avatar Juniper Networks, Inc. Manufacturing
  • Location: California 
  • Founded:
  • Website:

Pages

  • Page 1

    JUNIPER NETWORKS, INC. 1194 N. Mathilda Avenue Sunnyvale, California 94089 www.juniper.net (408) 745-2000 2007 Annual Report Letter to Stockholders Notice of 2008 Annual Meeting of Stockholders and Proxy Statement Report on Form 10-K


  • Page 2


  • Page 3

    To Our Stockholders: 2007 was a very successful year for Juniper Networks on many fronts, both financially and strategically. First, the financial success: the Company posted $2.84 billion in revenue, ahead of our expectations and 23% above 2006. Our revenue growth rates compared to the prior year accelerated in each successive quarter during the year, and our fourth quarter marked the highest single revenue quarter in Juniper history. We delivered on the bottom line as well, posting $360.8 million, or $0.62 per diluted share, in GAAP net earnings, as we demonstrated improved leverage in our business model exiting 2007. We ended the year with over $2 billion in cash and cash equivalents. These results demonstrated that Juniper executed on its two key strategic goals for 2007: - build revenue momentum in the high-performance segment of the networking market; and, - begin to expand operating margins as we focus on establishing operating excellence and progress toward our targeted profitability model. In 2008 we are poised to make further gains on both of those objectives. We are in this position because Juniper is pursuing a strategy that is aligned closely with the evolution in global network infrastructure. Our business is no longer so much about the individual pieces – core, edge, aggregation, access – nor is it about building specific products to the needs of customer verticals – service providers, enterprises and public sector agencies. We serve all these customers with customized solutions, but each solution is built with an underlying focus on total network performance, supported by an infrastructure footprint that provides fast, reliable and secure access to applications and services at global scale. Underlying those capabilities is JUNOS, our single-source network operating system that runs across our network infrastructure. We call our approach high-performance networking – and it is the DNA of our company. In fact, it is also our core strength in the marketplace, and the market itself has helped validate that assertion. We serve each of the top 65 network service providers around the world. We serve 96 of the Fortune 100 enterprises. We serve the U.S. government and many NATO governments, as well as others around the globe. Many of these customers are taking advantage of our broad portfolio of high-performance networking infrastructure offerings, including the MX-series family of Ethernet service and multi- service edge routers. The MX-series established itself upon its introduction in 2007 as one of our fastest ramping new product families ever and is at the forefront of efficient and cost-effective


  • Page 4

    Ethernet networks and services, providing the performance and scalability to such applications as Internet Protocol TV (IPTV) and video-on-demand. Products like the MX960, the largest capacity and highest density Ethernet platform for carriers available today, and the recently introduced MX480 and MX240 play right into our high-performance focus. We also continue to win customer acceptance and industry accolades for products like our T1600 multi-terabit core router, the industry’s highest throughput and most energy efficient core router, and recipient of Internet Telephony’s 2007 product of the year designation. Revenue from our T- series products grew 55% in the fourth quarter compared to Q4 of the prior year and the product group is now deployed in more than 200 production networks globally. In addition to the momentum we’ve established with these new key product lines, at the conclusion of 2007 we achieved quarterly profitability on a non-GAAP basis in our Service Layer Technology (SLT) segment. We crossed the half-billion dollar revenue mark in this business in 2007 as our products continued to gain market share. We believe our firewall, SSL VPN and WAN Optimization solutions will continue to be well-received by our customers. So, our technology, our market position and our recognition as a leader by customers and industry followers are all as strong as they ever have been for Juniper. However, we also need to turn the opportunities these positions create into increasing value for stockholders. Juniper performed well in 2007, but it can perform better. And our team is hard at work on making that happen. During 2007 we began implementing a series of company-wide operating initiatives---we call them our 4 Ps, for planning, productivity, processes and people. Collectively our efforts are focused on supporting the scalability of our business in a number of ways: optimally aligning our resources – human and financial -- with our R&D and marketing activities; finding and executing on productivity improvement opportunities in our sales and service organizations; leveraging the capabilities of our engineering organization across all product groups; and transforming core systems and processes to create efficiencies in areas like product design, customer support and enterprise resource planning. These initiatives underpin a business focus on strengthening our operating profit margins. The later part of 2007 yielded initial results that give us a good start on that path, but much remains to be done. We will continue to focus relentlessly on execution and operational excellence as we progress toward our performance goals.


  • Page 5

    Along the way, we will continue to build on our position as the leader in high performance networking. Juniper is only a 12-year old company, yet it has and continues to play a critical role in defining how to deliver optimal network performance in a global information environment demanding ever-increasing bandwidth and speed. The good news is that seeing and meeting these challenges happens to be our organization’s underlying strength. By focusing on the open architecture that we believe will drive optimal network performance, and tailoring our solutions to customers whether they are operators or users of those networks, we expect to continue leading the way. Our confidence in these goals is made stronger by the more than 6,000 talented people throughout Juniper’s global organizations who embody our high-performance DNA approach. I want to thank them for their great work, as well as our partners, customers, suppliers, and stockholders for their support of Juniper Networks. Sincerely, Scott Kriens Chairman and Chief Executive Officer


  • Page 6

    (This page intentionally left blank.)


  • Page 7

    JUNIPER NETWORKS, INC. 1194 North Mathilda Avenue Sunnyvale, California 94089 www.juniper.net (408) 745-2000 NOTICE OF 2008 ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS Time and Date 9:00 a.m., Pacific time, on Wednesday, May 21, 2008 Juniper Networks, Inc. Place 1220 North Mathilda Avenue Building 3, Pacific Conference Room Sunnyvale, CA 94089 Items of Business (1) To elect two Class III directors; (2) To approve the Juniper Networks, Inc. 2008 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (3) To ratify the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as auditors for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2008; and (4) To consider such other business as may properly come before the meeting. Adjournments and Postponements Any action on the items of business described above may be consid- ered at the annual meeting at the time and on the date specified above or at any time and date to which the annual meeting may be properly adjourned or postponed. Record Date You are entitled to vote only if you were a Juniper Networks stock- holder as of the close of business on March 24, 2008. This notice of annual meeting and proxy statement and form of proxy are being distributed on or about April 18, 2008.


  • Page 8

    Meeting Admission You are entitled to attend the annual meeting only if you were a Juniper Networks stockholder as of the close of business on March 24, 2008 or hold a valid proxy for the annual meeting. You should be prepared to present valid government-issued photo identification for admittance. In addition, if you are a stockholder of record, your ownership will be verified against the list of stockholders of record on the record date prior to being admitted to the meeting. If you are not a stockholder of record but hold shares through a broker or nominee (i.e., in street name), you should provide proof of beneficial ownership as of the record date, such as your most recent account statement prior to March 24, 2008, a copy of the voting instruction card provided by your broker, trustee or nominee, or other similar evidence of owner- ship. If you do not provide photo identification or comply with the other procedures outlined above upon request, you may not be admit- ted to the annual meeting. The annual meeting will begin promptly at 9:00 a.m., Pacific time. Check-in will begin at 8:30 a.m., Pacific time, and you should allow ample time for the check-in procedures. Voting Your vote is very important. Whether or not you plan to attend the annual meeting, we encourage you to read this proxy statement and submit your proxy or voting instructions as soon as possible. You may submit your proxy or voting instructions for the annual meeting by completing, signing, dating and returning your proxy or voting instruction card in the pre-addressed envelope provided, or, in most cases, by using the telephone or the Internet. For specific instructions on how to vote your shares, please refer to the section entitled Questions and Answers beginning on page 1 of this proxy statement and the instructions on the proxy or voting instruction card. By Order of the Board of Directors, Mitchell L. Gaynor Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary Important Notice Regarding the Availability of Proxy Materials for the Shareholder Meeting to be Held on May 21, 2008 The proxy statement, form of proxy and our 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K are available at www.proxyvote.com


  • Page 9

    2008 ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING AND PROXY STATEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT THE PROXY MATERIALS AND THE ANNUAL MEETING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Why am I receiving these materials? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 What information is contained in this proxy statement? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 How may I obtain Juniper Networks’ 10-K?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 What items of business will be voted on at the annual meeting? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 How does the Board recommend that I vote? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 What shares can I vote? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 What is the difference between holding shares as a shareowner of record and as a beneficial owner? . . 2 How can I attend the annual meeting? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 How can I vote my shares in person at the annual meeting? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 How can I vote my shares without attending the annual meeting? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Can I change my vote or otherwise revoke my proxy? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 How many shares must be present or represented to conduct business at the annual meeting? . . . . . . . 3 Will my shares be voted if I do not return my proxy card? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 How are votes counted?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 What is the voting requirement to approve each of the proposals? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Is cumulative voting permitted for the election of directors? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 What happens if additional matters are presented at the annual meeting? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 What should I do if I receive more than one set of voting materials? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 How may I obtain a separate set of voting materials? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Who will bear the cost of soliciting votes for the annual meeting? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Where can I find the voting results of the annual meeting? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 What is the deadline to propose actions for consideration or to nominate individuals to serve as directors? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CORPORATE GOVERNANCE PRINCIPLES AND BOARD MATTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Board Independence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Board Structure and Committee Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Identification and Evaluation of Nominees for Directors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Stockholder Communications with the Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Policy on Director Attendance at Annual Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 DIRECTOR COMPENSATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Non-Employee Director Compensation Table For Fiscal 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 PROPOSALS TO BE VOTED ON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 PROPOSAL NO. 1 Election of Directors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 PROPOSAL NO. 2 Approval of the Juniper Networks, Inc. 2008 Employee Stock Purchase Plan . . . . 17 PROPOSAL NO. 3 Ratification of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Beneficial Ownership Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 i


  • Page 10

    CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Compensation Discussion and Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Compensation Committee Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Compensation Committee Interlocks And Insider Participation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Summary Compensation Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Grants of Plan-Based Awards for Fiscal 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal 2007 Year-End . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Option Exercises and Stock Vested For Fiscal 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 EQUITY COMPENSATION PLAN INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 REPORT OF THE AUDIT COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 JUNIPER NETWORKS, INC. 2008 EMPLOYEE STOCK PURCHASE PLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1 ii


  • Page 11

    QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT THE PROXY MATERIALS AND THE ANNUAL MEETING Q: Why am I receiving these materials? A: The Board of Directors (the “Board”) of Juniper Networks, Inc., a Delaware corporation (“we”, “Juniper Networks” or the “Company”), is providing these proxy materials to you in connection with Juniper Networks’ annual meeting of stockholders, which will take place on May 21, 2008. As a stockholder as of March 24, 2008, the record date, you are invited to attend the annual meeting and are entitled to and requested to vote on the items of business described in this proxy statement. Q: What information is contained in this proxy statement? A: The information included in this proxy statement relates to the proposals to be voted on at the annual meeting, the voting process, the compensation of directors and executive officers, and certain other required information. Q: How may I obtain Juniper Networks’ 10-K? A: A copy of our 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K is enclosed. Stockholders may request another free copy of the 2007 Form 10-K from our principal executive offices at: Juniper Networks, Inc. Attn: Investor Relations 1194 North Mathilda Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (408) 745-2000 A copy of our 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K is also available on the website of the Securities and Exchange Commission. You can reach this website by going to the Investor Relations Center on our Website, and clicking on the drop-down menu labeled “SEC Filings”. The address of the Investor Relations Center is: http://www.juniper.net/company/investor_relations/ We will also furnish any exhibit to the 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K if specifically requested in writing. Q: What items of business will be voted on at the annual meeting? A: The items of business scheduled to be voted on at the annual meeting are: • The election of two Class III directors; • To approve the Juniper Networks, Inc. 2008 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “2008 ESPP”); • The ratification of Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as auditors for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2008; and We will also consider other business that properly comes before the annual meeting. Q: How does the Board recommend that I vote? A: Our Board recommends that you vote your shares “FOR” each of the nominees to the Board, “FOR” the approval of the 2008 ESPP, and “FOR” the ratification of Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm as auditors for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2008. Q: What shares can I vote? A: Each share of Juniper Networks common stock issued and outstanding as of the close of business on March 24, 2008, (the “Record Date”), is entitled to be voted on all items being voted upon at the annual meeting. You may vote all shares owned by you as of the Record Date, including (1) shares held directly in your name as the stockholder of record and (2) shares held for you as the beneficial owner through a broker, trustee or other nominee such as a bank. More information on how to vote these shares is contained in this proxy statement. On the Record Date we had approximately 524,225,748 shares of common stock issued and outstanding. 1


  • Page 12

    Q: What is the difference between holding shares as a stockholder of record and as a beneficial owner? A: Most Juniper Networks stockholders hold their shares through a broker or other nominee rather than directly in their own name. As summarized below, there are some distinctions between shares held of record and those owned beneficially, which may affect your ability to vote your shares. Stockholder of Record If your shares are registered directly in your name with Juniper Networks’ transfer agent, Wells Fargo Shareowner Services, you are considered, with respect to those shares, the stockholder of record, and these proxy materials are being sent directly to you by Juniper Networks. As the stockholder of record, you have the right to grant your voting proxy directly to Juniper Networks or to vote in person at the meeting. We have enclosed or sent a proxy card for you to use. Beneficial Owner If your shares are held in a brokerage account or by another nominee, you are considered the beneficial owner of shares held in street name, and these proxy materials are being forwarded to you together with a voting instruction card. As the beneficial owner, you have the right to direct your broker, trustee or nominee how to vote and are also invited to attend the annual meeting. Since a beneficial owner is not the stockholder of record, you may not vote these shares in person at the meeting unless you obtain a “legal proxy” from the broker, trustee or nominee that holds your shares, giving you the right to vote the shares at the meeting. Your broker, trustee or nominee has enclosed or provided voting instructions for you to use in directing the broker, trustee or nominee how to vote your shares. Q: How can I attend the annual meeting? A: You are entitled to attend the annual meeting only if you were a Juniper Networks stockholder as of the close of business on March 24, 2008 or you hold a valid proxy for the annual meeting. You should be prepared to present valid government-issued photo identification for admittance. In addition, if you are a stockholder of record, your name will be verified against the list of stockholders of record on the record date prior to your being admitted to the annual meeting. If you are not a stockholder of record but hold shares through a broker or nominee (i.e., in street name), you should provide proof of beneficial ownership on the record date, such as your most recent account statement prior to March 24, 2008, a copy of the voting instruction card provided by your broker, trustee or nominee, or other similar evidence of ownership. If you do not provide valid government- issued photo identification or comply with the other procedures outlined above upon request, you will not be admitted to the annual meeting. The meeting will begin promptly at 9:00 a.m., Pacific time. Check-in will begin at 8:30 a.m., and you should allow ample time for the check-in procedures. Q: How can I vote my shares in person at the annual meeting? A: Shares held in your name as the stockholder of record may be voted in person at the annual meeting. Shares held beneficially in street name may be voted in person only if you obtain a legal proxy from the broker, trustee or nominee that holds your shares giving you the right to vote the shares. Even if you plan to attend the annual meeting, you may also submit your proxy or voting instructions as described below so that your vote will be counted if you later decide not to attend the meeting. Q: How can I vote my shares without attending the annual meeting? A: Whether you hold shares directly as the stockholder of record or beneficially in street name, you may direct how your shares are voted without attending the meeting. If you are a stockholder of record, you may vote by submitting a proxy. If you hold shares beneficially in street name, you may vote by submitting voting instructions to your broker, trustee or nominee. For directions on how to vote, please refer to the instructions below and those included on your proxy card or, for shares held beneficially in street name, the voting instruction card provided by your broker, trustee or nominee. 2


