economic Policy Management at the University of Acting Director, Program in Economic Policy Management Ghana, Legon and graduated in 2005. The 1034 International Affairs Building J J /WBGSP has really been of help in my career. 420 West 118th Street It has clearly deepened my knowledge and under- New York, NY 10027 USA standing to developmental issues. More so, it has Fax: (212) 854-5935 really helped me to apply the knowledge and skills Web site: http://www.columbia.edu/ acquired to the concepts, methodology and techniques of compiling Gross Domestic Product, Quarterly National Accounts and other economic indicators. And this has gone a long way to enhance my capa- bility and productivity in my organization. I am currently a Statistician at the National Harvard University Program in Public Administration in International Development Accounts Section of Economic Statistics Division of Ghana Statistical Service. I compile, process, and CONTENT. The Partnership Program with Harvard University started in analyze data on some sub – sectors of the economy fall 1999. The program of study leads to a master’s degree of Public and compute their Value Added as well as generates Administration in International Development (MPA/ID). The MPA/ID other macroeconomic indicators for policy analysis Program is a rigorous, economics-centered program designed to prepare and national income statistics. My schedule also development practitioners. The duration of the program is 21 months, including a 3-month internship. includes modeling and forecasting, macro economic analysis using available data based on the economy CONTACT. For additional information, of Ghana, as well as updating of Ghana’s Social Ms. Carol Finney Accounting Matrix table for the country. Director, MPA/ID Program 75 John F. Kennedy Street Cambridge, MA 02138 USA Fax: (617) 495-9671 Web site: http://www.ksg.harvard.edu/programs/mpaid/ 28


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    A N N E X TABLE A1 JJ/W BGSP Regular Program Applicants: Distribution by Region and Gender 1987-2006 TABLE A2 JJ/W BGSP Regular Program Applicants: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 TABLE A3 JJ/W BGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Gender 1987-2006 TABLE A4 JJ/W BGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 29


  • Page 32

    TABLE A1 JJ/W BGSP Regular Program Applicants: Distribution by Region and Gender 1987-2006 Region Africa E. Asia ECA LCR MNA S. Asia Unknown Part 1 Total Total 1987-2000 Total 18,881 2,871 1,055 2,797 1,279 3,945 18 625 31,471 # Male 15,781 1,818 617 1,841 1,015 3,319 17 366 24,774 # Female 3,100 1,053 438 956 264 626 1 259 6,697 2001 Total 2,822 288 145 419 258 457 0 34 4,423 # Male 2,283 150 69 232 188 358 0 16 3,296 # Female 539 138 76 187 70 99 0 18 1,127 2002 Total 1,542 260 105 313 88 365 0 50 2,723 # Male 1,252 129 52 165 66 278 0 20 1,962 # Female 290 131 53 148 22 87 0 30 761 2003 Total 1,830 263 93 329 93 362 0 50 3,020 # Male 1,449 137 34 166 78 275 0 24 2,163 # Female 381 126 59 163 15 87 0 26 857 2004 Total 2,178 234 100 407 149 331 0 62 3,461 # Male 1,793 128 52 205 126 250 0 24 2,578 # Female 385 106 48 202 23 81 0 38 883 2005 Total 2,169 241 92 321 129 352 0 82 3,386 # Male 1,764 125 37 171 92 263 0 34 2,486 # Female 402 116 57 151 37 89 0 48 900 2006 Total 2,226 209 71 332 115 358 0 68 3,379 # Male 1,779 92 31 170 81 287 0 27 2,467 # Female 447 117 40 162 34 71 0 41 912 Grand Total Total 31,648 4,366 1,661 4,918 2,111 6,170 18 971 51,863 # Male 26,101 2,579 892 2,950 1,646 5,030 17 511 39,726 # Female 5,544 1,787 771 1,969 465 1,140 1 460 12,137 30


  • Page 33

    TABLE A2 JJ/W BGSP Regular Program Applicants: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 AFRICA 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Totals Angola 79 10 4 2 6 0 4 105 Benin 378 69 22 37 42 32 46 626 Botswana 59 7 3 9 9 6 5 98 Burkina Faso 329 45 38 41 44 42 43 582 Burundi 85 19 5 5 6 6 9 135 Cameroon 617 129 42 86 126 103 87 1,190 Cape Verde 20 3 1 3 1 1 3 32 Central African Republic 58 9 7 12 11 27 12 136 Chad 206 64 21 31 31 38 30 421 Comoros 17 4 1 3 4 7 10 46 Congo, Democratic Republic of 621 100 48 53 88 67 50 1,027 Congo, Republic of 252 61 21 18 35 30 19 436 Cote d'Ivoire 401 55 18 32 42 24 20 592 Djibouti 20 2 1 1 3 0 0 27 Equatorial Guinea 7 2 6 0 0 0 0 15 Eritrea 20 12 30 16 14 16 27 135 Ethiopia 1,009 180 143 213 205 268 276 2,294 Gabon 28 8 2 2 2 1 5 48 Gambia, The 126 12 14 21 21 23 21 238 Ghana 1,563 214 166 183 199 144 134 2,603 Guinea 212 67 23 31 30 31 38 432 Guinea Bissau 23 0 1 3 2 1 1 31 Kenya 1,649 231 113 111 95 108 104 2,411 Lesotho 73 12 8 10 12 6 16 137 Liberia 126 11 3 2 3 4 6 155 Madagascar 280 28 12 52 28 14 44 458 Malawi 354 66 40 29 35 35 46 605 Mali 214 21 7 10 20 17 19 308 Mauritania 67 8 6 9 15 11 11 127 Mauritius 17 1 6 3 2 0 0 29 Mozambique 51 17 4 3 2 5 5 87 Namibia 42 6 2 2 1 4 6 63 Niger 146 52 47 33 24 28 33 363 Nigeria 3,469 605 298 348 506 525 543 6,294 Rwanda 154 26 8 23 25 29 31 296 Sao Tome & Principe 8 2 2 0 1 4 2 19 Senegal 319 70 24 27 36 46 47 569 Seychelles 4 0 0 0 2 0 2 8 Sierra Leone 373 39 18 10 36 34 45 555 Somalia 108 0 0 1 1 0 0 110 South Africa 104 11 9 8 11 5 5 153 Sudan 566 35 19 16 19 21 22 698 Swaziland 65 3 4 4 6 7 3 92 Tanzania 1,785 177 102 101 127 145 138 2,575 Togo 188 42 32 33 41 34 23 393 Uganda 1,503 128 73 91 107 121 101 2,124 Zambia 622 110 69 87 91 81 106 1,166 Zimbabwe 464 49 19 15 11 18 28 604 Grand Total 18,881 2,822 1,542 1,830 2,178 2,169 2,226 31,648 31


  • Page 34

    TABLE A2 JJ/WBGSP Regular Program Applicants: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 E. ASIA 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Cambodia 87 12 14 11 10 20 5 159 China 1,094 46 56 81 47 36 18 1,378 East Timor 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 7 Fiji 15 0 6 1 1 1 2 26 Indonesia 478 64 54 29 27 21 35 708 Kiribati 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 Korea 78 7 0 0 0 0 0 85 Lao PDR 26 8 1 5 7 5 2 54 Malaysia 61 3 2 7 12 5 8 98 Mongolia 51 15 10 11 13 13 7 120 Myanmar 110 58 46 40 62 68 66 450 Papua New Guinea 14 1 3 10 6 10 6 50 Philippines 514 37 34 35 20 30 32 702 Solomon Islands 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 Thailand 162 12 9 8 4 2 5 202 Tonga 9 0 0 1 0 0 0 10 Vanuatu 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 3 Vietnam 157 23 24 22 18 28 22 294 Western Somoa 10 0 0 1 1 1 0 13 Grand Total 2,871 288 260 263 234 241 209 4,366 JJ/WBGSP Europe and Central Asia Applicants: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 ECA 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Albania 78 5 8 5 3 6 1 106 Armenia 22 5 3 2 4 6 6 48 Azerbaijan 19 2 2 2 4 5 2 36 Belarus 36 3 5 2 3 0 4 53 Bosnia 11 2 0 0 0 0 2 15 Bulgaria 94 10 12 6 4 9 3 138 Croatia 8 0 1 4 2 2 2 19 Czech Republic 18 0 0 1 0 0 0 19 Estonia 11 2 3 1 2 0 0 19 Georgia 31 17 12 8 9 4 8 89 Hungary 64 3 2 1 0 0 0 70 Kazakhstan 24 7 3 4 1 1 3 43 Kyrgyz Rep. 30 13 7 5 9 7 4 75 Latvia 9 1 0 4 1 0 0 15 Lithuania 10 6 3 2 1 1 0 23 Macedonia 5 2 0 2 0 1 1 11 Moldova 16 3 5 2 5 2 2 35 Poland 51 0 2 2 0 0 0 55 Portugal 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 Romania 95 16 6 6 9 9 7 148 Russia Federation 90 13 6 8 3 3 3 126 Serbia and Montenegro 54 3 1 2 2 4 3 69 Slovak Republic 19 3 1 1 0 1 0 25 Slovenia 6 1 3 0 1 0 0 11 Tajikistan 5 2 2 4 8 5 2 28 Turkey 168 7 10 10 20 9 9 233 Turkmenistan 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 5 Ukraine 43 10 3 3 2 3 2 66 Uzbekistan 25 9 5 5 6 14 6 70 TOTAL 1,055 145 105 93 100 92 71 1,661 32