  • Page 13

    By Internet — Stockholders of record of Juniper Networks common stock with Internet access may submit proxies by following the “Vote by Internet” instructions on their proxy cards. Most Juniper Networks stockholders who hold shares beneficially in street name may vote by accessing the website specified on the voting instruction cards provided by their brokers, trustee or nominees. Please check the voting instruction card for Internet voting availability. By Telephone — Stockholders of record of Juniper Networks common stock who live in the United States or Canada may submit proxies by following the “Vote by Phone” instructions on their proxy cards. Most Juniper Networks stockholders who hold shares beneficially in street name and live in the United States or Canada may vote by phone by calling the number specified on the voting instruction cards provided by their brokers, trustee or nominees. Please check the voting instruction card for telephone voting availability. By Mail — Stockholders of record of Juniper Networks common stock may submit proxies by completing, signing and dating their proxy cards and mailing them in the accompanying pre-addressed envelopes. Juniper Networks stockholders who hold shares beneficially in street name may vote by mail by completing, signing and dating the voting instruction cards provided and mailing them in the accompanying pre-addressed envelopes. Q: Can I change my vote or otherwise revoke my proxy? A: You may change your vote at any time prior to the vote at the annual meeting. If you are the stockholder of record, you may change your vote by granting a new proxy bearing a later date (which automatically revokes the earlier proxy), by providing a written notice of revocation to the Juniper Networks Corporate Secretary prior to your shares being voted, or by attending the annual meeting and voting in person. Attendance at the meeting will not cause your previously granted proxy to be revoked unless you specifically so request. For shares you hold beneficially in street name, you may change your vote by submitting new voting instructions to your broker, trustee or nominee, or, if you have obtained a legal proxy from your broker or nominee giving you the right to vote your shares, by attending the meeting and voting in person. Q: How many shares must be present or represented to conduct business at the annual meeting? A: The quorum requirement for holding the annual meeting and transacting business is that holders of a majority of shares of Juniper Networks common stock entitled to vote must be present in person or represented by proxy. Both abstentions and broker non-votes are counted for the purpose of determining the presence of a quorum. Q: Will my shares be voted if I do not return my proxy card? A: If your shares are held in street name, your broker may, under certain circumstances, vote your shares. Brokerage firms have authority to vote client’s unvoted shares on some “routine” matters. If you do not give a proxy to vote your shares, your broker may either (1) vote your shares on “routine” matters or (2) leave your shares unvoted. In addition, the terms of the agreement with your broker may grant your broker discretionary authority to vote your shares. Q: How are votes counted? A: In the election of directors, you may vote “FOR” all of the nominees or your vote may be “WITHHELD” with respect to one or more of the nominees. For the other items of business, you may vote “FOR,” “AGAINST” or “ABSTAIN.” If you “ABSTAIN,” the abstention has the same effect as a vote “AGAINST.” If you provide specific instructions with regard to certain items, your shares will be voted as you instruct on such items. If you sign your proxy card or voting instruction card without giving specific instructions, your shares will be voted in accordance with the recommendations of the Board (“FOR” all of Juniper Networks’ nominees to the Board, “FOR” approval of the 2008 ESPP and “FOR” ratification of the independent registered public accounting firm) and in the discretion of the proxy holders as to any other matters that may properly come before the annual meeting. 3


  • Page 14

    Q: What is the voting requirement to approve each of the proposals? A: In the election of directors, the two nominees receiving the highest number of “FOR” votes at the annual meeting will be elected. The proposals for the approval of the 2008 ESPP and the ratification of the independent registered public accounting firm requires the affirmative “FOR” vote of a majority of those shares present in person or represented by proxy and entitled to vote on each proposal at the annual meeting. If you hold shares beneficially in street name and do not provide your broker with voting instructions, your shares may constitute “broker non-votes.” Generally, broker non-votes occur on a matter when a broker is not permitted to vote on that matter without instructions from the beneficial owner and instructions are not given. In tabulating the voting result for any particular proposal, shares that constitute broker non-votes are not considered entitled to vote on that proposal. Thus, broker non-votes will not affect the outcome of any matter being voted on at the meeting, assuming that a quorum is obtained. Abstentions have the same effect as votes against the matter. Q: Is cumulative voting permitted for the election of directors? A: No. Each share of common stock outstanding as of the close of business on the Record Date is entitled to one vote. Q: What happens if additional matters are presented at the annual meeting? A: Other than the three items of business described in this proxy statement, we are not aware of any other business to be acted upon at the annual meeting. If you grant a proxy, the persons named as proxyholders, Robyn Denholm and Mitchell Gaynor, will have the discretion to vote your shares on any additional matters properly presented for a vote at the meeting. If for any unforeseen reason any of our nominees is not available as a candidate for director, the persons named as proxy holders will vote your proxy for such other candidate or candidates as may be nominated by the Board of Directors. Q: What should I do if I receive more than one set of voting materials? A: You may receive more than one set of voting materials, including multiple copies of this proxy statement and multiple proxy cards or voting instruction cards. For example, if you hold your shares in more than one brokerage account, you may receive a separate voting instruction card for each brokerage account in which you hold shares. If you are a stockholder of record and your shares are registered in more than one name, you will receive more than one proxy card. Please complete, sign, date and return each proxy card and voting instruction card that you receive. Q: How may I obtain a separate set of voting materials? A: If you share an address with another stockholder, you may receive only one set of proxy materials (including our letter to stockholders, 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K and proxy statement) unless you have provided contrary instructions. If you wish to receive a separate set of proxy materials now or in the future, you may write or call us to request a separate copy of these materials from: Juniper Networks, Inc. Attn: Investor Relations 1194 North Mathilda Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (408) 745-2000 http://www.juniper.net/company/investor_relations/ Similarly, if you share an address with another stockholder and have received multiple copies of our proxy materials, you may write or call us at the above address and phone number to request delivery of a single copy of these materials. Q: Who will bear the cost of soliciting votes for the annual meeting? A: Juniper Networks is making this solicitation and will pay the entire cost of preparing, assembling, printing, mailing and distributing these proxy materials and soliciting votes. If you choose to access the proxy materials and/or vote over the Internet, you are responsible for Internet access charges you may incur. If you choose to 4


  • Page 15

    vote by telephone, you are responsible for telephone charges you may incur. In addition to the mailing of these proxy materials, the solicitation of proxies or votes may be made in person, by telephone or by electronic communication by our directors, officers and employees, who will not receive any additional compensation for such solicitation activities. We also have hired Morrow & Co. to assist us in the distribution of proxy materials and the solicitation of votes described above. We will pay Morrow & Co. a fee of $5,000 plus customary costs and expenses for these services. Upon request, we will also reimburse brokerage houses and other custodians, nominees and fiduciaries for forwarding proxy and solicitation materials to stockholders. Q: Where can I find the voting results of the annual meeting? A: We intend to announce preliminary voting results at the annual meeting and publish final results in our quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of 2008. Q: What is the deadline to propose actions for consideration or to nominate individuals to serve as directors? A: Although the deadline for submitting proposals or director nominations for consideration at the 2008 annual meeting has passed, you may submit proposals, including director nominations, for consideration at future stockholder meetings. Stockholder Proposals: For a stockholder proposal to be considered for inclusion in Juniper Networks’ proxy statement for the annual meeting next year, the written proposal must be received by the Corporate Secretary of Juniper Networks at our principal executive offices no later than December 19, 2008. If the date of next year’s annual meeting is moved more than 30 days before or after the anniversary date of this year’s annual meeting, the deadline for inclusion of proposals in Juniper Networks’ proxy statement is instead a reasonable time before Juniper Networks begins to print and mail its proxy materials. Such proposals also will need to comply with Securities and Exchange Commission regulations under Rule 14a-8 regarding the inclusion of stockholder proposals in company-sponsored proxy materials. Proposals should be addressed to: Juniper Networks, Inc. Attn: Corporate Secretary 1194 North Mathilda Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 Fax: (408) 745-2100 For a stockholder proposal that is not intended to be included in Juniper Networks’ proxy statement under Rule 14a-8, the stockholder must deliver a proxy statement and form of proxy to holders of a sufficient number of shares of Juniper Networks common stock to approve that proposal, provide the information required by the bylaws of Juniper Networks and give timely notice to the Corporate Secretary of Juniper Networks in accordance with our bylaws, which, in general, require that the notice be received by the Corporate Secretary of Juniper Networks not less than 120 days prior to the date of Juniper Networks proxy statement released to stockholders in connection with the previous year’s annual meeting of stockholders, or by December 19, 2008 for the 2009 annual meeting. Recommendation and Nomination of Director Candidates: The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee will consider both recommendations and nominations for candidates to the Board of Directors from Qualifying Stockholders. A “Qualifying Stockholder” is a stockholder that has owned for a period of one year prior to the date of the submission of the recommendation through the time of submission of the recommen- dation at least 1% of the total common stock of the Company outstanding as of the last day of the calendar month preceding the submission. A Qualifying Stockholder that desires to recommend a candidate for election to the Board of Directors must direct the recommendation in writing to Juniper Networks, Inc., Corporate Secretary, 1194 North Mathilda Avenue, Sunnyvale, California 94089-1206, and must include the candidate’s name, home and business contact information, detailed biographical data and qualifications, information regarding any relationships between the candidate and the Company within the last three years, written evidence that the candidate is willing to serve as a director of the Company if nominated and elected and evidence of the nominating person’s ownership of Company stock. 5


  • Page 16

    A stockholder that instead desires to nominate a person directly for election to the Board of Directors must meet the deadlines and other requirements set forth in Section 2.5 of the Company’s bylaws and the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission. To be timely, such stockholder’s notice must be delivered to or mailed and received by the Corporate Secretary of the Company not less than one hundred twenty (120) days prior to the date of the Company’s proxy statement released to stockholders in connection with the Company’s previous year’s annual meeting of stockholders. To be in proper form, a stockholder’s notice to the Secretary shall set forth: (i) the name and address of the stockholder who intends to make the nominations and the name and address of the person or persons to be nominated; (ii) a representation that the stockholder is a holder of record of stock of the Company entitled to vote at such meeting and, if applicable, intends to appear in person or by proxy at the meeting to nominate the person or persons specified in the notice; (iii) if applicable, a description of all arrangements or understandings between the stockholder and each nominee and any other person or persons (naming such person or persons) pursuant to which the nomination or nominations are to be made by the stockholder; (iv) such other information regarding each nominee as would be required to be included in a proxy statement filed pursuant to the proxy rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission had the nominee been nominated, or intended to be nominated by the Board of Directors; and (v) if applicable, the consent of each nominee to serve as director of the Company if so elected. Copy of Bylaws: You may contact the Juniper Networks Corporate Secretary at our principal executive offices for a copy of the relevant bylaw provisions regarding the requirements for making stockholder proposals and nominating director candidates. 6


  • Page 17

    CORPORATE GOVERNANCE PRINCIPLES AND BOARD MATTERS Juniper Networks is committed to having sound corporate governance principles. Having such principles is essential to running our business efficiently and to maintaining our integrity in the marketplace. Juniper Networks’ Corporate Governance Standards and Worldwide Code of Business Conduct and Ethics applicable to all Juniper Networks employees, officers, directors, contractors and agents are available at http://www.juniper.net/company/investor_relations/. Our World- wide Code of Business Conduct and Ethics complies with the rules of the SEC, the listing standards of the NASDAQ Global Select Market and Rule 406 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Juniper Networks has also adopted procedures for accounting and auditing matters in compliance with the listing standards of the NASDAQ Global Select Market. Concerns relating to accounting, internal controls or auditing matters may be brought to the attention of either the Company’s Concerns Committee (comprised of the Company’s Chief Financial Officer, General Counsel, Executive Vice President of Human Resources, Corporate Controller and the Senior Director of Global Audit Services), or to the Audit Committee directly. Concerns are handled in accordance with procedures established with respect to such matters. For information on how to contact the Audit Committee directly, please see the section entitled “Stockholder Communications with the Board” below. Board Independence Our Board of Directors (the “Board”) has determined that, except for Scott Kriens and Pradeep Sindhu, each of whom is an executive officer of the company, each of the current directors has no material relationship with Juniper Networks (either directly or as a partner, stockholder or officer of an organization that has a material relationship with Juniper Networks) and is independent within the meaning of the NASDAQ Stock Market, Inc. (“NASDAQ”) director independence standards. Furthermore, the Board has determined that each of the members of each of the committees of the Board has no material relationship with Juniper Networks (either directly or as a partner, stockholder or officer of an organization that has a material relationship with Juniper Networks) and is “inde- pendent” within the meaning of the NASDAQ director independence standards, including in the case of the members of the Audit Committee, the heightened “independence” standard required for such committee members set forth in the applicable SEC rules. In making the determination of the independence of our directors, the Board considered all transactions in which Juniper Networks and any director had any interest, including transactions involving Juniper Networks and payments made to or from companies and entities in the ordinary course of business where our directors serve as partners, directors or as a member of the executive management of the other company. In particular, the Board considered transactions between Juniper Networks and each of Ariba, Inc., where Mr. Robert Calderoni serves as President and Chief Executive Officer, and Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP, where Ms. Mary Cranston serves as Firm Senior Partner. We lease office space from Ariba, approximately two- thirds of which is pursuant to an agreement originally entered into by NetScreen Technologies, Inc. and Ariba prior to our acquisition of NetScreen in 2004. This agreement was negotiated and is maintained at arms-length, and we do not believe it is material to the results of operations or business of Juniper Networks. In addition, Pillsbury was retained by our Audit Committee as counsel to the Audit Committee in connection with their independent investigation into our historical stock option practices, which investigation was substantially completed in December 2006. Ms. Cranston joined our board in November 2007 and was not involved in Pillsbury’s repre- sentation of Juniper Networks. In each case, the Board determined that the nature, size and circumstances of the relationships between Juniper Networks and each of Ariba and Pillsbury did not preclude a determination of independence of Mr. Calderoni or Ms. Cranston under applicable SEC and NASDAQ rules. Board Structure and Committee Composition As of December 31, 2007, our Board had 10 directors divided into three classes — Class I, Class II and Class III — with a three-year term for each class. As of December 31, 2007, the classes were comprised as follows: Class I Class II Class III (Term Expires in 2009) (Term Expires in 2010) (Term Expires this Year) Scott Kriens Pradeep Sindhu Mary B. Cranston Stratton Sclavos Robert M. Calderoni Kenneth Goldman* William R. Stensrud Michael Rose William R. Hearst III** J. Michael Lawrie 7