  • Page 35

    TABLE A2 JJ/W BGSP Regular Program Applicants: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 LCR 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Antigua 4 1 1 0 0 2 1 9 Argentina 218 22 30 27 26 15 15 353 Bahamas 11 0 1 0 0 0 0 12 Barbados 26 2 0 1 2 1 1 33 Belize 9 0 0 1 0 0 0 10 Bolivia 108 20 15 18 23 12 16 212 Brazil 181 31 17 20 21 24 27 321 Chile 145 14 19 12 21 23 25 259 Colombia 330 46 30 29 73 44 59 611 Costa Rica 54 8 7 2 5 10 7 93 Cuba 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 Dominica 18 2 2 1 0 0 23 Dominican Republic 27 3 0 1 3 3 3 40 Ecuador 145 26 11 10 9 12 11 224 El Salvador 40 4 1 1 3 2 2 53 Grenada 11 0 0 1 1 2 1 16 Guatemala 31 2 4 1 0 2 5 45 Guyana 49 8 6 5 2 1 4 75 Haiti 91 52 25 25 21 20 17 251 Honduras 27 7 2 4 9 9 4 62 Jamaica 72 7 12 7 5 2 8 113 Mexico 511 48 45 55 73 61 53 846 Nicaragua 27 7 7 8 4 8 10 71 Panama 16 2 4 0 1 0 0 23 Paraguay 26 1 2 1 2 3 5 40 Peru 341 74 51 62 61 42 31 662 St. Kitts 3 0 1 1 3 1 0 9 St. Lucia 29 6 1 1 0 2 0 39 St. Vincent 12 0 0 1 0 1 2 16 Suriname 9 0 0 0 0 1 2 12 Trinidad & Tobago 46 7 1 2 0 1 0 57 Uruguay 99 14 13 22 19 6 9 182 Venezuela 79 6 4 9 19 11 14 142 West Indies 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Grand Total 2,797 419 313 329 407 321 332 4,918 33


  • Page 36

    TABLE A2 JJ/W BGSP Regular Program Applicants: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 MNA 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Afghanistan 13 2 0 1 5 10 14 45 Algeria 164 46 14 17 29 13 18 301 Bahrain 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Egypt 483 68 17 34 25 22 18 667 Iran 74 16 3 3 21 19 10 146 Iraq 19 4 1 1 0 0 12 37 Jordan 118 14 16 3 11 12 7 181 Kuwait 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 Lebanon 27 1 0 1 0 4 0 33 Libya 6 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 Malta 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Morocco 147 48 10 10 5 10 6 236 Oman 6 1 5 1 2 11 5 31 Saudi Arabia 11 0 0 1 0 0 0 12 Syria 26 9 1 1 1 3 2 43 Tunisia 78 26 6 2 2 3 6 123 West Bank and Gaza 31 10 10 11 27 10 7 106 Yemen Republic 64 12 5 5 21 12 10 129 Grand Total 1,279 258 88 93 149 129 115 2,111 JJ/W BGSP Regular Program Applicants: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 SOUTH ASIA 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Bangladesh 779 53 57 51 54 49 52 1,095 Bhutan 29 8 5 9 5 13 15 84 India 1,126 83 114 119 108 98 102 1,750 Maldives 40 3 3 0 0 0 0 46 Nepal 797 103 67 61 71 88 75 1,262 Pakistan 939 172 100 100 67 76 79 1,533 Sri Lanka 235 35 19 22 26 28 35 400 TOTAL 3,945 457 365 362 331 352 358 6,170 34


  • Page 37

    TABLE A2 JJ/W BGSP Regular Program Applicants: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 PART I 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Australia 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 Austria 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Bahrain 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Belgium 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Canada 35 0 0 0 0 0 0 35 Cyprus 21 0 0 0 1 0 0 22 Finland 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 France 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 36 Germany 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 Greece 32 0 0 0 0 0 0 32 Iceland 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Ireland 9 0 0 1 0 0 0 10 Israel 18 0 0 1 0 1 0 20 Italy 21 0 0 0 0 0 1 22 Japan 208 31 50 45 56 80 65 535 Korea, Rep. 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 3 Kuwait 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 3 Qatar 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Netherlands 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 New Zealand 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Norway 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Saudi Arabia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Singapore 17 3 0 2 1 0 0 23 Spain 20 0 0 1 0 0 0 21 Sweden 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Switzerland 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Taiwan 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 United Kingdom 44 0 0 0 0 0 0 44 United States 97 0 0 0 0 0 0 97 Grand Total 625 34 50 50 62 82 68 971 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Total of Developing Member Countries 30,828 4,389 2,673 2,970 3,399 3,304 3,311 50,874 Total of Industrialized Countries 625 34 50 50 62 82 68 971 Unknown 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 Total Member Countries 31,471 4,423 2,723 3,020 3,461 3,386 3,379 51,863 35


  • Page 38

    TABLE A3 JJ/W BGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Gender 1987-2006 Region Africa E. Asia ECA LCR MNA S. Asia Part 1 Total 1987-2000 Total 677 422 187 270 110 297 127 2,090 # of Men 479 239 104 163 81 227 94 1,387 # of Women 198 183 83 107 29 70 33 703 2001 Total 75 39 20 26 8 24 8 200 # of Men 41 20 10 13 6 18 4 112 # of Women 34 19 10 13 2 6 4 88 2002 Total 71 33 14 25 12 17 10 182 # of Men 42 19 9 17 9 11 5 112 # of Women 29 14 5 8 3 6 5 70 2003 Total 141 59 40 41 13 48 17 359 # of Men 95 34 17 27 10 37 6 226 # of Women 46 25 23 14 3 11 11 133 2004 Total 153 54 37 58 26 30 15 373 # of Men 101 24 19 30 21 20 6 221 # of Women 52 30 18 28 5 10 9 152 2005 Total 70 30 16 32 9 17 15 189 # of Men 52 11 12 17 4 12 7 115 # of Women 18 19 4 15 5 5 8 74 2006 Total 73 24 11 18 7 13 15 161 # of Men 45 7 5 10 6 10 5 88 # of Women 28 17 6 8 1 3 10 73 TOTAL 1,260 645 325 470 185 446 207 3,554 # of Men 855 340 176 277 137 335 127 2,261 # of Women 405 305 149 193 48 111 80 1,293 36