  • Page 18

    * In January 2008, Mr. Goldman resigned from the Board. Mr. Goldman’s decision to resign was due to his appointment in 2007 as an executive officer of a competitor of Juniper Networks, and was not due to any disagreement with Juniper Networks on any matters relating to our operations, policies or practices. ** In addition, in February 2008, Mr. Hearst informed the Board that he would retire from and not stand for re- election to the Board effective upon the expiration of his current term in 2008. Mr. Hearst’s decision was not due to any disagreement with Juniper Networks on any matters relating to our operations, policies or practices. As such, he will not stand for re-election at the 2008 annual meeting. The Board has a standing Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. The membership during the last fiscal year and the function of each of the committees are described below. Each of these committees operates under a written charter adopted by the Board. All of those committee charters are available on Juniper Networks’ website at http://www.juniper.net/company/investor_relations/. In addition, the Board has a Stock Committee comprised of the Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and beginning in February 2007, a non- employee director, currently Mr. Stensrud. The Stock Committee has authority to grant stock options and restricted stock awards to employees who are not executive officers. During 2007, the Stock Committee held ten meetings, and took action by written consent twice. The Board has also established special litigation, securities pricing and stock repurchase committees for specific purposes, such as oversight of, litigation matters the issuance of securities or repurchases of our common stock. During 2007, the Special Litigation Committee, consisting of Messrs. Lawrie and Rose, met four times and the Stock Repurchase Committee, consisting of Messrs. Kriens, Calderoni, Goldman and Stensrud, met once. During 2007, each incumbent director attended at least 75% of all Board and applicable committee meetings. Nominating and Corporate Name of Director Board Audit Compensation Governance Non-Employee Directors: Robert M. Calderoni(1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X X Mary B. Cranston(2). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X X Kenneth Goldman(3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X X X William R. Hearst III(4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X X X J. Michael Lawrie(5) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X X Frank Marshall(6) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X X Kenneth Levy(7) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X X X Michael Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X X Stratton Sclavos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X X William R. Stensrud(8) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X X X X Employee Directors: Scott Kriens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X Pradeep Sindhu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . X Number of Meetings in Fiscal 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 14 6 5 X = Committee member (1) The Board has determined that Mr. Calderoni is an “audit committee financial expert” within the meaning of the rules promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission. (2) Ms. Cranston was appointed to the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee in February 2008. (3) Mr. Goldman resigned from the Board in January 2008 and was replaced on the Audit Committee by Mr. Stensrud. (4) Mr. Hearst stepped down from the Audit Committee in August 2007 and was replaced on the committee by Mr. Rose. (5) Mr. Lawrie is the Board’s Lead Independent Director. (6) Mr. Marshall resigned from the Board in February 2007. 8


  • Page 19

    (7) Mr. Levy’s term as a director expired on May 17, 2007 and he did not seek re-election to the Board. (8) Mr. Stensrud stepped down from the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee in August 2007 and was replaced on the committee by Mr. Hearst. Audit Committee The Audit Committee assists the Board in fulfilling its responsibilities for general oversight of the integrity of Juniper Networks’ financial statements, Juniper Networks’ compliance with legal and regulatory requirements, the independent registered public accounting firm’s qualifications and independence, the performance of Juniper Networks’ internal audit function and independent registered public accounting firm, and risk assessment and risk management. The Audit Committee works closely with management as well as our independent registered public accounting firm. The Audit Committee has the authority to obtain advice and assistance from, and receive appropriate funding from Juniper Networks for, outside legal, accounting or other advisors as the Audit Committee deems necessary to carry out its duties. The report of the Audit Committee is included herein on page 47. The charter of the Audit Committee is available at http://www.juniper.net/company/investor_relations/. Compensation Committee The Compensation Committee discharges the Board’s responsibilities relating to compensation of our executive officers, including evaluation of the CEO; produces an annual report on executive compensation, including compensation discussion and analysis, for inclusion in Juniper Networks’ proxy statement and has overall responsibility for approving and evaluating executive officer compensation plans. The Compensation Committee also has responsibility for reviewing the overall equity award practices of the Company. The report of the Compensation Committee is included herein beginning on page 39. The charter of the Compensation Committee is available at http://www.juniper.net/company/investor_relations/. Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee identifies individuals qualified to become Board members, consistent with criteria approved by the Board; oversees the organization of the Board to discharge the Board’s duties and responsibilities properly and efficiently; and identifies best practices and recommends corporate governance principles, including giving proper attention and making effective responses to stockholder concerns regarding corporate governance. The charter of the Nominating and Governance Committee is available at http://www.juniper.net/company/investor_relations/. Identification and Evaluation of Nominees for Directors The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee’s criteria and process for evaluating and identifying the candidates that it selects, or recommends to the full Board for selection, as director nominees, are as follows: • The Committee regularly reviews the current composition and size of the Board. • The Committee reviews the qualifications of any candidates who have been properly recommended or nominated by a stockholder, as well as those candidates who have been identified by management, individual members of the Board or, if the Committee determines, a search firm. Such review may, in the Committee’s discretion, include a review solely of information provided to the Committee or may also include discussions with persons familiar with the candidate, an interview with the candidate or other actions that the Committee deems proper. • The Committee evaluates the performance of the Board as a whole and evaluates the qualifications of individual members of the Board eligible for re-election at the annual meeting of stockholders. • The Committee considers the suitability of each candidate, including the current members of the Board, in light of the current size and composition of the Board. In evaluating the qualifications of the candidates, the Committee considers many factors, including, issues of character, judgment, independence, age, expertise, 9


  • Page 20

    diversity of experience, length of service, other commitments, ability to serve on committees of the Board and the like. The Committee evaluates such factors, among others, and does not assign any particular weighting or priority to any of these factors. The Committee considers each individual candidate in the context of the current perceived needs of the Board as a whole. While the Committee has not established specific minimum qualifications for director candidates, the Committee believes that candidates and nominees must reflect a Board that is comprised of directors who (i) are predominantly independent, (ii) are of high integrity, (iii) have qualifications that will increase overall Board effectiveness and (iv) meet other requirements as may be required by applicable rules, such as financial literacy or financial expertise with respect to audit committee members. • In evaluating and identifying candidates, the Committee has the authority to retain and terminate any third party search firm that is used to identify director candidates, and has the authority to approve the fees and retention terms of any search firm. • After such review and consideration, the Committee selects, or recommends that the Board of Directors select, the slate of director nominees, either at a meeting of the Committee at which a quorum is present or by unanimous written consent of the Committee. J. Michael Lawrie was appointed to the Board as a Class III director in February 2007. The recommendation that Mr. Lawrie be considered for appointment to the Board was submitted to the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee by Mr. Kriens. Michael J. Rose was appointed to the Board as a Class II director in July 2007. The recommendation that Mr. Rose be considered for appointment to the Board was submitted to the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee by Mr. Kriens. Mary B. Cranston was appointed to the Board as a Class III director in November 2007. The recommendation that Ms. Cranston be considered for appointment to the Board was submitted to the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee by Mr. Sclavos. Each of the nominees for re-election at the 2008 annual meeting was evaluated by the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee, recommended by the Committee to the Board for nomination and nominated by the Board for re-election. In February 2008, Mr. Hearst informed the Board that he will retire from the Board upon the expiration of his current term and will not stand for re-election at the 2008 annual meeting. Stockholder Communications with the Board Stockholders of Juniper Networks, Inc. and other parties interested in communicating with the Board may contact any of our directors by writing to them by mail or express mail c/o Juniper Networks, Inc., 1194 North Mathilda Avenue, Sunnyvale, California 94089-1206. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee of the Board has approved a process for handling stockholder communications received by the Company. Under that process, the General Counsel receives and logs stockholder communications directed to the Board and, unless marked “confidential”, reviews all such correspondence and regularly (not less than quarterly) forwards to the Board a summary of such correspondence and copies of such correspondence. Communications marked “con- fidential” will be logged as received by the General Counsel and then will be forwarded to the addressee(s). Policy on Director Attendance at Annual Meetings Although we do not have a formal policy regarding attendance by members of the Board at our annual meetings of stockholders, directors are encouraged to attend annual meetings of Juniper Networks stockholders. Seven of our eight incumbent directors attended the 2007 annual meeting of stockholders. 10


  • Page 21

    DIRECTOR COMPENSATION Non-Employee Director Meeting Fee and Retainer Information The following table provides information on Juniper Networks’ compensation and reimbursement practices during fiscal 2007 for non-employee directors. Annual retainer for all Non-employee Directors (payable quarterly) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30,000 Additional annual retainer for Audit Committee members (payable quarterly) . . . . . . . . . . $10,000 Additional annual retainer for Compensation Committee members (payable quarterly) . . . . $ 5,000 Additional annual retainer for Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee members (payable quarterly) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 5,000 Additional annual retainer for Audit Committee Chairman (payable quarterly) . . . . . . . . . . $20,000 Additional annual retainer for Compensation Committee Chairman (payable quarterly) . . . $ 5,000 Additional annual retainer for Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee Chairman (payable quarterly) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 5,000 Stock options granted upon initial appointment or election to the Board(1) . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 Stock options granted annually(2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20,000(3) Payment for each Board meeting attended in person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,250 Payment for each Board meeting attended by phone or video conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 625 Payment for each committee meeting attended in person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 625 Payment for each committee meeting attended by phone or video conference. . . . . . . . . . . $312.50 Payment for each Audit Committee meeting relating to the stock option investigation or each meeting of the Special Litigation Committee attended in person or by phone or video conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,250 Reimbursement for expenses attendant to Board membership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes (1) Vests monthly over three years commencing on the date of grant with the last 1/36th vesting on the day prior to our annual stockholder meeting in the third calendar year following the date of grant. (2) Vests monthly over twelve months commencing on the date of grant. (3) Each non-employee director who was not a non-employee director on the date of the prior year’s annual stockholder meeting receives an option covering the number of shares of Common Stock determined by multiplying 20,000 shares by a fraction, the numerator of which is the number of days since the non-employee director received his/her option upon initial appointment to the Board, and the denominator of which is 365, rounded down to the nearest whole share. 11


  • Page 22

    Non-Employee Director Compensation Table For Fiscal 2007 The following table shows compensation information for our current and former non-employee directors for fiscal 2007. Neither Mr. Kriens nor Dr. Sindhu received any separate compensation for their Board activities. Non-Employee Director Compensation for Fiscal 2007 Change in Pension Value and Fees Nonqualified Earned Non-Equity Deferred or Paid Stock Option Incentive Plan Compensation All Other Name in Cash Awards Awards(1) Compensation Earnings Compensation Total Robert M. Calderoni(2) . . . . . $52,813 — $137,993 — — — $190,806 Mary Cranston(3) . . . . . . . . . — — $ 24,863 $ 24,863 Kenneth Goldman(4) . . . . . . $77,188 — $137,993 — — — $215,181 William R. Hearst III(5) . . . . $53,438 — $137,993 — — — $191,431 J. Michael Lawrie(6). . . . . . . $47,500 — $114,944 — — — $162,444 Kenneth Levy(7). . . . . . . . . . $14,688 — $ 43,275 — — — $ 57,963 Frank Marshall(8) . . . . . . . . . $10,313 — $ 92,014 — — — $102,327 Michael Rose(9) . . . . . . . . . . $29,375 — $ 68,943 $ 98,318 Stratton Sclavos(10) . . . . . . . $44,063 — $137,993 — — — $182,056 William R. Stensrud(11) . . . . $56,250 — $137,993 — — — $194,243 (1) Amounts shown do not reflect compensation actually received by the director. Instead, the amounts shown are the compensation costs recognized by Juniper Networks in fiscal 2007 for option awards as determined pursuant to FAS 123R disregarding forfeiture assumptions. These compensation costs reflect option awards granted in 2007 and years prior to fiscal 2007. The assumptions used to calculate the value of option awards are set forth under Note 9 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Juniper Networks Annual Report on Form 10-K for 2007 filed with the SEC on February 29, 2008. (2) As of December 31, 2007, Mr. Calderoni held outstanding options to purchase 112,300 shares of the Company’s common stock. The aggregate grant date fair value for the stock option award granted to Mr. Calderoni on May 17, 2007 was $152,048. (3) As of December 31, 2007, Ms. Cranston held outstanding options to purchase 50,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. The aggregate grant date fair value for the stock option award granted to Ms. Cranston on November 14, 2007 was $579,775. (4) As of December 31, 2007, Mr. Goldman held outstanding options to purchase 144,508 shares of the Company’s common stock. The aggregate grant date fair value for the stock option award granted to Mr. Goldman on May 17, 2007 was $152,048. (5) As of December 31, 2007, Mr. Hearst held outstanding options to purchase 109,445 shares of the Company’s common stock. The aggregate grant date fair value for the stock option award granted to Mr. Hearst on May 17, 2007 was $152,048. (6) As of December 31, 2007, Mr. Lawrie held outstanding options to purchase 54,712 shares of the Company’s common stock. The aggregate grant date fair value for the stock option award granted to Mr. Lawrie on February 20, 2007 was $348,685. The aggregate grant date fair value for the stock option award granted to Mr. Lawrie on May 17, 2007 was $35,823. (7) As of December 31, 2007, Mr. Levy held no outstanding options. Mr. Levy did not receive any new option awards in 2007. (8) As of December 31, 2007, Mr. Marshall held no outstanding options. Mr. Marshall did not receive any new option awards in 2007. 12


  • Page 23

    (9) As of December 31, 2007, Mr. Rose held outstanding options to purchase 50,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. The aggregate grant date fair value for the stock option award granted to Mr. Rose on July 17, 2007 was $452,465. (10) As of December 31, 2007, Mr. Sclavos held outstanding options to purchase 220,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. The aggregate grant date fair value for the stock option award granted to Mr. Sclavos on May 17, 2007 was $152,048. (11) As of December 31, 2007, Mr. Stensrud held outstanding options to purchase 200,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. The aggregate grant date fair value for the stock option award granted to Mr. Stensrud on May 17, 2007 was $152,048. 13