  • Page 39

    TABLE A4 JJ/W BGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 AFRICA 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Angola 5 1 0 0 1 0 0 7 Benin 22 0 1 4 4 2 1 34 Botswana 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 6 Burkina Faso 26 2 2 7 8 2 2 49 Burundi 9 1 2 3 3 2 2 22 Cameroon 27 3 4 5 5 2 4 50 Cape Verde 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 4 Central African Republic 4 2 2 3 3 2 2 18 Chad 12 1 3 2 4 2 2 26 Comoros 2 0 2 0 2 1 2 9 Congo, Democratic Republic of 7 2 3 2 3 1 1 19 Congo, Republic of 11 1 2 3 5 2 1 25 Côte d'Ivoire 17 3 2 3 3 3 3 34 Djibouti 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Eritrea 3 1 0 2 3 0 1 10 Ethiopia 40 4 3 7 8 5 5 72 Gabon 4 1 0 1 1 1 1 9 Gambia 6 1 0 3 3 1 2 16 Ghana 58 4 6 5 8 3 3 87 Guinea 17 2 0 4 3 1 3 30 Guinea-Bissau 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Kenya 47 6 5 12 7 6 3 86 Lesotho 3 0 1 1 3 0 1 9 Liberia 7 1 0 0 2 1 1 12 Madagascar 20 3 1 5 4 1 1 35 Malawi 16 1 1 1 3 2 2 26 Mali 9 0 1 3 4 2 2 21 Mauritania 4 1 1 2 3 2 2 15 Mauritius 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 Mozambique 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 Namibia 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 5 Niger 9 2 1 4 3 2 1 22 Nigeria 63 5 3 7 8 2 3 91 Rwanda 12 1 1 6 4 3 3 30 Sao Tome & Principe 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Senegal 16 3 2 5 6 1 2 35 Seychelles 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 Sierra Leone 14 3 3 6 5 4 2 37 Somalia 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 South Africa 6 2 0 3 0 1 1 13 Sudan 22 3 3 5 5 1 2 41 Swaziland 4 0 1 0 3 0 0 8 Tanzania 36 3 3 8 5 3 3 61 Togo 11 1 3 4 7 1 1 28 Uganda 46 5 4 7 4 3 3 72 Zambia 26 3 3 5 4 2 2 45 Zimbabwe 15 1 1 1 2 2 0 22 TOTAL 677 75 71 141 153 70 73 1,260 37


  • Page 40

    TABLE A4 JJ/W BGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 EAST ASIA & PACIFIC 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Cambodia 14 3 4 5 2 1 1 30 China 133 7 5 8 8 5 5 171 Fiji 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 4 Indonesia 40 4 4 8 4 6 4 70 Kiribati 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 Korea 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 Lao PDR 11 1 1 2 4 0 1 20 Malaysia 6 0 1 2 3 0 2 14 Mongolia 26 3 3 5 3 4 3 47 Myanmar 31 5 4 12 9 4 3 68 Papua New Guinea 4 0 1 1 3 1 1 11 Philippines 54 5 2 5 6 3 2 77 Thailand 24 5 1 2 1 0 1 34 Tonga 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 Vietnam 57 6 6 8 9 5 1 92 Western Somoa 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 TOTAL 422 39 33 59 54 30 24 661 JJ/W BGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 EUROPE & CENTRAL ASIA 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Albania 10 0 2 1 3 1 0 17 Armenia 9 1 0 4 1 0 2 17 Azerbaijan 5 1 0 1 2 1 0 10 Belarus 6 0 2 0 0 0 0 8 Bosnia 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Bulgaria 20 4 1 3 1 0 29 Croatia 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 Czech Republic 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 Estonia 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 Georgia 12 1 1 4 3 3 2 26 Hungary 11 0 0 1 0 0 0 12 Kazakhstan 6 2 1 2 2 0 0 13 Kosovo 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Kyrgyz Republic 4 2 1 2 2 1 1 13 Latvia 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 Lithuania 3 2 0 1 1 0 0 7 Macedonia 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Moldova 4 0 2 0 3 0 0 9 Poland 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 Romania 17 1 1 5 3 1 1 29 Russia Federation 18 0 0 3 0 1 0 22 Serbia and Montenegro 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 5 Slovak Republic 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Slovenia 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Tajikistan 3 0 1 0 2 2 0 8 Turkey 12 1 1 4 6 2 1 27 Turkmenistan 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 3 Ukraine 9 2 0 0 0 1 1 13 Uzbekistan 11 1 1 4 4 2 2 25 38 TOTAL 187 20 14 40 37 16 11 325


  • Page 41

    TABLE A4 JJ/W BGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 LCR 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Antigua and Barbuda 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Argentina 22 2 3 2 3 2 0 34 Bahamas 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Barbados 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Belize 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Bolivia 9 1 1 2 6 2 1 22 Brazil 19 2 3 2 8 3 1 38 Chile 18 2 0 4 5 4 1 34 Colombia 29 4 1 4 4 2 3 47 Costa Rica 4 1 2 0 1 1 0 9 Dominica 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 Dominican Republic 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 Ecuador 15 1 1 1 1 1 1 21 El Salvador 3 2 1 1 0 1 0 8 Grenada 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 4 Guatemala 6 0 1 1 0 0 0 8 Guyana 15 1 1 1 2 0 1 21 Haiti 15 0 3 2 1 0 0 21 Honduras 1 1 0 1 2 2 1 8 Jamaica 5 0 1 0 1 0 1 8 Mexico 33 4 1 5 7 3 1 54 Nicaragua 2 0 1 2 0 0 1 6 Panama 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Paraguay 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Peru 40 3 2 6 6 5 4 66 St. Kitts 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 5 St. Lucia 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 5 St. Vincent 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 Suriname 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Trinidad & Tobago 5 0 1 1 0 1 0 8 Uruguay 9 1 1 2 3 0 0 16 Venezuela 6 0 0 1 4 1 0 12 TOTAL 270 26 25 41 58 32 18 470 JJ/W BGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2006 MNA 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Algeria 14 1 2 1 3 1 1 23 Egypt 35 3 1 3 6 2 1 51 Iran 14 1 1 2 6 1 1 26 Iraq 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Jordan 13 1 2 1 3 1 0 21 Lebanon 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 4 Morocco 15 2 1 1 1 1 1 22 Oman 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Syria 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Tunisia 6 0 1 1 1 1 1 11 West Bank & Gaza 6 0 2 2 3 0 1 14 Yemen Republic 2 0 1 2 3 0 1 9 TOTAL 110 8 12 13 26 9 7 185 39


  • Page 42

    TABLE A4 JJ/W BGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2005 SOUTH ASIA 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Afghanistan 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 5 Bangladesh 38 3 2 9 4 2 2 60 Bhutan 9 3 3 5 3 3 3 29 India 116 8 4 11 7 3 2 151 Maldives 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Nepal 48 3 3 5 5 3 2 69 Pakistan 60 5 3 11 4 4 1 88 Sri Lanka 20 2 2 6 6 1 2 39 TOTAL 297 24 17 48 30 17 13 446 JJ/W BGSP Scholarship Awards: Distribution by Region and Country 1987-2005 PART I 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Australia 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Belgium 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Canada 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Cyprus 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Ireland 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Italy 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Japan 112 8 10 17 15 15 15 192 Sweden 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 United Kingdom 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 United States 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 TOTAL 127 8 10 17 15 15 15 207 TOTAL AWARDEES 1987-2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Total Total of Developing Member Countries 1,963 192 172 342 358 174 146 3,347 Total of Industrialized Countries 127 8 10 17 15 15 15 207 Total Member Countries 2,090 200 182 359 373 189 161 3,554 40


  • Page 43

    PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION The administration of the JJ/WBGSP is undertaken through the Steering Committee and the Secretariat. The Steering Committee provides overall policy and direction for the program and annually selects candidates to receive scholarships. The Secretariat is responsible for the day-to-day function of the JJ/WBGSP. The current members of those entities are listed below. Steering Committee Secretariat Chairman Supervising Manager Frannie A. Léautier Kabir Ahmed Vice President, World Bank Institute Administrator Deputy Chairman Kamel Braham Makoto Hosomi Executive Director for Japan, World Bank Program Officer Marie des Neiges Grossas Members Senior Program Assistant Philippe Le Houerou María-Isabel Ruiz-Galindo Vice President, Concessional Finance and Global Partner, World Bank Program Assistant Song Li Ting Fong Joong-Kyung Choi Executive Director for Australia, Korea, and New Zealand, Staff Assistants World Bank Anna Marie Croom Fatima Latif Mathias Sinamenye María Carolina Morillo Executive Director, for Botswana, Burundi, and Ethiopia, World Bank Consultant Larissa Triglebova Ruth Kagia Sector Director, Human Development Network Education Team, World Bank Scaling-Up Program Wafik Grais Senior Adviser Senior Adviser, Tsutomu Shibata Financial Sector, World Bank Consultant Yumi Ejiri Marito H. Garcia Sector Manager, Education, Latin America and the Staff Assistant Caribbean Region, Fatima Latif World Bank


  • Page 44

    JOINT JAPAN/ WORLD BANK GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM (JJ/ WBGSP) Phone: 202-473-6849 Fax: 202-522-4036 www.worldbank.org/ wbi/ scholarships/ Email: jjwbgsp@worldbank.org THE WORLD BANK 1818 H. Street, NW Washington, DC 20433 USA www.worldbank.org/ Information Line: 202-458-2498 Email: wbi_infoline@worldbank.org


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