  • Page 24

    PROPOSALS TO BE VOTED ON PROPOSAL NO. 1 ELECTION OF DIRECTORS There are two nominees for election to Class III of the Board this year — Mary B. Cranston and J. Michael Lawrie. Each of the nominees is presently a member of the Board. Information regarding the business experience of each nominee and the other members of the Board is provided below. Each of the Class III directors are elected to serve a three-year term until the Company’s annual meeting in 2011 and until their respective successors is elected. There are no family relationships among our executive officers and directors. In February 2008, William R. Hearst III informed the Board that he will retire from the Board upon the expiration of his current term and will not stand for re-election at the 2008 annual meeting. As of the date of this proxy statement, we had not identified a suitable nominee to replace Mr. Hearst on the Board. Accordingly, at the 2008 annual meeting there will be fewer persons nominated for election as Class III directors than are authorized to be elected under our current bylaws and no other nominations were submitted by the deadline for nominations. Votes may not be cast in person or by proxy at the 2008 annual meeting for greater than two nominees to the Board. If you sign your proxy or voting instruction card but do not give instructions with respect to the voting of directors, your shares will be voted for the two persons recommended by the Board. If you wish to give specific instructions with respect to the voting of directors, you may do so by indicating your instructions on your proxy or voting instruction card. Our Board recommends a vote “FOR” the election to the Board of Mary B. Cranston and J. Michael Lawrie. Vote Required The two persons receiving the highest number of “FOR” votes represented by shares of Juniper Networks common stock present in person or represented by proxy and entitled to be voted at the annual meeting will be elected. Nominees for Election Mary B. Cranston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ms. Cranston is currently the Firm Senior Partner of Pillsbury Director since 2007 Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP, an international law firm. She was Age 60 the Chair and Chief Executive Officer of Pillsbury from January 1999 until April 2006, and continued to serve as Chair of Pillsbury until December 2006. She also serves as a member of the board of directors of Visa, Inc., a financial services company, and GrafTech International, Ltd., a manufacturer of carbon and graphite products. J. Michael Lawrie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. Lawrie has served as Chief Executive Officer of Misys plc, a UK-based Director since 2007 provider of industry-specific software products and solutions, since Age 54 November 2006. From October 2005 to November 2006, Mr. Lawrie served as a partner of ValueAct Capital. From May 2004 to April 2005 Mr. Lawrie served as Chief Executive Officer of Siebel Systems, Inc. From May 2001 to May 2004, Mr. Lawrie served as Senior Vice President and Group Executive at IBM responsible for sales and distribution of all IBM products and services worldwide. Mr. Lawrie also serves as a National Trustee for the Ohio University board of trustees. 14


  • Page 25

    Continuing Directors Scott Kriens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. Kriens has served as Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Director since 1996 Board of Directors of Juniper Networks since October 1996. From Age 50 April 1986 to January 1996, Mr. Kriens served as Vice President of Sales and Vice President of Operations at StrataCom, Inc., a telecommunications equipment company, which he co-founded in 1986. Mr. Kriens also serves on the boards of directors of Equinix, Inc. and VeriSign, Inc. Robert M. Calderoni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. Calderoni has served as President and Chief Executive Officer and a Director since 2003 member of the board of directors of Ariba, Inc., a provider of spend Age 48 management solutions, since October 2001. From January 2001 to October 2001, Mr. Calderoni served as Ariba’s Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. From November 1997 to January 2001, he served as Chief Financial Officer at Avery Dennison Corporation, a manufacturer of pressure-sensitive materials and office products. From June 1996 to November 1997, Mr. Calderoni served as Senior Vice President of Finance at Apple Computer, a provider of hardware and software products and Internet-based services. Michael J. Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. Rose is the retired Executive Vice President and Chief Information Director since 2007 Officer of Royal Dutch Shell plc where he served from 2001 to Age 55 December 2005. Prior to Royal Dutch Shell, Mr. Rose worked for 23 years in a wide range of positions at Hewlett Packard, including controller for various business groups. In 1997, he was named Hewlett Packard’s Chief Information Officer, and in 2000 he was elected an officer by the Board of Directors of Hewlett Packard. He was named the company’s Controller in 2001. Mr. Rose also serves on the board of directors of Brocade Communications Systems, a storage area network equipment company. Stratton Sclavos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. Sclavos has served as a General Partner of Radar Partners LLC, a Director since 2000 venture capital firm, since November 2007. From July 1995 to May 2007, Age 46 Mr. Sclavos served as President and Chief Executive Officer of VeriSign, Inc., a provider of digital infrastructure solutions, and Chairman of its board of directors from December 2001 to May 2007. From October 1993 to June 1995, he was Vice President, Worldwide Marketing and Sales of Taligent, Inc., a software development company that was a joint venture among Apple Computer, Inc., IBM and Hewlett-Packard. Prior to that time, he served in various sales, business development and marketing capacities for GO Corporation, MIPS Computer Systems, Inc. and Megatest Corporation. Mr. Sclavos also serves on the boards of directors of Salesforce.com and Intuit, Inc. Pradeep Sindhu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Sindhu co-founded Juniper Networks in February 1996 and served Director since 1996 as Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Directors Age 55 until September 1996. Since then, Dr. Sindhu has served as Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Technical Officer of Juniper Networks. From September 1984 to February 1991, Dr. Sindhu worked as a Member of the Research Staff, and from March 1987 to February 1996, as the Principal Scientist, and from February 1994 to February 1996, as Distinguished Engineer at the Computer Science Lab, Xerox Corporation, Palo Alto Research Center, a technology research center. 15


  • Page 26

    William R. Stensrud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. Stensrud is an independent investor. From January 2007 to Director since 1996 March 2007, he served as Chairman and CEO of Muze, Inc., a Age 57 provider of B2B digital commerce solutions and descriptive entertainment media information. Mr. Stensrud was a general partner with the venture capital firm of Enterprise Partners from January 1997 to December 2006. Mr. Stensrud was an independent investor and turn-around executive from March 1996 to January 1997. During this period, Mr. Stensrud served as President of Paradyne Corporation and as a director of Paradyne Corporation, GlobeSpan Corporation and Paradyne Partners LLP, all data networking companies. From January 1992 to July 1995, Mr. Stensrud served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Primary Access Corporation, a data networking company acquired by 3Com Corporation. From 1986 to 1992, Mr. Stensrud served as the Marketing Vice President of StrataCom, Inc., a telecommunications equipment company, which Mr. Stensrud co-founded. 16


  • Page 27

    PROPOSAL NO. 2 APPROVAL OF THE JUNIPER NETWORKS, INC. 2008 EMPLOYEE STOCK PURCHASE PLAN The following is a summary of the principal provisions of the Juniper Networks, Inc. 2008 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, or the 2008 ESPP. The 2008 ESPP was adopted to replace the 1999 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, which is due to expire in early 2009. The 2008 ESPP is generally similar to the expiring plan. This summary is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full text of the 2008 ESPP which is attached to this proxy statement as Appendix A. Purchase Plan Background In February 2008, the Board of Directors adopted the 2008 ESPP, subject to approval by our stockholders. Each offering under the 2008 ESPP will be for a period of six months and will consist of consecutive offering periods of approximately six months in length. Offering periods begin on February 1 and August 1, or if such date is not a “trading day” (as defined in the 2008 ESPP), the next trading day, with the first such offering period anticipated to commence on February 1, 2009 (assuming stockholders approve the 2008 ESPP). Each participant will be granted an option on the first day of the offering period and the option will be automatically exercised on the last day of each offering period during the offering period using the contributions the participant has made for this purpose. The purchase price for the common stock purchased under the 2008 ESPP is 85% of the lesser of the fair market value of the common stock on the first business day of the applicable offering period and on the last business day of the applicable offering period. The 2008 ESPPAdministrator (as described below) has the power to change the duration of offering periods. Our 1999 Employee Stock Purchase Plan is currently in effect, with the current offering period under that plan having commenced on February 1, 2008 and scheduled to end no later than July 31, 2008. If the 2008 ESPP is approved by our stockholders, we will terminate the 1999 Employee Stock Purchase Plan immediately following the conclusion of the offering period ending January 30, 2009, and the remaining shares reserved for issuance thereunder, which as of March 1, 2008 was 13,149,032 shares, would no longer be available under the 1999 Employee Stock Purchase Plan. Shares Subject to the 2008 ESPP The Board has reserved an aggregate of 12,000,000 shares of Juniper Networks common stock for issuance under the 2008 ESPP. In contrast to the 1999 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, which had automatic annual increases to the shares reserved under such plan, no further increases can be made to the shares reserved for issuance under the 2008 ESPP without the approval of our stockholders. Administration The 2008 ESPP may generally be administered by the Board or a committee of the Board (as applicable, the “Administrator”). The Administrator has the authority to construe and interpret any of the provisions of the 2008 ESPP. International Stock Purchase Rights To provide us with greater flexibility in structuring our equity compensation programs for our non-U.S. employees, the 2008 ESPP also permits us to grant our non-U.S. employees rights to purchase stock pursuant to rules or sub-plans adopted by the Administrator in order to achieve tax, securities law or other compliance objectives (“International Awards”). While the 2008 ESPP is intended to be an “employee stock purchase plan” within the meaning of Section 423 of the Internal Revenue Code (“Section 423”), these International Awards will 17


  • Page 28

    not qualify under Section 423. See “Federal Tax Consequences” below for a discussion of tax consequences under Section 423. Eligibility Employees generally are eligible to participate in the 2008 ESPP if they are customarily employed by Juniper Networks or by a participating subsidiary for more than twenty (20) hours per week and more than five (5) months in any calendar year. International Awards may be made to employees customarily employed for fewer hours or months Eligible employees may select a rate of payroll deduction between 1% and 10% of their compensation and are subject to certain maximum purchase limitations. As of March 31, 2008, approximately 5,800 employees, including all of our executive officers, would be eligible to participate in the 2008 ESPP. For the offering period under our 1999 Employee Stock Purchase Plan that concluded on January 31, 2008, 3,540 employees actually participated in such offering. Special Limitations The 2008 ESPP imposes certain limitations upon a participant’s rights to acquire common stock, including the following limitations: • Purchase rights may not be granted to any individual who owns stock, including stock purchasable under any outstanding purchase rights, possessing 5% or more of the total combined voting power or value of all classes of stock of Juniper Networks or any of its affiliates; • Purchase rights granted to a participant may not permit the individual to accrue the right to purchase our common stock at an annual rate of more than $25,000, valued at the time each purchase right is granted; and • Unless otherwise approved by the Administrator in advance for future offering periods, no participant will be permitted to purchase during any twelve (12) month period more than six thousand (6,000) shares of the Common Stock (subject to any adjustment pursuant to stock splits, recapitalizations, dividends or other similar events). Termination of Purchase Rights A purchase right will terminate upon the participant’s election to withdraw from the 2008 ESPP. Any payroll deductions that the participant may have made with respect to the terminated purchase right will be refunded to the participant if the election to withdraw from the 2008 ESPP is received by Juniper Networks prior to the end of an offering period. A participant’s election to withdraw from the 2008 ESPP is irrevocable, and the participant may not rejoin the offering period for which the terminated purchase right was granted. A purchase right will also terminate upon the participant’s termination of employment. Any payroll deductions that the participant may have made during the offering period in which the termination occurs will be refunded to the participant. In addition, Juniper Networks has specifically reserved the right, exercisable in the sole discretion of the Administrator to terminate the 2008 ESPP, or any offering period thereunder, at any time. Stockholder Rights No participant will have any stockholder rights with respect to the shares covered by his or her purchase rights until the shares are actually purchased on the participant’s behalf. No adjustment will be made for dividends, distributions or other rights for which the record date is prior to the date of the purchase. 18


  • Page 29

    Assignability No purchase rights will be assignable or transferable by the participant, except by will or the laws of inheritance following the participant’s death. Each purchase right will, during the lifetime of the participant, be exercisable only by the participant. Mergers, Consolidations and Change in Control The 2008 ESPP provides that, in the event of the proposed dissolution or liquidation of Juniper Networks, the offering period will terminate immediately prior to the consummation of the proposed action, provided that the Administrator may, in its sole discretion, fix an earlier date for termination of the 2008 ESPP and provide each participant the opportunity to purchase shares under the 2008 ESPP prior to the termination. The 2008 ESPP also provides that, in the event of certain merger or “change-in-control” transactions, in the event that the successor corporation refuses to assume or substitute for the option under an ongoing offering period, the offering period with respect to which such option relates will be shortened by setting a new exercise date that occurs before the date of the Company’s proposed merger or change in control. Amendment of the Plan The Administrator has the authority to amend, terminate or extend the term of the 2008 ESPP, except that stockholder approval is required to increase the number of shares that may be issued under the 2008 ESPP. The 2008 ESPP will terminate in 2028, on the twentieth anniversary of the date of its adoption by our Board, unless terminated earlier under the terms of the 2008 ESPP. The effect of termination is that no new offering periods will commence under the 2008 ESPP, but any outstanding offering periods will continue according to their terms. Federal Tax Consequences Except with respect to International Awards, the 2008 ESPP is intended to be an “employee stock purchase plan” within the meaning of Section 423 of the Internal Revenue Code. Under such a plan, no taxable income will be reportable by a participant, and no deductions will be allowable to Juniper Networks, as a result of the grant or exercise of the purchase rights issued under the 2008 ESPP. Taxable income will not be recognized until there is a sale or other disposition of the shares acquired under the 2008 ESPP or in the event the participant should die while still owning the purchased shares. If the participant sells or otherwise disposes of the purchased shares within two years after commencement of the offering period during which those shares were purchased or within one year of the date of purchase, the participant will recognize ordinary income in the year of sale or disposition equal to the amount by which the fair market value of the shares on the purchase date exceeded the purchase price paid for those shares. If the participant sells or disposes of the purchased shares more than two years after the commencement of the offering period in which those shares were purchased and more than one year from the date of purchase, then the participant will recognize ordinary income in the year of sale or disposition equal to the lesser of the amount by which the fair market value of the shares on the sale or disposition date exceeded the purchase price paid for those shares or 15% of the fair market value of the shares on the date of commencement of such offering period. Any additional gain upon the disposition will be taxed as a capital gain. If the participant still owns the purchased shares at the time of death, the lesser of the amount by which the fair market value of the shares on the date of death exceeds the purchase price or 15% of the fair market value of the shares on the date of commencement of the offering period during which those shares were purchased will constitute ordinary income in the year of death. 19


  • Page 30

    If the purchased shares are sold or otherwise disposed of within two years after commencement of the offering period during which those shares were purchased or within one year after the date of purchase, then Juniper Networks will be entitled to an income tax deduction in the year of sale or disposition equal to the amount of ordinary income recognized by the participant as a result of such sale or disposition. No deduction will be allowed in any other case. New Benefits Under the 2008 ESPP Because awards to employees under the 2008 ESPP are based on voluntary contributions in amounts determined by the participant, the benefits and amounts that will be received or allocated under the 2008 ESPP are not determinable at this time. Therefore, we have not included a table reflecting such benefits or awards. Based on their stockholdings as of March 1, 2008, (determined in accordance with Section 423 of the Code) all of our named executive officers (as defined in “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” below) will be eligible to participate in our 2008 ESPP, except for Robert R.B. Dykes who resigned from the Company in 2007 and Stephen Elop who resigned from the Company in 2008. Only two of our named executive officers currently participate in our 1999 Employee Stock Purchase Plan. None of our non-employee directors will be eligible to participate in the 2008 ESPP. The Board of Directors Recommends a Vote “FOR” Approval of the Juniper Networks, Inc. 2008 Employee Stock Purchase Plan. If you sign your proxy or voting instruction card but do not give specific voting instructions, your shares will be voted for the approval of the Juniper Networks, Inc. 2008 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, as recommended by the Board. Vote Required Approval of the of the Juniper Networks, Inc. 2008 Employee Stock Purchase Plan requires the affirmative vote of a majority of the shares of Juniper Networks common stock present in person or represented by proxy and entitled to be voted at the meeting. 20


  • Page 31

    PROPOSAL NO. 3 RATIFICATION OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM The Audit Committee of the Board has appointed Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, to audit Juniper Networks’ consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2008. During fiscal 2007, Ernst & Young served as Juniper Networks’ independent registered public accounting firm and also provided certain tax and other audit related services. See “Principal Accountant Fees and Services” on page 46. Representatives of Ernst & Young are expected to attend the annual meeting, where they are expected to be available to respond to appropriate questions and, if they desire, to make a statement. Our Board recommends a vote “FOR” the ratification of the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as Juniper Networks’ auditors for the 2008 fiscal year. If the appointment is not ratified, the Audit Committee will consider whether it should select other independent auditors. Even if the appointment is ratified, the Audit Committee, in its discretion, may direct the appointment of a different independent registered public accounting firm as Juniper Networks’ independent auditors at any time during the year if the Audit Committee determines that such a change would be in the Company’s and its stockholders’ best interests. If you sign your proxy or voting instruction card but do not give specific voting instructions, your shares will be voted for the ratification of the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as Juniper Networks’ auditors for the 2008 fiscal year, as recommended by the Board. Vote Required Ratification of the appointment of Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as auditors for fiscal 2008 requires the affirmative vote of a majority of the shares of Juniper Networks common stock present in person or represented by proxy and entitled to be voted at the meeting. 21


  • Page 32

    SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS The following table sets forth information, as of March 1, 2008, concerning: • beneficial owners of more than 5% of Juniper Networks’ common stock; • beneficial ownership by Juniper Networks directors and the named executive officers set forth in the Summary Compensation table on page 40; and • beneficial ownership by all Juniper Networks directors named in this proxy statement and Juniper Networks executive officers as a group. The information provided in the table is based on Juniper Networks’ records, information filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and information provided to Juniper Networks, except where otherwise noted. The number of shares beneficially owned by each entity, person, director or executive officer is determined under rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the information is not necessarily indicative of beneficial ownership for any other purpose. Under such rules, beneficial ownership includes any shares as to which the individual has the sole or shared voting power or investment power and also any shares that the individual has the right to acquire as of April 30, 2008 (60 days after March 1, 2008) through the exercise of any stock option or other right. Unless otherwise indicated, each person has sole voting and investment power (or shares such powers with his or her spouse) with respect to the shares set forth in the following table. In addition, unless otherwise indicated, all persons named below can be reached at Juniper Networks, Inc., 1194 N. Mathilda Avenue, Sunnyvale, California 94089. BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP TABLE Amount and Nature of Beneficial Percent Name and Address of Beneficial Owner Ownership(1) of Class(1) Holders of Greater Than 5% FMR LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63,540,494(2) 12.1% 82 Devonshire Street Boston, MA 02109 T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62,501,612(3) 11.9% 100 E. Pratt Street Baltimore, MD 21202 Directors and Named Executive Officers: Robert M. Calderoni(4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110,633 * Mary Cranston(4). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,944 * Robyn Denholm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 * Robert Dykes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 874 * Stephen Elop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 * Kenneth Goldman(5) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60,494 * William R. Hearst III(6). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 962,697 * Scott Kriens(7) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14,888,215 2.8% J. Michael Lawrie(4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23,763 * Kenneth Levy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 * Frank Marshall(8) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 609,938 * Edward Minshull(4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155,892 * Kim Perdikou(9). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397,979 * Michael Rose(4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,500 * Stratton Sclavos(10) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226,333 * Pradeep Sindhu(11) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,964,310 1.7% William R. Stensrud(12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,367,834 * All Directors and Executive Officers as a Group 28,116,795 5.4% (19 persons)(13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22


  • Page 33

    * Represents holdings of less than one percent. (1) The percentages are calculated using 524,020,999 outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock on March 1, 2008 as adjusted pursuant to Rule 13d-3(d)(1)(i). Pursuant to Rule 13d-3(d)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, beneficial ownership information also includes shares subject to options exercisable within 60 days of March 1, 2008. (2) Based on information reported on Schedule 13G filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 14, 2008. (3) Based on information reported on Schedule 13G filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 13, 2008. These securities are owned by various individual and institutional investors which T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. (“Price Associates”) serves as investment adviser with power to direct investments and/ or sole power to vote the securities. For purposes of the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, Price Associates is deemed to be a beneficial owner of such securities; however, Price Associates expressly disclaims that it is, in fact, the beneficial owner of such securities. (4) Consists of shares which are subject to options that may be exercised within 60 days of March 1, 2008. (5) Includes 39,166 shares which are subject to options that may be exercised within 60 days of March 1, 2008. Mr. Goldman resigned from the Board in January 2008. (6) Includes 107,778 shares which are subject to options that may be exercised within 60 days of March 1, 2008. (7) Includes 9,481,672 shares held by the Kriens 1996 Trust, of which Mr. Kriens and his spouse are the trustees, and 4,951,457 shares which are subject to options that may be exercised within 60 days of March 1, 2008. (8) Includes 192,582 shares held by Big Basin Partners, LP, 88,204 shares held by Timark, LP, of which Mr. Marshall is a general partner and 272,152 shares held by the Frank & Judith Marshall Trust. Mr. Marshall resigned from the Board in February 2007. (9) Includes 384,875 shares which are subject to options that may be exercised within 60 days of March 1, 2008. (10) Includes 218,333 shares which are subject to options that may be exercised within 60 days of March 1, 2008. (11) Includes 1,618,780 shares held by the Sindhu Investments, LP, a family limited partnership; 3,563,370 shares held by the Sindhu Family Trust and 6,867 shares held by Dr. Sindhu’s spouse. Also includes 2,167,082 shares which are subject to options that may be exercised within 60 days of March 1, 2008. (12) Includes 983,101 shares held in a trust as community property and 198,333 shares which are subject to options that may be exercised within 60 days of March 1, 2008. (13) Includes an aggregate of 8,713,578 shares which are subject to options that may be exercised within 60 days of March 1, 2008. SECTION 16(a) BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP REPORTING COMPLIANCE Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, requires our directors, executive officers and holders of more than 10% of Juniper Networks Common Stock to file with the Securities and Exchange Commission reports regarding their ownership and changes in ownership of our securities. We believe that, during fiscal 2007, our directors, executive officers and 10% stockholders complied with all Section 16(a) filing requirements. In making this statement, we have relied upon examination of the copies of Forms 3, 4 and 5, and amendments thereto, provided to Juniper Networks and the written representations of its directors and executive officers. 23


  • Page 34

    CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS The Company’s Worldwide Code of Business Conduct and Ethics (the “Code”) requires that the Company’s employees, officers and directors should avoid conducting Company business with a relative or significant other, or with a business in which a relative or significant other is associated in any significant role (as used in the Code, a “related party transaction”). If the related party transaction involves the Company’s directors or executive officers or is determined by the Company’s Chief Financial Officer to be material to the Company (or if applicable SEC or NASDAQ rules require approval by the Audit Committee), the Audit Committee of the Board, in accordance with the Code and its charter, must review and approve the matter in writing in advance of any such related party transactions. The Company reimburses Mr. Kriens for ordinary operating costs relating to his use of his aircraft for business purposes up to a maximum amount of $650,000 per year. In 2007 Mr. Kriens received approximately $352,000 in such reimbursements. 24


  • Page 35

    EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION Compensation Discussion and Analysis Executive Compensation Philosophy and Objectives The Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors (the “Committee”) recognizes that in order for the Company to successfully develop, introduce, market and sell products, the Company must be able to attract, retain and reward qualified executive officers who will be able to operate effectively in a high growth, complex environment. In that regard, the Company must offer compensation that (a) is competitive in the industry; (b) motivates executive officers to achieve the Company’s strategic business objectives; and (c) aligns the interests of executive officers with the long-term interests of stockholders. The Committee’s intention is to adopt compensation programs that encourage creation of long-term value for stockholders, employee retention, and equity participation. The Committee’s approach is based on the philosophy that a substantial portion of aggregate compensation for executive officers should be contingent upon the Company’s overall performance and an individual’s contribution to the Company’s success in meeting certain critical objectives. In this regard, the Committee historically targeted base salary at approximately the 50th per- centile, or median, relative to competitive market practices, although actual base salaries may be higher or lower than this targeted positioning. Incentive compensation and long term equity awards were intended to target overall compensation at approximately the 50th percentile, although the financial performance of the Company and changes in the market price of the Company’s Common Stock can result in total compensation above or below the target. Overview of Executive Compensation Under the charter of the Compensation Committee, the Committee is comprised entirely of independent directors and has the responsibility for approving compensation for those officers who are designated as reporting officers under Section 16 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (“Section 16 officers”). Generally, the types of compensation and benefits provided to the Section 16 officers are also provided to other non-Section 16 officers reporting to the Chief Executive Officer. Throughout this proxy statement, the individuals who served as the Company’s Chief Executive Officer or Chief Financial Officer during 2007, as well as the other individuals included in the Summary Compensation Table on page 40, are referred to as the “named executive officers”. All of the named executive officers are Section 16 officers. The Committee approves all compensation decisions for the Section 16 officers. The Committee has the authority to engage its own advisors to assist it in carrying out its responsibilities and has approved the Company’s retention of Mercer (US) Inc. (“Mercer”) to provide analysis, advice and guidance from with respect to compen- sation. The Committee is free to replace its compensation advisors or retain additional advisors at any time. Mercer assists the Committee by providing compensation information, analyzing various compensation alternatives and data, and helping to develop recommendations regarding all awards to Section 16 officers. Mercer and Mercer affiliates also provide other services to the Company, including U.S. benefits administration, consulting services related to generally available Company benefit plans, and brokerage services for U.S. and international benefit plans. Mercer generally works with the Company’s Executive Vice President responsible for Human Resources and the Company’s Senior Director of Compensation and Benefits. Mercer provides analysis to the Company and the Committee regarding the Section 16 officer’s compensation relative to external market benchmarks. Mercer also provides information to the Company and the Committee regarding compensation trends, compensation strategy and structure of incentive programs. The Chief Executive Officer annually reviews the performance of each Section 16 officer (other than the Chief Executive Officer whose performance is reviewed by the Committee). As Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Scott Kriens is responsible for making a recommendation regarding the salary, incentive target and equity awards for each individual Section 16 officer other than himself, based on the analysis and guidance provided by the Committee’s advisors and on his assessment of the performance of the individuals. He is assisted by the Executive Vice President, 25


  • Page 36

    Human Resources and the Senior Director of Compensation and Benefits in these recommendations to the Committee regarding compensation for Section 16 officers. Performance factors considered in developing rec- ommendations for the Committee include the applicable officer’s leadership, strategic planning, delivery of financial results (if such officer is responsible for such results, such as a general manager of a business group), and succession planning. Mr. Kriens takes an active part in the discussions at Committee meetings at which compen- sation of his direct reports and the other Section 16 officers are discussed. The Executive Vice President, Human Resources and the Senior Director of Compensation and Benefits make the recommendation regarding the Chief Executive Officer’s compensation with the input and advice of the Committee’s advisors. Performance factors considered in developing recommendations for the Committee include Mr. Kriens’ leadership, strategic planning, delivery of financial results and succession planning. All decisions regarding Mr. Kriens compensation are made by the Committee in executive session, without Mr. Kriens present. The Committee considers, but is not in any way bound by, and frequently changes recommendations made by Company management. Similarly, the conclusions reached and recommendations made by outside advisors can also be accepted, rejected or modified by the Committee. Assessing the Competitive Market for Talent In making compensation decisions, the Committee takes into account many factors described below, including the competitive market for executive talent. The Committee uses competitive market data to establish reference points for evaluating compensation for Section 16 officers. As there is considerable variation in the compensation amounts and methodologies used among companies and because no two companies possess the exact same characteristics, size, structure, business, history and prospects, the Committee relies on a specific peer company analysis of publicly-available data on a group of publicly-traded networking equipment and other high technology companies (the “Peer Group”) and “market data” composed of a broad technology company sample. The companies included in the Peer Group are ones which the Committee believes are similar in size and business scope to Juniper Networks and companies with which Juniper Networks competes for talent. This list is periodically reviewed and updated by the Committee to take into account changes in both the Company’s business and the businesses of the peer companies. For 2007, the Peer Group consisted of the following companies: Adobe Systems, Inc.; Autodesk, Inc.; Avaya, Inc.; BEA Systems, Inc.; BMC Software, Inc.; CA, Inc.; Corning, Inc.; Earthlink, Inc.; eBay, Inc.; Intuit, Inc.; Network Appliance, Inc.; Symantec Corporation; Tellabs, Inc.; VeriSign, Inc.; and Yahoo, Inc. Because of the variations between companies as to which individuals and roles compensation is disclosed, there will not be available directly comparable information from each peer company with respect to each of our Section 16 officers or named executive officers. For the 2007 annual compensation review completed by Mercer, the broad-based technology company data was drawn from several sources, including: the Buck Executive High Technology Survey, the Radford Executive Survey, the Watson Wyatt Report on Top Executive Compensation, and the Mercer Benchmark Database. For corporate positions, data was collected for companies between $1 billion and $6 billion in sales revenue. For the general managers who are compensated in part based on the performance of their respective business unit, the Committee received survey data for Top Business Unit Executives scoped to the sales revenue size of each respective business unit at the Company. For 2008, the Peer Group was revised at the recommendation of Mercer to replace certain companies that were acquired or were deemed to engage in atypical pay practices compared to the other members of the group. The 2008 Peer Group consisted of the following companies: Adobe Systems, Inc.; Autodesk, Inc.; Avaya, Inc.; BMC Software, Inc.; CA, Inc.; Corning, Inc.; Earthlink, Inc.; eBay, Inc.; Harris Corporation; Intuit, Inc.; Network Appliance, Inc.; Symantec Corporation; Tellabs, Inc.; VeriSign, Inc.; and UTStarcom, Inc. The data on the compensation practices of the Peer Group is gathered through publicly available information. Because of the variations between companies as to which individuals and roles compensation is disclosed, there will not be available directly comparable information from each peer company with respect to each of our Section 16 officers or named executive officers. For the 2008 annual compensation review completed by Mercer, the broad-based technology company data was drawn from several sources, including: the Buck Executive High Technology Survey and the Radford Executive 26


  • Page 37

    Survey. For corporate positions, data was collected for companies between $1 billion and $6 billion in sales revenue. For the general managers who are compensated in part based on the performance of their respective business unit, the Committee received survey data for Top Business Unit Executives scoped to the sales revenue size of each respective business unit at the Company. In addition to the market data sources discussed above, the Committee also considers other information and factors in determining compensation for individual Section 16 officers including, internal consistency between Juniper Networks employees, job performance, skills, prior experience, competitive job offers made to Juniper Networks employees, recruiting offers made by Juniper Networks, and market conditions. Finally, in some cases, the compensation for newly hired Section 16 officers may be determined based on the recruitment negotiations with such individuals, and may reflect such factors as the amounts of compensation that the individual would forego by joining Juniper Networks or the costs of relocation. Elements of Executive Compensation The principal components of compensation for Section 16 officers are: • Base salary • Performance-based cash incentive compensation • Long-term equity incentive compensation, such as stock options, restricted stock units and performance shares • Employee benefits and perquisites • Severance benefits Juniper Networks has selected these elements of compensation because each is considered useful and/or necessary to meet one or more of the principal objectives of our compensation policy. Base salary and employee benefits are set with the goal of attracting employees by guaranteeing a minimum level of compensation for services performed. Performance-based cash incentives are provided to incentivize or reward achievement of short-term or annual performance goals. Long-term equity incentives are provided to align executive interests with those of our stockholders and to promote achievement of long-term business objectives and retention of key talent. The Committee reviews the compensation program on an annual basis. The Committee’s annual review is primarily focused on the structure of the performance based incentive plans overall and, with respect to individual Section 16 officers, on (i) base salary, (ii) total target cash compensation (base salary + performance based cash incentive) and (iii) long-term equity incentive compensation and total direct compensation (total target cash comp + long-term equity incentive). Except for the proposed Deferred Compensation Program and Executive Wellness Program described below, the Company does not typically offer perquisites or employee benefits to Section 16 officers that are not also made available to employees on a broad basis. Severance benefits have been approved either in connection with the negotiations to recruit individual executives or periodically as part of a program to extend such benefits to Section 16 officers as a group. Accordingly, severance benefits, employee benefits and perquisites are reviewed from time to time, but not annually, to ensure that benefit levels remain competitive and are reasonable and not excessive. Base Salary Salaries are used to provide a fixed amount of compensation for the executive’s regular work. The Company targets base salary levels for each position, on average, at the 50th percentile of similar positions based on competitive market data. Some variation above or below the competitive median occurs when, in the judgment of management and/or the Compensation Committee, as appropriate, the factors described above influence a different positioning. The salaries of the Section 16 officers are reviewed on an annual basis, as well as at the time of a promotion or other change in responsibilities. The effective date of annual increases typically is April 1st of each year. 27


  • Page 38

    Pursuant to the 2007 annual compensation review and based on the performance of the company in 2006, no changes were made to the base salaries of Mr. Edward Minshull, Mr. Robert Dykes. The Committee approved an increase in base salary for Mr. Kriens intended to make his salary more competitive with the market and to place his salary above that of our Chief Operating Officer. The Committee also approved an increase in salary and a decrease in annual target incentive for Ms. Kim Perdikou in order to rebalance her cash compensation between salary (which was below market) and annual cash incentive compensation (which was above market). In January 2007, Mr. Stephen Elop joined the Company and in August 2007, Ms. Robyn Denholm joined the Company. Their respective base salaries and other compensation were determined with reference to the competitive market data discussed above and through negotiation. Pursuant to the 2008 annual compensation review, no changes were made to the base salary of Mr. Minshull because his salary was above the median percentile of the competitive market data. The Committee noted that this was primarily due to the fact that Mr. Minshull is paid in British Pounds and exchange rates have impacted his compensation relative to the other named executive officers. The base salaries of Mr. Kriens, Ms. Denholm and Ms. Perdikou were increased by approximately 16.7%, 4.2% and 5%, respectively. The increases to the salaries of Mr. Kriens and Ms. Perdikou were intended to bring their salaries closer to the median of the Peer Group. Even after the adjustment, Mr. Kriens’ salary is substantially below the median. However, the Committee concluded that it would continue to move his salary toward the median over multiple years rather than attempt to close this gap in one large step. The increase to Ms. Denholm’s salary places her total target cash compensation slightly above the median for the Peer Group and the Committee determined this was appropriate in light of Ms. Denholm’s performance in 2007. Performance-Based Cash Incentive Compensation Target Incentives as a Percentage of Salary As discussed above, the Company’s compensation objective is to have a significant portion of each Section 16 officer’s compensation tied to performance. To this end, the Company has established a target annual performance- based cash incentive opportunity for each Section 16 officer expressed as a percent of base salary. In establishing the amount of target incentive, the Committee takes into account the competitive market data, a desired positioning at the market median, the individual’s role and contribution to performance, and internal consistency among executives at a comparable level. The actual award earned may be higher or lower than this target incentive amount based on company, business unit, and/or individual performance factors. For 2007, taking into account the changes made to base salary and other factors discussed above, the Committee determined that no changes be made to the target incentive (as a percentage of base salary) for Mr. Kriens, Mr. Minshull or Mr. Dykes and they remained at 150%, 100% and 100%, respectively. With respect to Ms. Perdikou, the Committee determined that in light of her review of total cash compensation market data, the mix of cash compensation between base salary and variable incentive should be rebalanced. As a result, the amount of target incentive was reduced from 100% to 75% of base salary for Ms. Perdikou. In connection with their joining the Company, Mr. Elop’s target incentive was established at 125% of base salary earned in 2007 and Ms. Denholm’s target incentive was established at 100% of base salary earned in 2007. The Committee determined Mr. Elop’s target based on two factors. First, the Committee concluded that it was desirable to use the 125% amount in order to weight Mr. Elop’s total cash compensation more heavily on achievement of Company performance objectives than other executive officers (other than Mr. Kriens). Second, the Committee determined that the target incentive percentage was consistent with the general compensation objective of targeting Mr. Elop’s total cash compensation at approximately the median percentile for his position based on competitive market data. The target incentive for Ms. Denholm placed her total cash compensation slightly above the median percentile for her position based on the competitive market data, but the Committee determined that this was necessary to recruit Ms. Denholm to join Juniper Networks, was consistent with the target incentive for the Company’s prior Chief Financial Officer and was consistent with the opportunities for other senior executives with comparable positions. 28


  • Page 39

    In 2008, the Company’s objective was to target total cash compensation at approximately the market median of the Peer Group. Taking into account the changes made to base salary discussed above and the Peer Group data for total cash compensation, the Committee determined that no changes be made to the target incentive percentages for the Company’s named executive officers. Annual Incentive Plans Each year an annual incentive plan is established for Section 16 officers in order to reward those individuals based on performance against various business objectives for that year or for a portion of that year, as described below. For 2007, the Company altered its executive short-term incentive plan from a six month plan to an annual plan. The Company took this action to align its short-term incentive plan with market practice. In addition, the Company believes that achievement of the Company’s business plan and near term business objectives are best effectuated through a cash incentive plan tied to performance goals established for a period of one year. Because of the rapidly changing industry in which the Company competes, the Company believes that by establishing goals that are measured over an annual basis, the goals can be established with greater specificity and linkage to the operating plan objectives and with less risk of subsequent revision than if objectives were based on longer measurement periods. The Committee also believes that goals that can be achieved over an annual period are more effective at motivating performance and promoting retention than goals which take a longer time to achieve and are therefore inherently less under the control of the individual to accomplish. Moreover, the Company also believes that establishing an annual plan provides the Company with the flexibility to adjust the structure and objectives of its plan to meet changes in the Company’s business and competitive environment. To promote achievement of longer term objectives, the Company relies on equity incentives discussed in more detail below. 2007 Annual Incentive Plan. For the 2007 fiscal year, the Committee approved the 2007 Annual Incentive Plan (the “2007 AIP”) for Section 16 officers. Under the 2007 AIP, each participant is eligible to receive an annual incentive bonus once per year following the end of the year based on achievement of specified objectives established at the beginning of the year. The Company believes that the primary performance measurements should be based on achieving key financial targets tied to the Company’s annual operating plan. The incentive is based 50% on the Company’s revenue results, 30% on the Company’s non-GAAP operating income results and 20% on achieving other specified strategic goals, such as employee engagement and leadership development. However, in the case of a general manager of a business group, such as Ms. Kim Perdikou, Executive Vice President and General Manager Infrastructure Products Group, the revenue and operating income factors are based half on achieving the Company’s revenue and non-GAAP operating income targets and half on achieving the applicable business group’s revenue and non-GAAP contribution margin targets. The incentive amounts are calculated and paid after the end of the year. The amounts paid depend on the level of achievement against the objectives and, with respect to the revenue and operating income objectives, range between zero and 200% of the target incentive. With respect to the specified strategic goals, payments range between zero and 100% of the target incentive. However, no payment is earned for any component if less than 80% of the operating income objective is achieved. At 80% of the objective, 30% of the applicable component is earned; achievement of 100% of the objective results in 100% of the component earned; and if 120% of the revenue or operating income objective is achieved, 200% of that component is earned. At the time the Committee set the performance goals for the participants under the 2007 AIP, it believed that they were achievable but only with significant effort. Upon completion of the measurement period for 2007, the Committee reviewed the performance of the Company, each applicable business group and each Section 16 officer to verify and approve the calculations of the amounts to be paid under the 2007 AIP. 29


  • Page 40

    Payments to Section named executive officers under the 2007 Bonus Plan ranged between 109% and 117% of the individual’s target bonus for year. The following table summarizes the payments for the Company’s named executive officers: 2007 Annual Incentive Plan Payments Percentage of Fiscal 2007 Performance 2007 AIP Name Target Achieved Payment Scott Kriens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 109% $981,000 Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Robyn Denholm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 109% $218,000(1) Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer Robert Dykes(2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... N/A N/A Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer Stephen Elop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 109% $735,750 Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer Edward Minshull(3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 109% $506,414 Executive Vice President, Worldwide Field Operations Kim Perdikou. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 117% $302,738 Executive Vice President and General Manager, Infrastructure Products Group (1) Ms. Denholm’s payment is based on her annual base salary, prorated from the commencement of her employment in August 2007. (2) Mr. Dykes resigned from his position at the Company in 2007 and was not eligible for payment under the 2007 AIP. (3) Mr. Minshull is paid in British Pounds (£). The 2007 compensation amounts for Mr. Minshull in this proxy statement are presented on an as-converted to U.S. Dollars ($) basis at a rate of $2.02 for each £1. This represents the exchange rate in effect for conversion of British Pounds to U.S. Dollars as of December 31, 2007. 2008 Annual Incentive Plan. For the 2008 fiscal year, the Committee approved the 2008 Annual Incentive Plan (the “2008 AIP”) for Section 16 officers. Under the 2008 AIP, each participant is eligible to receive an annual incentive bonus once per year following the end of the year based on achievement of specified objectives established at the beginning of the year. The Company believes that the primary performance measurements should be based on achieving key financial targets tied to the Company’s annual operating plan. The incentive is based 50% on the Company’s revenue results, 30% on the Company’s non-GAAP operating income results and 20% on achieving other specified strategic goals, such as employee engagement and leadership development. However, in the case of a general manager of a business group, the revenue and operating income factors are based half on achieving the Company’s revenue and non-GAAP operating income targets and half on achieving the applicable business group’s revenue and non-GAAP operating income targets. The incentive amounts are calculated and paid after the end of 2008. The amounts paid depend on the level of achievement against the objectives and, with respect to the revenue and operating income objectives, range between zero and 200% of the target incentive. With respect to the specified strategic goals, payments range between zero and 100% of the target incentive. However, no payment is earned for any component if less than 80% of the operating income objective is achieved. At 80% of the objective, 30% of the applicable component is earned; achievement of 100% of the objective results in 100% of the component earned; and if 120% of the revenue or operating income objective is achieved, 200% of that component 30


  • Page 41

    is earned. At the time the Committee set the performance goals for the participants under the 2007 AIP, it believed that they were achievable but only with significant effort. Sign-on Incentive for Ms. Denholm In connection with the hiring of Ms. Denholm in August 2007, the Committee approved the payment of a sign- on incentive to Ms. Denholm of $250,000, which is subject to repayment on a prorated basis if she is terminated with cause or voluntarily terminates her employment without good reason, each as defined in her offer letter, in the first year of her employment. The Committee determined that such bonus was reasonable and necessary to secure the services of Ms. Denholm in light of the expected incentive compensation from her prior employer that Ms. Denholm had forgone in connection with joining Juniper Networks. Long-Term Equity Incentive Compensation Juniper Networks provides long-term equity incentive compensation through awards of stock options, performance shares and restricted stock units. The Company’s equity compensation programs are intended to align the interests of its employees with those of its stockholders by creating an incentive for our Section 16 officers to drive financial performance over time and maximize stockholder value. The equity compensation program also is designed to encourage our Section 16 officers to remain employed with the Company. 2007 Long-Term Incentive Program. For 2007, the Company reviewed its approach to equity awards and decided to increase the focus on pay-for-performance by introducing performance shares into the mix of equity awards, replacing the performance-awarded restricted stock unit grant opportunity provided to Section 16 officers in 2006. The Company retained stock options as a key element of its equity compensation program. The performance shares are earned based on performance against specific financial goals and then vest over time. To the extent that specified performance goals are not met, shares are not earned. If an executive fails to satisfy the service requirement, any earned shares are forfeited. The Committee believes that this combination of performance and service requirements provides incentives to achieve both specified performance objectives and increases in the Company’s stock price and also promotes retention. For 2007, in determining the amount of long-term equity incentives to award each individual, the Committee evaluated the value of the proposed long-term equity awards and total direct compensation and compared those values to the market data discussed above. For 2007, to reflect the change in the Company’s size and maturity, the Company’s objective was to move total direct compensation towards the 50th percentile of the market. However, in making individual awards, the Committee took into account the individual executive’s performance, previously granted awards, and in the case of executives other than the CEO, the CEO’s recommendations for award levels. In structuring the 2007 awards, the Committee sought to allocate approximately 50% of the value to stock options and 50% to performance shares. The Committee believed that the 50/50 split fairly balanced the need for focus on long-term stockholder value creation and on intermediate financial performance objectives. Stock option grants were valued using a risk-adjusted present value methodology, assuming an exercise price of $20.00 and resulting in an estimated option value of $9.52 per share. Performance shares were valued assuming target performance and at an assumed grant price of $20.00 per share. The stock options were granted by the Company on March 9, 2007 and have an exercise price equal to the closing market price on the date of grant of $18.31 per share. The options have a seven year term and vest with respect to 25% of the shares on the first anniversary of grant and with respect to 1/48th of the shares each month thereafter, assuming continued service to the Company. The performance shares were granted on March 9, 2007 and vest based on achievement of specific performance objectives established for each year of a three-year period. The amount of performance shares earned for a particular year is based on the achievement of annual performance targets established for that year. For 2007 and 2008, the performance goals are based on revenue and non-GAAP operating margin. At the time the Committee set the target performance goals, it believed that they were achievable but only with significant effort. With respect to each year’s performance, the individual can earn between 0% and 200% of the target number of shares for that year depending on the level of achievement against the goals established for that year. (The target 31


  • Page 42

    number of shares for each year is one third of the target number of shares for the entire three year period). Provided the employee is still employed on the date that the Committee approves the performance calculation for the third year, the employee is issued a number of fully paid and fully vested shares of common stock equal to the number “earned” over the three year period. For example: an employee is granted performance shares for a maximum of 60,000 shares with a target number of 30,000 shares over a three year period. During the first year the Company achieves the target revenues and target operating margin, and the employee earns the target number of 10,000 shares for that year, or 1/3 of the total target number of shares for the full three year period. During the second year, the Company achieves target revenue but is below target operating margin and the employee earns 5,000 shares. During the third year, the Company exceeds its performance targets and the employee earns 20,000 shares. Accordingly, the employee is issued at the completion of the three year cycle a total of 35,000 fully vested shares. No shares are vested or issued prior to the completion of the third year, and any earned but unvested shares are forfeited if the employee leaves the Company before they are vested and paid. The following table reflects the performance shares earned by our named executive officers under the 2007 performance share award program for the awards granted on March 9, 2007: 2007 Performance Share Awards Number of Original Total Percentage of Performance Shares Remaining Target Performance Fiscal 2007 Targets Earned for Fiscal Performance Share Name Share Amount Achieved 2007 Performance Target Amount Scott Kriens . . . . . . . . . . . 100,000 112% 37,334 66,666 Robyn Denholm . . . . . . . . N/A N/A N/A N/A(1) Robert Dykes . . . . . . . . . . N/A N/A N/A N/A(2) Stephen Elop . . . . . . . . . . 100,000 N/A N/A N/A(3) Edward Minshull . . . . . . . 33,000 112% 12,320 22,000 Kim Perdikou . . . . . . . . . . 33,000 112% 12,320 22,000 (1) Ms. Denholm was not employed by the Company at the time these awards were granted. (2) Not applicable due to resignation of individual in 2007. (3) Not applicable due to resignation of individual in 2008. 2007 Restricted Stock Unit Awards (Based on 2006 Results). Prior to 2006, the Company relied primarily on stock options to provide equity incentives to its Section 16 officers. In 2006, the Committee concluded that a combination of both stock options and performance-awarded restricted stock units would better address the Company’s compensation strategy, especially the need to balance incentives to drive performance with the need to attract and retain executive talent. In establishing the amount of long-term equity incentives to award each individual, the Committee evaluated the total value of the proposed long-term equity awards and compared it to the competitive market data discussed above. In 2006, the Company’s objective was to target long term equity incentive compensation at approximately the 75th percentile of market data. In addition, the Committee also evaluated the retention value of prior equity awards granted to an individual based on the potential value of the unvested portion of those awards under various scenarios. In structuring the 2006 awards, the Committee sought to allocate 50% of the value to stock options and 50% to performance awarded restricted stock units. Performance awarded restricted stock grant guidelines were created by applying a ratio of one share subject to a restricted stock unit being equivalent to 2.5 shares subject to a stock option. This number was then increased by 20% to reflect the additional risk associated with the performance feature discussed below. The restricted stock units were awarded under a program pursuant to which the number of restricted stock units issued to each officer was dependent on the achievement of earnings per share objectives for 2006. At the time the Committee set the target performance goals for the participants under the 2006 restricted stock unit program, it believed that they were achievable but only with significant effort. Depending on the level of performance against the objectives, participants could receive restricted stock units for as much as 150% of the target number of 32


  • Page 43

    restricted stock units or as few as 25% of the target number of restricted stock units. The restricted stock units were issued after the 2006 performance period vest as to 75% of the shares on February 27, 2008, 15% on February 27, 2009 and 10% on February 27, 2010. The following table reflects the restricted stock units earned by our named executive officers under the 2006 restricted stock unit program and issued on February 27, 2007: 2007 Restricted Stock Unit Awards (Based on 2006 Results) Target Number of Number Number Number Restricted Percentage Restricted Vesting Vesting Vesting Stock Unit of Targets Stock Units February 27, February 27, February 27, Name Amount Achieved Issued 2008 2009 2010 Scott Kriens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100,000 56% 56,000 42,000 8,400 5,600 Robyn Denholm . . . . . . . . . . . . . N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Robert Dykes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,000 56% 18,480 0(1) 0(1) 0(1) Stephen Elop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Edward Minshull . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 56% 28,000 21,000 4,200 2,800 Kim Perdikou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,000 56% 14,000 10,500 2,100 1,400 (1) Due to resignation of individual, none of the amounts vested. 2007 Retention Equity Awards. On January 4, 2007, the Compensation Committee awarded restricted stock units to Mr. Minshull and Ms. Perdikou in the amount of 120,000 and 80,000 shares respectively. Such restricted stock units vest as to 25% of the shares on February 1, 2008, 25% on February 1, 2009 and 50% on February 1, 2010. The recommendation for these awards was made by the Chief Executive Officer. In determining whether to provide these awards and how many restricted stock units to award, the Compensation Committee considered several factors including the expected value of the awards currently and under various stock price scenarios, whether existing options were underwater, how critical are the contributions made by the individual, an assessment of retention risk and the employee’s current target compensation before and after the award relative to market data and other executive officers in the Company. These equity awards were intended to promote the retention of the individuals by providing additional time-based equity awards. 2006 Promotion Equity Award Granted in 2007. In May 2006, Ms. Perdikou was promoted from acting General Manager to Executive Vice President Infrastructure Products Group and General Manager, Service Provider Business Team. However, due to the stock option pricing investigation being conducted by the Company, the Company did not grant her any stock options associated with that promotion until some time after the completion of the investigation. Accordingly, Ms. Perdikou was granted an option to purchase 300,000 shares of our common stock on February 27, 2007. The stock option award has an exercise price equal to the closing market price on the date of grant of $18.53 per share. The option has a seven year term and vests with respect to 25% of the shares on the first anniversary of grant and with respect to 1/48th of the shares each month thereafter, assuming continued service to the Company. 2008 Long-Term Incentive Program. For 2008, the Company reviewed its approach to equity awards, and the Committee decided to maintain the structure of long-term incentives similar to 2007 by providing a mix of stock option and performance shares to Section 16 officers. Like the 2007 awards, the performance shares approved by the Committee vest based on a combination of time and performance against specific objectives. In determining the amount of long-term equity incentives to award each individual, the Committee evaluated the value of the proposed long-term equity awards and total direct compensation and compared those values to the competitive market data discussed above. For 2008, to reflect the growth in the Company’s size and maturity, and based on the evaluation of its compensation practices relative to the Peer Group, the Company’s objective was to continue to target total direct compensation near the 50th percentile of the Peer Group market data discussed above. However, within this general objective, the specific number of equity awards for each of the Section 16 officers was based on their respective roles and grade level. In structuring the 2008 awards, the Committee sought to allocate 50% of the value to stock options and 50% to the performance shares. Stock option grants were valued using a 33


  • Page 44

    Black-Scholes methodology, assuming an exercise price of $29.57 and resulting in an estimated option value of $11.03 per share. Performance shares were valued assuming target performance and at an assumed grant price of $29.57 per share for the purpose of establishing grant guidelines. The stock options were granted by the Company on March 21, 2008 and have an exercise price equal to the closing market price in effect on the date of grant of $25.16 per share. The options have a seven year term and vest with respect to 25% of the shares on the first anniversary of grant and with respect to 1/48th of the shares each month thereafter, assuming continued service to the Company. The performance shares were granted on March 21, 2008 and vest at the end of three years based on achievement of specific performance objectives established for each year of a three-year period. The amount of performance shares earned for a particular year is based on the achievement of annual performance targets established for that year. For 2008, the performance targets are based on revenue and non-GAAP operating margin. At the time the Committee set the target performance goals, it believed that they were achievable but only with significant effort. With respect to each year’s performance, the individual can earn between 0% and 200% of the target amount for that year depending on the level of achievement against the targets established for that year (the target amount for each year is one third of the target amount for the entire three year period). The terms of the 2008 performance shares are otherwise substantially identical to the 2007 performance shares discussed above. Equity Ownership Guidelines. The Company believes that the significant component of each Section 16 officer’s overall compensation based on equity awards is sufficient to align the officer’s interests with those of the stockholders. Moreover, the Company has also established limitations on the maximum amount of an officer’s stock and option holdings that the officer can sell within any quarter or year without first obtaining the approval of the Board of Directors. Accordingly, the Company has not adopted any specific requirements as to a minimum number of shares that must be owned by an officer. Stock Option Granting Policy. In 2007, the Board of Directors approved a policy for granting stock options and equity awards. New hire and ad hoc promotional and adjustment grants to non-executive employees are to be granted monthly on the third Friday of the month, except as discussed below. If a quorum of the Stock Committee (currently composed of the Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and one outside director) is not available for a meeting on or prior to the third Friday of the month or in the four days preceding it, grants are to be approved by means of an action by written consent. Such consent shall by its terms provide that the options will be granted upon the later of (i) the third Friday of the month or (ii) the date of the last signature of the Stock Committee members. Annual performance grants to non-Section 16 officers will also be scheduled to occur on the same date as a monthly grant and shall be approved by the Stock Committee in the manner described above. Grants in connection with acquisitions shall, unless a date is specified in the acquisition agreement, occur to the extent practical on a date on which equity awards to Company employees are made by the Stock Committee. Annual equity awards to Section 16 officers will be generally scheduled to be approved at a meeting of the Compensation Committee in the first quarter after the Q4 earnings announcement and prior to March 1. The annual grants to Section 16 persons are also generally scheduled to be effective on the third Friday of the month if the meeting approving such grants occurs on or before such date. Notwithstanding the foregoing, if the Company is advised by outside counsel that the granting of equity awards on a particular date or to particular recipients, or prior to the disclosure of certain non- public information, could reasonably be deemed to be a violation of applicable laws or regulations, such grants may be delayed until such time as the granting of those awards would be not reasonably expected to constitute a violation. If doing a particular monthly grant would cause the Company to exceed any granting limitation imposed by the Board or Compensation Committee (such as an annual limit), the monthly grant shall be delayed until the first subsequent month in which the limitation would not be exceeded. If the making of a grant would cause the Company to violate the terms of any agreement approved by the Board or a Committee of the Board, such grant shall be delayed until it would not be in violation of such agreement. The exercise price of options granted will be the closing market price on the effective date of grant. The Company intends to grant options in accordance with the foregoing policy without regard to the timing of the release of material non-public information, such as a positive or negative earnings announcement. Deferred Compensation Program. In addition to the long term incentive programs described above, the Company plans to adopt and implement a deferred compensation program for certain grade levels of Company 34


  • Page 45

    management, including Section 16 officers, beginning in June 2008. The Company plans to implement this program in order to offer benefits that are competitive with companies with which it competes for talent. This program, once implemented, would allow participants to elect to defer a certain amount of compensation earned into one or more investment choices. The participants would not be taxed on the compensation deferred into these investments until distribution of invested funds to the participant at a future date, which may be upon termination of employment with the Company or a designated “in-service” date elected by the participant. Employee Benefits and Perquisites Historically, the Company has made available to Section 16 officers the same employee benefits and perquisites that are available to employees broadly. The Company provides employee benefit programs and perquisites to employees, including Section 16 officers, that the Company and the Committee believe are reasonable and consistent with its overall compensation program to better enable the Company to attract and retain employees. Except for the Deferred Compensation Program described above and the Executive Wellness Program described below, there are no other special benefit plans or programs applicable to Section 16 officers. Accordingly, employee benefits and perquisites are reviewed from time to time generally to ensure that benefit levels remain competitive but are generally not included in the Committee’s annual determination of a Section 16 officer’s compensation package. Section 16 officers are entitled to participate on the same basis and in the same medical, dental, vision, disability, life insurance and other plans and programs made available to other full time employees in the applicable country of residence. In addition, the Committee approved the adoption of an Executive Wellness Program (the “Wellness Program”) beginning in June 2008. Under the Wellness Program, eligible executives, including Section 16 officers, will receive additional benefits focused on health care screening and wellness. The total value this benefit is limited to $10,000 per year for each eligible executive. The Committee believes that by promoting the health and wellness of its executives can result in a number of benefits to the Company, including increased productivity, better presenteeism and increased organizational stability, among others. The Company has a 401(k) tax-qualified retirement savings plan pursuant to which all U.S. based employees are entitled to participate. Employees can make contributions to the plan on a before-tax basis to the maximum amount prescribed by the Internal Revenue Service. The Company will match 25% of the amount contributed by the employee. The Company matching contributions are fully-vested upon contribution. Mr. Minshull participates in the Group Personal Pension Plan which is a tax-qualified defined contribution retirement plan available to all full time employees in the United Kingdom. The Company contributes 7% of an employee’s base salary to the plan following an initial period of service, which Mr. Minshull has satisfied. As such, Company contributions for Mr. Minshull are fully-vested upon contribution. The Company does not match employee contributions to this plan. Other than these generally available plans, there are no other deferred savings plans in which the Section 16 officers currently participate. The Company does not maintain or provide any defined benefit plans for its employees. As is typical for the Company’s managers in Europe, Mr. Minshull is given a car allowance. Mr. Minshull receives a car allowance of $2,424 per month in arrears, less deductions for tax and U.K. National Insurance taxes contributions. He is also entitled to reimbursement of fuel costs through the standard expense reimbursement process. From time to time, the Company may agree to reimburse employees for relocation costs if the employee’s job responsibilities require him or her to move a significant distance. In connection with Mr. Elop’s joining the Company in January 2007, the Company agreed to reimburse Mr. Elop for relocation expenses to facilitate his move to a location near the Company’s corporate headquarters. Mr. Elop was reimbursed $19,843 in connection with such expenses. Attributed costs of the personal benefits described above for the named executive officers for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2007, are included in the column entitled “All Other Compensation” in the Summary Compensation Table on page 40. 35


  • Page 46

    Severance Benefits In addition to compensation designed to reward employees for service and performance, the Company has approved certain severance and change of control provisions for certain employees, including named executive officers. Basic Severance. In order to recruit executives to the Company and encourage retention of employees, the Company believes it is appropriate and necessary to provide assurance of certain severance payments if the Company terminates the individual’s employment without cause, as described below. On January 4, 2007, the Committee approved severance benefits for several members of senior management, including Mr. Kriens, Mr. Elop, Mr. Minshull and Ms. Perdikou. In the event the employee is terminated involuntarily by Juniper Networks without cause, as defined in the agreement, and provided the employee executes a full release of claims, in a form satisfactory to Juniper Networks, promptly following termination, the employee will be entitled to receive the following severance benefits: (i) an amount equal to six months of base salary and (ii) an amount equal to half of the individual’s annual target bonus for the fiscal year in which the termination occurs. Upon the commencement of her employment in August 2007, Ms. Denholm entered into a severance agreement with the Company that provided the aforementioned benefits upon substantially similar terms as the other named executive officers plus six months of Company-paid health, dental and vision insurance coverage. In addition, Ms. Denholm’s severance agreement provides that in the event Ms. Denholm voluntarily terminates her employment with the Company within the first two (2) years of employment for good reason, as defined in the agreement, and provided she executes a full release of claims, promptly following termination Ms. Denholm shall receive the following severance benefits: (i) an amount equal to six months of base salary, (ii) an amount equal to half of her annual target bonus for the fiscal year in which the termination occurs, (iii) six months of Company-paid health, dental and vision insurance coverage, (iv) provided no shares have otherwise vested under the restricted stock unit award granted to Ms. Denholm in August 2007, acceleration of vesting of such restricted stock units equal to the total number of shares covered by such award, multiplied by the number of full months of service to the Company completed through the date of termination divided by 48, and (v) provided no shares have otherwise vested under the above stock option award granted to Ms. Denholm in August 2007, acceleration of vesting of such options equal to the total number of shares covered by such award, multiplied by the number of full months of service to the Company completed through the date of termination divided by 48. The Company believes that the size of the severance packages described is consistent with severance offered by other companies of the Company’s size or in the Company’s industry. The Company had also entered into an agreement with Mr. Dykes on December 13, 2004, which provides that if Mr. Dykes is terminated involuntarily by the Company without cause, as defined in the agreement, promptly following termination Mr. Dykes will be entitled to receive the following severance benefits: (i) an amount equal to six months of his base salary, (ii) an amount equal to half of his annual at target bonus for the fiscal year in which termination occurs and (iii) and acceleration of six months of vesting of his initial grant of options to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock. Mr. Dykes was provided the benefits described above after his employment terminated. 36


  • Page 47

    The following table describes the potential payments upon termination of employment without cause (assuming the change in control benefits discussed below do not apply) for each of the named executive officers as described above. Amounts payable is cash assume relevant salary, bonus and benefit values in effect as of December 31, 2007. The amounts in the following table for equity awards for Ms. Denholm represent the additional value of the awards that vest as a result of the resignation for good reason (as defined in the applicable agreement). For purposes of valuing the equity awards, the amounts below are based on a per share price of $33.20, which was the closing price as reported on the Nasdaq Global Select Market on December 31, 2007. The amounts in the following table related to benefits represent the amounts payable by the Company to maintain Ms. Denholm’s benefits for the period following termination of employment as described above. Potential Severance Payments for Termination Without Cause Value of Cash Accelerated Equity Name Severance Bonus Awards Benefits Scott Kriens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $300,000 $450,000 N/A N/A Robyn Denholm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $240,000 $240,000 $157,625(1) $7,262 Robert Dykes(2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N/A N/A N/A N/A Stephen Elop(3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $270,000 $337,500 N/A N/A Edward Minshull . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $232,300 $232,300 N/A N/A Kim Perdikou. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $172,500 $129,375 N/A N/A (1) Vesting acceleration applicable only in connection with resignation for good reason as described above. (2) Not applicable due to resignation of Mr. Dykes in 2007. (3) Mr. Elop resigned from the Company in January 2008. Change in Control Severance. The Committee considers maintaining a stable and effective management team to be essential to protecting and enhancing the best interests of Juniper Networks and its stockholders. To that end, Juniper Networks recognizes that the possibility of a change in control may exist from time to time, and that this possibility, and the uncertainty and questions it may raise among management, may result in the departure or distraction of management to the detriment of the Company and its stockholders. Accordingly, the Committee decided to take appropriate steps to encourage the continued attention, dedication and continuity of members of the Company’s management to their assigned duties without the distraction that may arise from the possibility of a change in control. As a result, the Committee approved certain severance benefits for Mr. Kriens, Ms. Denholm, Mr. Dykes, Mr. Elop, Mr. Minshull and Ms. Perdikou, as well as for several members of senior management, in the event of a change in control. In approving these benefits the committee considered a number of factors, including the prevalence of similar benefits adopted by other publicly traded companies. Under the benefits approved by the Committee, provided the employee signs a release of claims and complies with certain post termination non-solicitation and non-competition obligations, the employee will receive change in control severance benefits if either (i) the employee is terminated without cause within 12 months following the change in control or (ii) between 4 and 12 months following a change in control the employee terminates his or her employment with the Company (or any parent or subsidiary of the Company) for good reason” (both “cause” and “good reason” are defined in the agreement). For the purposes of this agreement, a reduction in duties, title, authority or responsibilities solely by virtue of the Company being acquired and made part of a larger entity (as, for example, when the Chief Financial Officer of the Company remains the Chief Financial Officer of the subsidiary or business unit substantially containing the Company’s business following a change of control) does not by itself constitute grounds for “good reason”. The change in control severance benefits consist of: (i) a cash payment equal to the employee’s annual base salary plus the employee’s target bonus for the fiscal year in which the change of control or the employee’s termination occurs, whichever is greater, (ii) acceleration of vesting of all of the employee’s then unvested outstanding stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock units and other Company equity compensation awards, and (iii) one year of Company-paid health, dental and vision insurance coverage. 37


  • Page 48

    The following table describes the potential payments upon termination of employment in connection with a change in control of Juniper Networks for each of the named executive officers. The amounts in the following table for equity awards represent the value of the awards that vest as a result of the termination without cause or a resignation for “good reason” (as defined in the applicable agreement) of the named executive officer’s employment in connection with a change in control. For purposes of valuing the stock options, the amounts below are based on a per share price of $33.20, which was the closing price as reported on the Nasdaq Global Select Market on December 31, 2007. Other amounts payable assume relevant salary, bonus and benefit values in effect as of December 31, 2007. The amounts in the following table related to benefits represent the amounts payable by the Company to maintain the officer’s benefits for the period following the termination of the named executive officer’s employment in connection with a change in control as described above. Potential Payments Upon Termination in Connection with a Change in Control Value of Cash Accelerated Equity Name Severance Bonus Benefits Awards Scott Kriens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $600,000 $900,000 $14,523 $11,546,608 Robyn Denholm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $480,000 $480,000 $14,523 $ 1,891,500 Robert Dykes(1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N/A N/A N/A N/A Stephen Elop(2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $540,000 $675,000 $14,523 $ 7,211,000 Edward Minshull . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $464,600 $464,600 $14,523 $ 9,535,375 Kim Perdikou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $345,000 $258,750 $14,523 $10,828,576 (1) Not applicable due to resignation of Mr. Dykes in 2007. (2) Mr. Elop resigned from the Company in January 2008. Amendment of Certain Stock Options On May 1, 2007, the Company increased the exercise price of certain unexercised stock options held by Ms. Perdikou that had original exercise prices per share that were less than the fair market value per share of the Company’s common stock on the option’s date of grant, as determined by the Company for financial accounting purposes in connection with its investigation into historical stock option practices. The options were amended to increase the exercise price for the unexercised portion of these affected options to the appropriate fair market value per share on the date of grant. The purpose of these amendments was to avoid unfavorable tax consequences for Ms. Perdikou under United States Internal Revenue Code Section 409A (“Section 409A”) which would result upon the vesting of options that have an exercise price that is less than fair market value of the underlying common stock on the option’s date of grant. All options covered by these amendments were granted to Ms. Perdikou prior to the dates upon which she was promoted to her role as a Section 16 officer. In exchange for Ms. Perdikou agreeing to increase the exercise price of these options, the Company agreed make a cash payment to Ms. Perdikou of $61,391.63 (less any applicable tax withholdings), an amount equal to the to the incremental per share exercise price increase multiplied by the corresponding number of shares subject to the affected options. In order to satisfy the provisions of Section 409A, this payment was made in January 2008. The Impact of Favorable Accounting and Tax Treatment on Compensation Program Design Favorable accounting and tax treatment of the various elements of our compensation program is a relevant consideration in their design. However, the Company and Committee have placed a higher priority on structuring flexible compensation programs to promote the recruitment, retention and performance of Section 16 officers than on maximizing tax deducibility. Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Tax Code”), places a limit of $1,000,000 on the amount of compensation that Juniper Networks may deduct in any one year with respect to each of its five most highly paid executive officers. To maintain flexibility in compensating executive officers in a manner designed to promote varying corporate goals, the Committee has not adopted a policy requiring all compensation to be deductible. 38


  • Page 49

    There is an exception to the $1,000,000 limitation for certain performance-based compensation meeting certain requirements. The Company believes that the stock options and performance shares awarded under the Company’s 2006 Equity Incentive Plan will meet the terms of the exception. Restricted stock units are not considered performance-based under Section 162(m) of the Tax Code and, as such, are generally not deductible by the Company. The Company has not sought stockholder approval of its annual cash incentive plans, and therefore, payments under those plans may not be fully deductible. Beginning on January 1, 2006, the Company began accounting for stock-based payments including its Stock Option Program, Long-Term Stock Grant Program, Restricted Stock Program and Stock Award Program in accordance with the requirements of FASB Statement 123(R). Like many of the companies within our Peer Group, Juniper Networks has lowered both grant guidelines and option participation rates to ensure that the Company’s equity granting practice remains competitive but also within acceptable cost limitations. Compensation Committee Report The Compensation Committee of the Company has reviewed and discussed the Compensation Discussion and Analysis required by Item 402(b) of Regulation S-K with management and, based on such review and discussions, the Compensation Committee recommended to the Board that the Compensation Discussion and Analysis be included in this Proxy Statement. THE COMPENSATION COMMITTEE William R. Stensrud (Chairman) J. Michael Lawrie Compensation Committee Interlocks And Insider Participation No member of the Compensation Committee serves as a member of the board of directors or compensation committee of any entity that has one or more executive officers serving as a member of the Company’s Board of Directors or Compensation Committee. 39


  • Page 50

    Summary Compensation Table The following table discloses compensation received by Juniper Networks’ Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer during Fiscal 2006 and 2007 and Juniper Networks’ three other most highly paid executive officers (together with those persons serving as CEO and CFO during 2007, the “named executive officers”) as of December 31, 2007. Summary Compensation Table Change in Pension Value Non Nonqualified Equity Deferred Incentive Compensation All Stock Option Plan on Other Name and Principal Position Year Salary Bonus Awards(1) Awards(1) Compensation Earnings Compensation Total Scott Kriens . . . . . . . . . . 2007 $568,750 $ — $ 767,768 $2,945,118 $981,000(2) $— $ 6,367(4) $5,269,003 Chairman and 2006 $475,000 $ — $ 182,482 $5,270,777 $591,376(3) $— $ 2,540(5) $6,522,175 Chief Executive Officer Robyn Denholm. . . . . . . . 2007 $183,637 $250,000(6) $ 135,240 $ 264,207 $218,000(2) $— $ 2,954(7) $1,054,038 Executive Vice 2006 $ — $ — $ — $ — $ — $— $ — $ — President, Chief Financial Officer Robert Dykes . . . . . . . . . 2007 $143,939 $ — $ 216,015 $1,303,805 $ — $— $ 441,275(9) $2,105,034 Executive Vice 2006 $400,000 $125,000(8) $ 60,219 $1,933,599 $338,000(3) $— $ 4,257(5) $2,861,075 President, Chief Financial Officer Stephen Elop . . . . . . . . . . 2007 $529,772 $ — $ 113,177 $ 530,369 $735,750(2) $— $ 24,609(10) $1,933,677 Executive Vice 2006 $ — $ — $ — $ — $ — $— $ — $ — President, Chief Operating Officer Edward Minshull(11) . . . . 2007 $464,600 $ — $ 943,233 $ 749,109 $506,414(2) $— $ 61,610(12) $2,724,966 Executive Vice 2006 $440,789 $250,000(8) $ 91,241 $ 792,476 $381,519(3) $— $174,262(13) $2,130,287 President, Worldwide Field Operations Kim Perdikou . . . . . . . . . 2007 $333,750 $ — $586,722(14) $ 824,833 $302,738(2) $— $ 64,562(15) $2,112,605 Executive Vice 2006 $290,861 $300,000(8) $ 45,620 $ 394,553 $284,833(3) $— $ 3,250(5) $1,319,118 President and General Manager, Infrastructure Products Group (1) Amounts shown do not reflect compensation actually received by the named executive officer. Instead, the amounts shown are the compensation costs recognized by Juniper Networks in fiscal 2007 or fiscal 2006, as applicable for equity awards as determined pursuant to FAS 123R disregarding forfeiture assumptions. These compensation costs reflect option awards granted in and prior to fiscal 2007 or fiscal 2006, as applicable, as well as restricted stock unit awards earned in 2006 but issued in 2007 as described in “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” above. The assumptions used to calculate the value of option awards are set forth under Note 1 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Juniper Networks Annual Report on Form 10-K for 2007 filed with the SEC on February 29, 2008. (2) Amounts reflect bonuses earned in 2007 but paid in 2008 under the 2007 Juniper Networks Annual Incentive Plan. (3) Amounts reflect bonuses earned in 2006 but paid in 2007 under the 2006 Juniper Networks Executive Officer Bonus Plan. (4) Consists of costs related to the standard employee benefit portion paid by the Company for life and disability insurance premiums and $5,125 in matching contributions paid under the Company’s 401(k) plan. (5) Consists of costs related to the standard employee benefit portion paid by the Company for life and disability insurance premiums and $2,000 in matching contributions paid under the Company’s 401(k) plan. (6) Amount paid reflects a $250,000 sign on bonus paid to Ms. Denholm upon commencement of employment with the Company. 40

  • View More

Get the full picture and Receive alerts on lawsuits, news articles, publications and more!